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2

KVM Extenders are used to connect a console(keyboard,mouse/screen) to a computer box, with a long cable e.g. cat5 cable. You can combine a KVM Extender to a KVM switch. So you can have a set of computer boxes, a long cable, could be 30 metres away, and then a keyboard monitor and mouse.


3

If everyone is using laptops, then you can connect to the workstations using any remote desktop tool, like Window's built in Remote Desktop, or use VNC, or even TeamViewer. These options are far more flexible than running cables.


0

I found two possible solutions. 1. You could change the default window size on a per application basis. To force Windows to record the size of a window and set it as the default size for that program each time it's opened, simply re-size the window to your preferred size, then depress and hold the CTRL key while you click the red X to close it. The ...


14

I had the same question in the 2007, because my computer doesn't supported my default tv resolution 1366x768 and I found this: WHY does 1366 x 768 exist? This has to do with a 1 megapixel processing boundary of easily available chipsets for VRAM ( video memory ) and video processing display drivers. Its a standard memory size of importance to chip ...


50

At the time the first computer wide screens became popular, the usual resolution on 4:3 panels was 1024x768 (XGA display standard). So, for simplicity and backward compatibility, the XGA resolution was kept as a basis to make the WXGA resolution, so that XGA graphics could be displayed easily on WXGA screens. Just extending the width and keeping the same ...


153

According to Wikipedia (emphasis mine): The basis for this otherwise odd seeming resolution is similar to that of other "wide" standards – the line scan (refresh) rate of the well-established "XGA" standard (1024x768 pixels, 4:3 aspect) extended to give square pixels on the increasingly popular 16:9 widescreen display ratio without having to ...


16

768 is the sum of two powers of 2 (512 + 256), and 1366 is 16/9 times 768, rounded up to the next integer. But only the person who selected that resolution can answer the "why". Some people just like powers of 2. Also, 768 times 1366 is just over one Mebipixel (2^20), which is about 1.05 Megapixel (1.05 * 10^6). 768 times 1365 is just under that, so ...


1

I believe these will show up as two separate X displays (typically 0.0 and 0.1) because they're on separate graphics cards. Try doing: DISPLAY=:0.1 xrandr See also https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Multihead You can use xinerama, to use both simultaneously, or you can use traditional multi-head (but then you can't move windows between displays).


1

[ 2.696] (II) RADEON(G0): GPU accel disabled or not working, using shadowfb for KMS` [ 3.144] (EE) RADEON(G0): drmmode_do_crtc_dpms cannot get last vblank counter` in your Xorg.log seems to indicate a failure with your Radeon X1600 graphic card. firmware-linux-nonfree should be installed, providing the needed proprietary firmware for your ATi GPU. If it ...


4

The power cables should be interchangeable between a PC and a Display. Check to make sure your display cable isn't loose and is still good. Otherwise it is possible you may have damaged either your video card / port on the PC or the Display.


0

As of the current version, I've figured it out. I'm using the Orion theme, which prevents it from being taken past the left side of the screen. Go to your settings, turn it off, and it'll revert to system titlebars and it'll work.


4

As @Wyzard says, computers talk to monitors via DDC and this uses 4 pins on the vga. See the pinout on wikipedia. A working vga cable needs all the pins wired independently from each, and also from the cable shielding to the chassis, i.e the metal cover of the plugs and sockets. Only pins 4 and 11 can be missing or not cabled. Inside a monitor there is a ...


3

Detecting a monitor's resolution depends on information provided by the monitor itself via DDC. In a VGA cable, this uses several pins and wires that are separate from the ones used for the actual video signal. A cheap VGA cable might be missing some of these wires (to save on costs), or the wire might be present but broken (due to wear & tear).


0

Simple Answer, stop using VGA cables, use HDMI or DisplayPort Long answer: well quality and length of vga cables has alot to say about resolution


0

Use my own fork of Brightness Menulet It supports auto adjustment based on the ambient light sensor Link: http://github.com/MuhammadHewedy/BrightnessMenulet


1

Display port is digital only. You cannot connect VGA to it without some active component which understands display port and translates it to VGA. DVI-I is a version of DVI which has both the regular digital DVI output and the pins for ancient analog output. It your card supplies the analog part then you can use a simple convertor to connect VGA to this. ...


0

Hook the VGA output to one monitor. Use an adapter to convert DisplayPort to VGA, and use that to connect the other monitor.


0

There is not a practical way to fix that and you are likely to make it worse by trying. If the hole is only in a thin surface film, you might be able to press it flat, but if the film has been distorted (stretched), it probably won't stay flat. You might find that over time, the film may flatten a little on its own. I would not try to soften it with ...


0

First of all: Are you calibrating with a hardware sensor? Then: This depends on the GPU and how much LUTs (LookUp Tables) it has. You can easily test if your GPU has got enough (more than one) LUT: Download this tool and open it: http://support.datacolor.com/index.php?/Knowledgebase/Article/View/1431/90/gammatest---win If you're able to turn magenta each ...


0

I am sorry I do not have enough reputation to comment and this is kind of old topic. However out of curiosity, how exactly did you manage to monitor /proc filesystem ? I have been looking for a long time for how to asynchronously monitor(interrupt, signal...) /proc and /sys instead of keep polling ( not poll() function). If you can, please show me your ...


0

This isn't possible. Laptops don't have video inputs, just outputs. Unless you have some kind of remote desktop software installed and configured (TeamViewer, VNC, configured RDP etc), you'll have to find a regular monitor and use it.


0

Open the Power Manager. Select the Display tab. On the left where is says "Blank after", move the slider all the way to the left under Plugged In, or the corresponding power type, batter or plugged in. This is assuming it's not the screen saver that is making your monitor go blank. This is for Linux Mint 17.2, so I'm not sure if it will be the exact same ...


0

Had this issue with my computer at work. VGA cables were stressed from feet and the tugging is what most likely caused the cables to loosen up. Upon tightening cables the streaking was corrected (images would streak perfectly to the right).


2

As said before, on an lcd screen you can only choose multiples of your native resolution to avoid the blurry effect. So for your 1920*1080 screen you should lower your resolution to 960*540 which is much too low for you I guess.


1

Run the Windows Experience Index Benchmark. When the benchmark completes, assuming your graphics adapter is up to it, Windows will enable Desktop Composition which is exactly what you need to enjoy smooth desktop animation. After that, you can tweak some extra settings if you want, but the above is the most important thing as it will make the Desktop ...


5

LCD monitors will only ever look nice and crisp when set to their native resolution. In your case, 1920x1080. If things are too small to read, you're best bet is to keep the 1920x1080 resolution and adjust the screen "DPI" setting in your OS. You haven't specified what OS you're running, but assuming it's Windows: Windows Vista Windows 7 Windows 8/8.1


4

If you select a non-native resolution, the driver has to calculate every pixel value from the original image where it corresponds to a fraction of a pixel. The interpolation error of up-sampling results in the blurry impression you have noticed. The error can be reduced if you select a resolution with the same aspect ratio (width / hight) as your native ...


0

Can the signal cables be swapped or are those models with no detachable cabling? If you can swap them try different cables. Thy using the one from the monitor NOT showing "No signal" message. Does the monitor NOT showing the "no Signal" message displays picture for several seconds after powering up? And then it's blank screen (like when turned off) with ...


0

Just doing some raw calculations: 12 displays at 60Hz with a resolution of 2048x1536 takes requires 6.33GB/s of uncompressed bandwidth (assuming 24-bit RGB). This is much faster than USB 3.0's raw limit of 5 Gbits/s (or 625 MB/s), even before taking USB 3.0's protocol overhead into account. Thunderbolt 3.0 is specified to have 40Gbits/S, which is only ...


0

If you are using bash as your default shell, put the following line into your .bashrc file inside your home folder: export LANG=en_US.UTF-8


1

I have found there to be less problems with HiDPI on Linux than expected. Most modern DEs will scale correctly, many have a config option that simply doubles the size of everything if the scaling does not work by default. I currently am running a HiDPI laptop with XFCE and GNOME no problems


1

In Linux: xrandr --output DVI-0 (your output) --brightness 2 (or the value you want) In Windows: Calibrate your display color (Type "Calibrate display color" in the Windows searchbox)


1

With cracked screen all you can do is to replace it. And LED LCD is still LCD. LED means that backlight for the screen is coming from LEDs, not old-style-CCFL. For him or for laptop makes absolutely no difference from service point of view. Except for maybe he's trying to sell you outdated part no one wants anymore. Change your service supplier. And to ...


0

Apparently (and I discovered it by chance) holding the "Auto" button for a few instant is enough. Completely counter-intuitive and undocumented, but that's it. I hope this helps people with the same issue, I had a fit of rage after realizing that such a simple issue was ending up taking so much of my time.


0

According to the manual the factory reset is done via the "Recall" menu item in the OSD. But you're saying the OSD won't come up since it's stuck in HDMI mode. One thing to try (if oyu haven't already) is unplugging it form the wall an letting it sit for a couple/few minutes, then plug it back in and try again. If the OSD still doesn't come up, I'd ...


0

One tool I have used successfully (not on a pi though), is xcalib from the package of the same name. You can use it to change the gamma, eg: xcalib -gc 1.1 -a You can repeat this. To cancel use xcalib -clear Another useful option is making the whole screen reverse-video: xcalib -invert -a It is intended to work with icc profiles, but I have only ...


0

Mid 2012 MacBook Air here. Seeing the same issue. There's a rectangular bar in the middle of the screen that is flickering. Last time it was red, but can be different colors. It's about 100 x 30 pixels or so. As others have changed out all the hardware with no results I am guessing it's a software issue. Probably the graphics driver in Yosemite.


1

It is a 17" crt style monitor? You could replace it , even with the many other CRT monitors that are being recycled and still very usable. A newer LCD monitor could save as much electrical utility costs over its lifetime to pay for itself. Any of the issues with colors being hugely wrong, like whites being majenta, or yellow or cyan, can be caused Only by a ...


0

N.b. it is difficult to answer based on the information you provided; that said I will try to answer as best I can. Connecting an external monitor to a laptop may not test what you are trying to test, since the external connection is a separate one from the the connection to the integrated screen. There could be something wrong with the internal connection ...


1

Sounds to me like you're being cheated. If you plugged up an external monitor to the VGA or HDMI port and it displayed without any distortion then yes, the GPU (graphics controller) is good. If it displayed crazy colors and distortion like your screen then it would be bad. Best bet for you is to have the screen replaced. A GPU fix/replacement or whatever ...


1

WiDi does support some non-Intel adapters, mostly BCM43xx, but if your adapter is not in the list, there is no way around it. Miracast is a little different. There is no Miracast support on Windows 7 so its Intel WiDi(v3.5+) again. However Windows 8.1 has Miracast support builtin so its possible to get Miracast working without WiDi. The display adapter has ...


1

Yes. The possible size of your RDP session screen size is always determined by the video capabilities connecting computer, not by the machine you are accessing remotely. An RDP session uses a virtual video driver on the host computer which is completely independent from any actual connected displays. In fact, if this weren't so it wouldn't be possible to ...


0

Apparently my last video driver update fixed this issue. When I RDP'd to the system, I could set the "use all my monitors" option, and it worked!


0

I presume your LCD panel on the laptop is broken ? Why else would you try to get into the BIOS on external monitor only... First: In case the laptop has multiple external monitor outputs: Try them all. It could be that the BIOS is explicitly configured for "LCD+VGA" or for "LCD+DVI" and your monitor is connected to the other plug. (Windows ignores these ...


0

Are you saying that you don't want to use the laptop screen at all? You are likely to need to change something in the BIOS to allow the secondary monitor to be used as the primary, however you might need to disconnect your external monitor initially, make the relevant change(s) in the BIOS and then reconnect the monitor. I hth, although maybe a little more ...



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