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78

UPDATED ANSWER: Do NOT delete this folder (see below for work-around) Why Not? There have been conflicting reports about whether the absence of this folder (as a consequence of deleting it) will actually and in all cases cause issues with the visual studio installation, i.e. during normal operation, during reinstall, patch/upgrade, repair install, or ...


29

I've found the same folder on my laptop after installing VS2012. I tried renaming that folder to '__Package Cache'. When I then tried to uninstall VS2012 the uninstall process failed to start. More information is available here.


15

Pretty simple, just head over to the Display Properties -> Desktop -> Customize Desktop option and remove the checkbox. I've written up a guide on how to do it: Stop the Annoying "There are unused icons on your desktop" Popup Balloon


11

I noticed this folder after I installed Visual Studio 2012, in my case everything in it contained to the Visual Studio 2012 installation, I manually removed it and everything seems to be working including Visual Studio.


10

Selecting this option basically compresses all old DLL and SYS files in the Windows folder that hasn't been accessed recently or ever. It uses the normal built in NTFS compression, and to be very honest on today's hard-drives has little or no impact on the folder sizes. These files already take up minimal space. The How-To Geek has an article here ...


9

Simple conceptually, and has a low risk of error: mkdir TO_DELETE mv * TO_DELETE mv TO_DELETE/var_opt TO_DELETE/var_log . rm -rf TO_DELETE You can also use ksh's extended globs: rm -rf !(var_opt|var_log) These are also available in bash if you enable them: shopt -s extglob rm -rf !(var_opt|var_log) Ditto in zsh: setopt ksh_glob rm -rf ...


8

Where are you looking for this source code? MacPorts downloads source packages and stores them in /opt/local/var/macports/distfiles. If you did port clean --all installed then your system should have gotten rid of these source pacakges. You may do better to run port clean --all all to get rid of source packages of software that you may have uninstalled. ...


7

menu Start > All Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Cleanup does exactly what you want, it will walk you through the whole process. If you want something more in depth CCleaner is a great free program for this. You can also automate both of these with scheduled tasks. Let's document this so you can see that it does clean %Temp%. My Temp folder: ...


7

You really don't need special software to do a straight delete of all files in any folder, this can be done with a simple batch file or from the command line: del /s /q /f %temp%\* del /s /q /f %windir%\temp\* The first will get the current user temp folder, the other will get the system temp folder that some applications like to use. EDIT: Per request, ...


7

The correct answer seems to be that if you delete it, VS 2012 will fail to uninstall, but it is otherwise not needed. Therefore: You can leave the files there. Everything will work but it will use lots of disk space. You can delete the files, and if you want to uninstall VS 2012, you can re-run the original installer to put the files back, then uninstall. ...


6

All the software's installers are saved in this folder. It would fail when you try to uninstall a software after deleting this folder.


6

Now I know you're missing your 10.3 install disc, but to really do this properly, that's just what you need. More on that in a moment. The typical sequence would be to boot from your install disc, run Disk Utility to reformat (and depending on how paranoid you are, do a 1- 7- or 23-time random-whole-disk-rewrite—that's basically what @Nathan Adams' ...


5

I'm not a big fan of the Windows Disk Cleanup feature. I run the freeware CCleaner (formerly CrapCleaner) to clean things up every week or so. It depends on what I've been doing, since some activities create a lot of temporary files. When you have a lot of temporary files, performance can be affected noticeably, which is the main reason I clean things up ...


5

After an update to XP SP3 it could be that your Windows directory is full with the backup files that are not deleted after the install completes. You can safely delete any folder under C:\Windows\ that begins with "$NtUninstall", the only side effect is that you will not be able to revert back to SP2 or whatever you have before. This can save a couple of ...


5

The Installer directory contains details of programs you have installed. So it will grow and grow as you install new programs. To reduce it you could uninstall some programs you don't use. The sheer size of this directory suggest to me that either you must have a lot of programs installed or there are lots of duplicate files. How many programs do you have ...


5

Soluto and AutoRuns should help you a bit with the more advanced aspects of cleaning up and optimizing your computer. These in conjunction with Black Viper's list of services and suggested configurations. It's difficult to be more specific because the reasons for your slowdown are unique to how you use your computer. But using these tools should give you a ...


5

SpaceSniffer brings up the standard Windows context menu on a right-click, so yes, it can delete. It updates instantly as well (even from things outside the application, which is awesome to watch!)


5

No. If you delete this folder, you won’t be able to uninstall (and possibly update) Visual Studio.


4

They use different methods, and the effectiveness may depend on the drive. The former uses the 'newer' ATA secure erase command and the latter just overwrites it with zeros. For really old drives that don't have ata secure erase supported, the latter is the only way to do it - it just overwrites the drive with zeros and in many cases thats enough (though ...


4

The "Temporary Files" folder that Disk Cleanup is referring to is the one pointed to by the environment variable %TEMP%. You can go directly to this folder by typing %TEMP% in the Run box or in the address bar in Windows Explorer. Disk Cleanup's list of "places to cleanup" is stored in the registry key ...


4

I found WinDirStat a while back and found it to be awesome. You can delete files from within the application. You can also do it outside and then right-click any part of the directory tree and have it refresh it quickly. http://windirstat.info/


4

Short answer: Traditional HDD (mechanical): no SSD: yes Long answer: A traditional mechanical hard drive will lose a small amount of life span, but it's so negligible that it really doesn't matter at all. Doing this on a SSD, however, makes absolutely no sense. Not only will it decrease the lifespan of the disk (although TRIM is supposed to help a little ...


4

You don't want to manually remove entries from those folders. Windows 7 saves it's installer packages (much like a c:\i386 folder on an XP machine) locally so that you don't need to insert the win7 disk when installing updates or running repairs. Also, Windows 7 uses a central directory to store most of the files that make up the operating system itself ...


4

Start -> Control Panel -> Add or Remove -> Install/remove components (search the left side. There you will find it. (If I remember clearly, it's at the bottom of the left column, but it won't hurt to check them out. :)) You can produce a minimalist ISO image with NLite. That way you can tear down all the unneccessary stuff. I warn you beforehand; your ...


4

It may have little impact on free space, but in this day and age the disparity between processor speed and disk speed is so great that turning compression on is a no-brainer. The access will in most cases be faster than access to files with no compression. The only exception is very small files and files that are compressed anyway, such as ZIP or MP3. You ...


3

In all honesty, unless you are an extremely paranoid person that worries if their computer were physically stolen, someone might recover stuff you deleted, i don't think you need to worry about secure delete. What it does is simply zero out the part of the drive where the data was residing, effectively scrubbing the remains of the file. In most cases, when ...


3

Its usually better not to mess up with deleting these files manually, and instead leave this task to either windows disk-cleanup, or other disk cleaning tools. The one I personally use and can recommend you is the ccleaner (http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner). CCleaner can help you automatically find obsolete files in a program and deletes them for you.


3

Use Disk Cleanup with the Clean up system files option.


2

You cannot delete the Program Data folder. Instead look at other options. Some of them will be: Disable hibernation and delete the hidden hiberfil.sys Move the page file from C:\ drive to an alternate drive. Run CCleaner and see if helps clean up some stuff. See if you can uninstall some junk / obselete / now unwanted programs. Check for Memory.dmp file in ...


2

Is it possible to manually delete C:\ProgramData\Microsoft folder or at the very least reduce the size of this folder without breaking Microsoft programs? No. If there are other ways to reduce the size of this folder, please detail the necessary steps to take. There is one possibility. That is the default location for the windows search ...



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