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4

If you're absolutely certain the issue must be with malware and nothing else, despite every reputable malware detection tool saying otherwise, there's only two options remaining: Remove the hard drive, and attach it to another system as a secondary drive. Then, use the other system to scan for and remove the malware. If option 1 fails to detect and/or ...


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If Anti-malware/bloatware is what you are looking at, here are a few: Superanti spyware Malware-bytes Combo Fix ADW cleaner CCleaner Temp File Cleaner Run Combo-Fix at the last.


3

Your situation is not unusual the slightest bit; every time a full-featured recursive resolver is started – such as BIND9 or Unbound, even the copy I've running on my laptop – it starts with just a list of root zone 'hints', and descends from there all by itself. (You said "Imagine a world where Google Public DNS doesn't exist". Ever wonder how ...


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Try uploading the midi file you are sure to have caused the problem to virustotal.com. It will show you what type of infection you have, then clean accordingly.


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Check your HOSTS file: Windows Windows 7 & Windows 8 Notepad must be run as Administrator. 1. Right click Notepad and select Run as administrator 2. When Notepad opens Click File -> Open C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\etc\hosts 3. Click Open DEFAULT hosts file is below, compare and modify. You could just replace, but backup existing first just ...


2

You're misunderstanding what the router is doing and the pages you're seeing. "LAN SETUP" This page simply configures your LAN. IP Address: This is the IP of your router as seen by your LAN - "the gateway". Subnet: This is the subnet that your LAN devices will be put on DHCP: Start-End range - this is the "pool" of addresses your DHCP server will give ...


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First, you have to understand that routers are nothing more than embedded (ultra-compact) computers with specialized networking hardware. The firmware of a router consists of the operating system, drivers, and applications that the router runs. It is essentially a disk image, just like the ones that Dell or HP use to initialize their computers before they ...


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Unlocator provides (at least) their own name server, which they say returns the normal results for "all other" services, but modifies those for supported services (like Netflix, Discovery Channel, ...). There are two basic categories of location blocking: Blocking based on different IP addresses returned by name servers based on the network you're in. ...


1

Try 127.0.0.1 which is localhost, i.e., 'me' Also, flush DNS changed after 10.6 so it depends what OS you're on 10.6 or earlier sudo dscacheutil -flushcache 10.7 or later sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder


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On your client machine, create ~/.ssh/config host box1 hostname 55.55.55.55 user bob host box2 hostname 55.55.55.56 user bob Then "ssh box1", "ssh box2" do the expected things. You can also set other options like port 2222, ForwardX11 yes, ForwardAgent yes etc.


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A router's firmware does more than just handle networking protocols. It tells the device how to operate. It decides what to do when you turn the device on. It can provide a web, telnet, ssh, etc interface for users to manage it. It contains all the custom settings you set. It does a lot more than just handle networking protocols. Think of it as the ...


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Firmware is specific to hardware and it's capabilities. This applies to routers, phones (not only smartphones), big routers, switches, bridges, you name it. There's certain part of firmware that does low-level tasks like reading from Flash/disk storage, the next part tells how to talk to radio or how to talk to an onboard LAN chip. In case of (A)DSL routers ...


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Add a CNAME for the root of ample.co which points to example.com This will only do a DNS redirect. If the server hosting example.com doesn't support the URL ample.co in its list of header addresses, it won't display a page. Another option would be to have an HTTP server for ample.com which does an HTTP Redirect to example.com.


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Your issue Anto sounds similar to what one of my users had about a month or two ago. Though not precisely the same, it's similar enough for you to try and use the techniques we used for yourself. In her case, Outlook would connect fine for a few minutes after opening and then give her a certificate error message that there was a problem with the "proxy ...


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Reset your router, completely. This means not just power cycling, but using the reset button as detailed in the manual. It is very likely the DNS server settings on your router have been manipulated. This is possible by simply browsing to a malicious website when the router is vulnerable (bugs, backdoors, you name it). No traces (except in the browsing ...


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Check your proxy settings. In Internet Explorer>Tools menu>Internet Options>Connections tab>LAN Settings make sure Use a proxy server for your LAN isn't selected. Failing that, you need to establish whether the problem here is with your web browser(s) or a networking issue (both which could be caused by malware). Try to establish a connection Google's ...


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This is what your router's DNS server does. It remembers which websites you have visited in the past and stores its IP address. If it doesn't resolve, it'll try to resolve it through the internet. If this is not desired, you can edit your local hosts file and add the domains and ip addresses locally. Do note that even if you store the DNS's locally, ...


1

I've had a similar problem on my Windows clients and I use a script that OpenVPN runs after connecting the VPN: @netsh interface ipv4 add dnsservers name="YourVPNInterfaceName" address=YourCompanyDNSIP index=1 validate=no YourVPNInterfaceName is the display name of TUN/TAP network interface that your VPN is being run on. To force OpenVPN to use specific ...


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I assume you have configured your PC to use your router as the principal DNS server, and for the looks of that page, I think your router would only respond to DNS queries corresponding to subdomains of "westel.com". Try to reach www.joelchristophel.com.westel.com to check if that redirects you to Bing If that works, change the domain name to ...


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You've not pasted in all the output. You should see that A.COM, the one you want, is on the IANA whois server. Do this then: $ whois -h whois.iana.org a.com % IANA WHOIS server % for more information on IANA, visit http://www.iana.org % This query returned 1 object domain: A.COM organisation: Internet Assigned Numbers Authority created: ...


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Well. Apparently what you're asking for isn't that trivial as it seems. Two options I can think of to consider. DNS Server For a reason like yours I don't think it's worth it (yet you can try if you want to learn something). Batch/PowerShell Script You can think of simple script that will resolve gtxxxxxxx.database.windows.net through DNS and then map IP ...


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Seems like all you need is text expansion, check out Breevy or something similiar: http://www.16software.com/breevy/ Breevy is a text expander for Windows that helps you type faster and more accurately by allowing you to abbreviate long words and phrases -- saving you time and money. Simply define an abbreviation for a longer piece of text, like eml for ...


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I answered another question quite similar to yours at Unable to use internet due to suspected DNS malware. There I told my own story of how one of our users had a similar experience. Though the symptons are not 100% the same as yours, there are enough similarities for you to follow the techniques I used in helping my user. In addition, I see that your user ...


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You don't need DNS: The most trivial solution is to simply distribute a hosts file to all your computers: # /etc/hosts 127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost 192.168.1.2 orange 192.168.1.7 banana



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