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Your linux distro is assuming your BIOS clock is using UTC, and your windows install is assuming that your BIOS time is in local time. Here's how I have it set up on my laptop with a dual-boot: I make the changes linux-side to use localtime instead of UTC for the system clock. first, run a command so that the time is set properly linux-side, as root: date ...


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I can think of a couple issues that may be at play here. First, you may have daylight savings time enabled in one and not the other, or one of your OSes is configured for the wrong time zone. Linux may be assuming your computer's hardware clock is set to UTC instead of local, and Windows may think it's set to local. If you're at UTC+1 or UTC-1, you may see ...


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My understanding of the problem is: There is a set production schedule that only occurs during certain time periods on certain days We will ignore down time, lunch, breaks, etc. and assume the production line is running the entire time during that work period We have a given start time, number of units to produce, and time to produce each unit We need to ...


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I like the method of using the standard windows task scheduler to set up a job that syncs more frequently. What I like about this is that it works well and I don't have to mess with the registry. See http://www.pretentiousname.com/timesync/ for a great write up on this. The gist is: Setup a task (run taskschd.msc from cmd line) to run at the frequency ...



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