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In short the general rule of thumb is no the DHCP server will not know about this Static IP and if hands that same IP out to another device you will have an IP conflict which can take both devices offline. You have a two options really: Check what the DHCP scope is and make sure your static IP is outside of that scope for example if your device hands out ...


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In some networks , there are some hosts that need to have fixed IPs addresses , say for example : a server , printer...etc which will facilitate the access to them for users and applications , and in order for your network to use the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) which attribute IPS to hosts) and for those fixed hosts to use a fixed IP , there ...


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"DHCP address reservation" specifically means that the router will always offer the given address whenever the host asks for one using the DHCP auto-configuration protocol. However, only DHCP offers were made static, but the router's IP→MAC neighbour cache (aka the ARP cache) is still filled in dynamically using ARP. Meaning, if you bypass DHCP and ...


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On Windows you can use ipconfig /all to find the DUID & IAID: Ethernet adapter VirtualBox Host-Only Network: Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : Description . . . . . . . . . . . : VirtualBox Host-Only Ethernet Adapter Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No Autoconfiguration Enabled . ...


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I think you need to slowdown and take break :-), reset all then start all over again. start with your main machine (TM) set it up and make sure it is working and then set up the next one.


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Distilled from comments… The best solution I've ever found for a Virgin SuperHub is to dumb it down to pure Modem mode & set up a decent Router behind it. Saves having to bridge the good router & stops the SuperHub's tiny brain having to think at all. You will lose the SuperHub's WiFi but I think it's a fair swap to finally be in full control of ...


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Yes, if you have a wifi router plugged into the cable modem, the cable modem thinks only one device is connected. Additionally, all wi-fi routers (that I know of) come with a feature which mirrors the MAC address of your current computer so that the cable modem thinks it is just your same old computer still connected, not a new machine of any kind.


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You'll want to install a DHCP and DNS server. Since you're on Windows, you'll need to look for an open source solution for both. Only Windows Server (e.g. 2003, 2008, Server 10) has built-in software for DHCP and DNS. Install the DHCP server and DNS server, and set up each. The computer itself should have a static IP assigned to operate properly, and should ...


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Some bugs probably, but should be enough to do what's needed. run as root. #!/bin/bash ARPCOUNT=10 LOCALNET=`route | grep default | awk '{print $2}' | cut -f1-3 -d'.'` NETMASK=`route | grep default | awk '{print $3}'` DEVICE=`route | grep default | awk '{print $8}'` for ((xval=100; xval<254; xval++ )) ; do CURIP=$LOCALNET.$xval arping -c ...



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