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The depends on the resolution of Domain Names on your system. The easiest solution would be flushing the integrated cache for DNS entries in windows, by executing ipconfig /flushdns After cosulting the OS's own cache, it will ask the primary and secondary DNS server as configured in the IP settings - for a home user these settings are usually ...


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When altering DNS settings, you should always keep in mind that such changes take time to propagate over the internet. It can take from 2 to 48 hours before changes are replicated through all hops on the internet. ipconfig /flushdns can be used to renew your DNS configuration with that from your router/modem/server (depending on what your DNS servers are) ...


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Ron's (very sensible) comments about Terms of Service aside: You CAN host a server from your Home IP providing you have a static IP address. Otherwise you stand a good chance of having your IP change every time your modem re-negotiates it's connection. Which will mean that people will then be looking for your server at the wrong IP. If you're NOT on a ...


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You could set up a DNS server at home that would have an authoritative record for your domain name. You would still have to pay a registrar for a domain name. A registrar must be accredited by the top level domain registry. In the current system new registrars must pay 4,000USD plus a variable fee totaling 3,800,000USD.


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First output is the PTR record for the domain axis.com Second one means that server on ip 195.60.68.81 has 4 NS records: axis.com name server nic2.axis.com. axis.com name server nic.axis.com. axis.com name server nic4.axis.com. axis.com name server nic3.axis.com. Meaning that domain axis.com can be resolved using one of those 4 servers


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This is kind of confusing to me but I assume you are trying to go out to the internet from your home. I would plug in a system directly to the modem (the modem should offer some sort of DHCP service). And try to ping 8.8.8.8 (google DNS). If that fails or times out then it's either your modem or the line from you to your ISP. I would do this from a Linux ...



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