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The directory you're describing (not a file) is likely to be a directory of installation files for a Windows Update. They're usually safe to delete, because they only appear when they've been fully downloaded, unpacked, and applied. They're usually deleted after the fact, but in certain cases, Windows fails to. You should be safe deleting this directory.


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Sometimes $patchcache$ consumes a great deal of "Installer" folder. You can check how big is your "C:\Windows\Installer\$PatchCache$" folder (mine was 6GB after 1.5 years). Basically it boils down to "If you have original installers, then you could delete it". rmdir /q /s "C:\WINDOWS\Installer\$PatchCache$" (as admin of course) read about it: Can I delete ...


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Microsoft does not recommend you move the %AppData% folder out of the system drive. You can use TreeSize Free see if there other ways to remove files. Sometimes hibernation and pagefile.sys are candidates on the c:\ You also have %AppData%\Local\Temp which could be redirected to your non-SSD drive. You should really consider getting a bigger SSD. You want ...


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I have consistently found that for Samsung 120GB, this is not guaranteed. I have found less free space after compressing the drive in the majority of cases. Even on a multi-boot machine and compressing as a non-system drive before reboot. The data would be 95% pre-compressed (BF4 etc). The disks are over 90% full. This leads me to believe there is an ...


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I don't think that compression would be all that bad on an SSD. Your operating system uses a temporary holding area for data that it needs to fetch when applications are loaded. Compressed files are decompressed and are loaded into this holding area. In Windows, this file is typically found on the root (C: presumably) of the drive. This file is called ...


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Sounds like you have room on the left of the partition you want to extend, and no room on the right. You can move a partition to the left and then extend it to the right. Windows may do that, if not then Easeus partition manager(which is free) or others e.g. paragon partition manager(also free version). You should use specific terminology when talking about ...


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Maybe you should look in the Windows Native tool to view partitions instead of using Easus? Go to Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management > Storage > Disk Management Check the state of Disk 0 (and maybe post a printscreen), do you find the 50 GB in a "wierd partition" maybe?


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Do not remove manually. The proper way to do it is sudo apt-get clean sudo apt-get autoclean sudo apt-get autoremove



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