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4

Your use of DHCP is already the best way to assign address. It's not possible to use Active Directory in an of itself to assign IP addresses because a computer must have an IP address before it can communicate directly with AD. There's no way around the involvement of MAC addresses in dynamic IP address assignment. Until a computer has an IP address, it is ...


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The DHCP protocol specification allows for multiple DHCP servers, even serving different DHCP address pools (ranges), on the same LAN. However, the spec leaves it up to the client implementation to decide which lease offer to accept if it has received multiple offers because of the presence of multiple servers. It's likely that some DHCP client ...


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The first DHCP reply to arrive usually wins, there's not much more to it. (This means that running two DHCP servers within the same segment can get quite messy.) In your case, you would need a single router that was connected to both WAN connections, instead of two. (If you can't find a dedicated one, some people use an old PC with pfSense as a multi-WAN ...


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It is a race condition, and whichever router responds with an IP address to the device, wins its connection. If you set both of your routers to use the same subnet, then you could potentially have the failover that you're looking for. I may be wrong on how it's fully set up though. What you can do is set the two routers on your network to the same IP ...


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Try releasing the DHCP lease from the rPi: # dhclient -r eth0 Then request another address: # dhclient eth0


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If available in the repository there is dhcpdump from man page: SYNOPSIS dhcpdump [-h regular-expression] -i interface DESCRIPTION This command parses the output of tcpdump to display the dhcp-packets for easier checking and debugging. USAGE dhcpdump -i /dev/fxp0 If you want to filter a specific Client Hardware Address (...


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Assuming you have an "off-the-shelf" home router rather then something serious which allows you a lot of control of the DHCP server, you should be able to find the range of IP's allocated in the router - usually this will be a small subset of the available IP's available for the subnet. You should be able to change this subset, save, restart everything as ...


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Default Gateway = the device your computer(s) will use to acces another network than the one they are currently on (also called "router") DHCP = the device your computer(s) will contact when they try to get an IP address for your network What that means is, the "Default Gateway" and "DHCP" roles are completely independent an can be installed on the same ...


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DHCP Lease Expire Time (IPV4)? Could someone tell me what this does? Lets start with DHCP what DHCP does. In very simple terms it comes down to this: New device does a DHCP req ("Hi, I am new here! This is my serial number. Someone please give me all the information needed to get on the local network") DHCP server: "Hi new device. Here are the settings ...


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ISP's are just like large companies that are assigned IP addresses. They can decide how many of their customers have a dedicated IP address and how many have dynamic IP. For example in Romania you have to pay for static IP in most ISP's. Even ISP's that provide home connection of 1 GBPS do not give you static IP by default. So many customers can connect ...


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TL;DR: Changing your public IP yourself is a bad idea or impossible. Contact your ISP. There are two possibilities for static IP: Actual static IP: The IP is configured in your box itself. You could change it by fiddling with the box settings, but the IP address is most likely hardcoded. DHCP Reservation: The box is configured to get its IP from the ISP'...


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You need to call your ISP about this. You will always have the same IP, as your ISP has assigned this IP to your hardware address. One potential option is to spoof your hardware address, however, this is not really a viable option as I'm sure your ISP would take action once they discovered that you were using bogus hardware addresses.


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As per this Q/A, they do indeed use hardcoded servers. You will probably find that many devices won’t accept anything but the IP configuration from a DHCP server. However, you can hijack the hardcoded hostname(s): time.asia.apple.com time.apple.com time.euro.apple.com Simply use your internal DNS to route these to your NTP server’s IP address and you ...



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