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13

It's used when registering COM components (one type of DLL) that various applications require. By registering a DLL, you are adding information to a central directory (the Registry) for use by Windows. The information typically includes a "friendly name" for the component, which makes it easier to use from within another program, and the full path to the ...


12

Use IconsExtract from NirSoft. It scans a folder you select and can list any icons and files which contain icons.


12

Check this site for Windows 8, Windows 7, or Windows XP Welcome to DLL information site for Windows XP/7/8. This site was built by scanning all DLL files located in system32 directory of Windows XP with SP3 and creating (with automatic script) a Web page for each DLL with all found infromation. Each DLL information page includes: Version information - ...


12

I ran into this issue, too. Alexey Ivanov's response didn't quite help me, but it did, however, inspire me to investigate C:\Users\x\AppData\Local\Temp. As usual, error messages were only half-useful. In my case, the DLL wasn't missing--the installer didn't have permissions to access the folder. I didn't try running the installer as an administrator--this ...


11

I know of these: %SystemRoot%\explorer.exe %SystemRoot%\system32\accessibilitycpl.dll %SystemRoot%\system32\ddores.dll %SystemRoot%\system32\gameux.dll %SystemRoot%\system32\imageres.dll %SystemRoot%\System32\mmcndmgr.dll %SystemRoot%\system32\mmres.dll %SystemRoot%\system32\mstscax.dll %SystemRoot%\system32\netshell.dll %SystemRoot%\system32\networkmap.dll ...


9

A DLL file is not by it self executable, though it may contain executable code. A DLL (Dynamic-Link Library) contains code, data, resources etc. usable by other programs. You need an EXE file for the operating system to execute code within DLL files, like "RUNDLL.EXE" or "RUNDLL32.exe" in windows.


8

Dependency Walker can do this. Or on a running application, Process Explorer can list the DLLs with CtrlD.


7

DLLs are dynamic-link libraries: Dynamic-link library, or DLL, is Microsoft's implementation of the shared library concept in the Microsoft Windows and OS/2 operating systems. These libraries usually have the file extension DLL, OCX (for libraries containing ActiveX controls), or DRV (for legacy system drivers). See Dynamic-link library ...


6

You will be missing a dll on which the one you're trying to register is dependent. You can use Dependency Walker to check this.


6

This DLL is part of the Wise Installer as far as I know. Some programs aren't particularly good about removing the temporary files they create; it's really nothing to worry about. And by the way, you should install some antivirus software; you never think you need it until you get bit :)


6

msvcr71.dll is Microsoft Visual C++ Runtime Library for Visual C++ .NET 2003. It comes as part of .NET Framework 1.1.


5

To register a dll, you open a command box as admin and then use regsvr32 /i <dll_name>. Tha said, your problem seems to be that you just can't copy the file. Again, open a command box as admin and do the following: ren c:\windows\system32\filename.dll c:\windows\system32\filename.old copy c:\randomlocation\filename.dll ...


5

Here is the full usage of regsvr32.


5

I'd check the date it was placed on the system and compare that with other files in the system to get clues. Search should allow you to search the entire system by date. Also, posting the name of the file here would allow some here who may be familiar with it to ID it for you.


5

The main (only?) problem is compatibility between different versions of Msvcr71.dll. Let's say 7.10.0 is slightly incompatible with 7.10.1 and an application App1 depends on the old behavior and an application App2 depends on the new behavior. Additionally both applications do not ship this C++ runtime itself. In this case one of the two applications will ...


5

According to the Wikipedia article a DLL is an executable file. In computing, an executable file causes a computer "to perform indicated tasks according to encoded instructions," as opposed to a data file that must be parsed by a program to be meaningful. Taking this definition a DLL is an executable because it contains encoded instructions to perform ...


5

Either re-install the program (the program with the missing .dll) or copy the individual .dll into the appropriate folder from another source (if for example a friend/colleague also has the program).


5

Yes, EncodePointer was introduced in Windows XP service pack 2, so it is very likely that the reason the software is not working is that you do not have this installed. However, this doesn't mean you need to hook the computer to the internet. Instead, use another computer to download service pack 3 and put it on CD or USB stick. Copy it to the hard disk ...


4

"More Information" in the article you linked to says placing the CRT in system32 "may cause problems when you run applications that are linked to a different version of the CRT on computers that do not have the correct versions of the CRT DLL installed." For example, let's say App1 requires version 2.1 of Msvcr71.dll for its SpinMyRainbowPinWheel function ...


4

You could potentially examine each .MSI file in the %SystemRoot%\Installer folder. All (?) programs that are installed through the Windows installer will add their MSI here so that they can be UNinstalled at a later time. The folder generally has a ton of stuff. If/Once you find the dll amongst those myriad of MSI packages, you will have to map the ...


4

Double Click on the "White area" just inside the border of the TaskManager window and you'll get back to Normal Task mode..


4

I started experiencing the WOW64.DLL error when my Windows updates failed. I spent a total of 9 hours battling this issue as no application or internet browser launched causing more frustration. I finally resolved this issue with the following steps: Procure a copy of WOW64.DLL located at C:\Windows\System32 from a different Windows 7 PC (I used a friend's ...


4

It would seem that your program is 32-bit, but didn't install its needed 32-bit libraries on your 64-bit OS. MSVCP100.dll, is part of the Microsoft Visual C++ runtime libraries, so ensure you install the 32-bit versions of those C++ runtime libraries. You can get them from Microsoft here: Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 Redistributable Package (x86) You may ...


4

Yep, its just like chrisF said, Here is a KB article from microsoft explaining it as well and Here is a KB article explaining what a DLL is. Think of them as library files for programs on your computer. They hold instructions on how to do different things for different programs. When you register it you are telling your computer that you have these ...


3

smackw32.dll is a library for decompressing/viewing video files generated by Bink/Smacker video technology. While you can files from sites like dll-files, I'd recommend getting the file from the game's installation CD (if you have it)


3

For native DLLs the Dependency Walker tool will show you all of the exported functions as well as id numbers and address for each function. It will also list the DLLs that the DLL directly depends on. If you are looking at a .NET/Managed DLL check out Red Gate's Reflector. It will completely disassemble the DLL and show you the code in the .NET language ...


3

The symptoms you're describing are typical for an infected system. The virus has changed system files, some of which were replaced by Windows Update. As a result the virus crashes the computer. There is no way to guess what destruction was caused on the computer by that virus. The system cannot return to "normal", since its previous state was infected and ...


3

UPX is only for native executables. There are a number of compressors for .NET executables around you could try my one RPX it does good compression even on small executables and can bundle multiple DLL(s) into a single .EXE file. However there are some limitations caused by the manner, or more precisely the order, by which .NET looks for additional ...


3

You can use Windows PowerShell: PS C:\Windows> Get-ChildItem c:\windows -include *.dll -recurse | foreach-object { "{0}" -f [System.Diagnostics.FileVersionInfo]::GetVersionInfo($_) } a few lines of example output: File: C:\windows\assembly\GAC\Microsoft.JScript\7.0.5000.0__b03f5f7f11d50a3a\Microsoft.JScript.dll InternalName: ...



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