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-1

Instead of attaching new disks you can always increase your current volume sizes. You just need to snapshot your current disk, create a new volume with more space and then attach back to your instance using the same mount point used before. In any case: both expanding disks or allocating new ones. Amazon has a pretty clear documentation with step-by-step ...


2

Following the short & sweet approach my oversimplified answer (strictly restricted to your main confusion) is: As long as your OS has enough (for worst case scenarios) space to fulfill its duties like paging/swapping/etc. Other software also have sufficient space for their respective needs. Hard disk is defragmented. Then you can't tell difference ...


2

The product TreeSize Professional has an interesting feature to track down increases of used disk space: It has the ability to compare the current state with a previous one and show the differences. The previous state can either be a scan exported from TreeSize or a Windows shadow copy which Windows e.g. creates along with a system restore point. A 30 ...


5

All of the other answers are technically correct - however I've always found that this simple example explains it best. Sorting things is really easy if you have lots of space... but difficult if you don't have the space... computers need the space too! This classic "15 puzzle" is tricky/time consuming because you only have 1 free square to shuffle the ...


9

Somewhere inside a traditional hard disk is a spinning metal platter where the individual bits and bytes are actually encoded. As data is added to the platter, the disk controller stores it on the outside of the disk first. As new data is added space is used moving towards the inside of the disk last. With this in mind, there are two effects that cause disk ...


4

Flash disks can definitely get slower when they are full or fragmented, though the mechanisms for slowdown are unlike any that would occur with a physical hard drive. A typical flash memory chip will be divided into some number of erase blocks, each of which consists of a large number (hundreds, if not thousands) of write pages, and will support three ...


2

One effect on spinning drives that I haven't seen mentioned: Access speed and data transfer speed is different on different parts of a disk. A disk rotates at fixed speed. The tracks at the outside of a disk are longer and therefore can hold more data per track than the tracks at the inside. If your drive can read 100 MB/sec from the outermost tracks, the ...


5

A computer that's had very little disk space, on a spinning mechanical hard drive, for a significant amount of time, will generally become slower as file fragmentation grows. Increased fragmentation means slow reads – very slow in extreme cases. Once a computer is in this state, freeing disk space will not actually fix the problem. You'd also need to ...


278

Here, I wrote a book by accident. Get some coffee first. Why does emptying disk space speed up computers? It doesn't, at least not on its own. This is a really common myth. The reason it is a common myth is because filling up your hard drive often happens at the same time as other things that traditionally could slow down† your computer. SSD ...


20

In addition to Nathanial Meek's explanation for HDDs, there is a different scenario for SSDs. SSDs are not sensitive to scattered data because the access time to any place on the SSD is the same. The typical SSD access time is 0.1ms versus a typical HDD access time of 10 to 15ms. It is, however, sensitive to data that is already written on the SSD Unlike ...


3

You pretty much nailed it. You can think of a SATA HDD as a half duplex communications medium (That is, it can only accept or transmit data at a time. Not both.) so when the drive is held up for an extended time looking for a free location to write to, it can't read any data to you. As a rule of thumb, you shouldn't load your drives up over 80% capacity for ...


1

I found a good and easy solution for my problem. Slizzered's last paragraph about virtual machines gave me a hint. You can use qemu software without having to actually load a virtual machine. I found the relevant information here and here. First you have to create a copy on write (COW) file of your image. This is going to use your original_500GB_file.img as ...


1

The easiest way would actually be using BTRFS or ZFS and their snapshot capabilities, yes. I didn't work too much with BTRFS (only ZFS right now), but the rollback should be no problem. (I'm going to write ZFS-based, but it should work rather similarly for BTRFS) Before you start the recovery process, you take a "snapshot" of your current file-system that ...


1

Another alternative is agedu which breaks down disk space by last-access time, which makes it easier to locate space wasting files. It even works on a server without X Windows by serving temporary web pages so usage can be analysed remotely, with graphs. Assuming the IP address of the server is 192.168.1.101, you can type this on the command line of the ...


0

How are you using the Docker containers and how are users/groups dispersed (more to the mysql errors) Also, for docker are they sharing anything on the host or are they purely self contained?



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