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2

You are trying to access VirtualHost based websites by IP. The problem with that is that curl doesn't the hostname it's trying to access to the webserver, so the webserver doesn't know which page to serve (google.com might also host gmail.com, but it doesn't know what to give you because curl doesn't ask). To let curl use a hostname, you could modify your ...


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This is normal to happen. The problem is not a firewall at ISP level, but simply your router. When you Point to an address from inside your LAN to a public IP that is inside your lan, the following happens: Your PC -> Your Router -> Internet -> Your Router -> Your other PC. The problem is that when a connection to the internet is then redirected back to ...


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Routers typically don't route back to the internal servers. If you have a server running DD-WRT or a similar O/S you may be able to enable hairpin routing to do this. Your router may allow you to configure routeback which enables hairpinning. Your router is likely forwarding the DNS request out to your dynamic DNS provider. Some routers allow you to ...


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First of all, scan your computer with anti-malware software. I'm aware you've already tried with some apps, I suggest you also run a check with adwcleaner, it's a freeware and portable alternative. Here are some useful steps to solve this kind of issue: Use antimalware and antivirus software (✓). Check that no suspicious or unwanted software is lodaded at ...


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quite simply - www0.sun.ac.za is a registered dns record (IP is 146.232.66.100), take a look at: http://network-tools.com/default.asp?prog=dnsrec&host=www0.sun.ac.za a dns record doesn't have to be www.xxx.com or similar, it can be anything... try to think of it as "ac" is a record within "za", "sun" is a record within "ac", "www0" is a record within ...


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No-ip has been seized by microsoft and 22 no-ip domains (like zapto.org) are down for a while. Read this: http://www.noip.com/blog/2014/06/30/ips-formal-statement-microsoft-takedown/


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Open up CMD with Administrator Privileges, then type netsh If you want to change DNS address only means..then try this interface ip set dns “Local Area Connection” static 192.168.1.1 Here, Local Area Connection is your Ethernet Card's name. If you want to change the IP address also then interface ip set address name=”Local Area Connection” static ...


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dig, host, and nslookup all bypass the system name resolver, and query DNS directly. Thus, they won't see names defined in /etc/hosts (unless they're also defined in the DNS service), or any mDNS (aka Bonjour) .local names, or Computer entries in directory services, or... If you want to see what the system resolver sees, the best tool is dscacheutil. ...


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This has certainly nothing to do with your pc/OS/router. I run several Linux systems, none of them replied the way yours does. As pointed out already, this is, most likely, a trick played by your ISP. There are two things that you can do about this. On the one hand, you can study your ISP's behaviour by downloading, installing and running Namebench, a ...


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If the DNS response time is that large you should fix the DNS settings in your network. Have a look at /etc/resolv.conf and check if the nameserver(s) listed there are still available. If not, add a working DNS server (on top). You could use google's DNS servive for example: nameserver 8.8.8.8 If you need, for any reason, the slow DNS servers, this could ...


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If you only have a few servers, or the list is not going to change frequently, I'd recommend using /etc/hosts and adding the domains there, like this: 127.0.0.1 server.com 127.0.0.1 server2.com 127.0.0.1 server3.com Of course, this wouldn't block a direct connection by IP - is that something you need to prevent too?


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If you've an ordinary NAT/PAT configuration, when you attempt to make a connection from an inside, private networked host, to its neighbour, also on the inside, private network, via the outside, public IP address in DNS: Your browsing host attempts to establish a TCP connection on IP A.B.C.D, port X. It consults its local routing table, which does not have ...


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Most Cocoa apps (most OS X GUI apps) use networking APIs that use the mDNSResponder process to handle their DNS queries. Look at the mDNSResponder(8) man page for how to get debug information out of it. It involves sending it the INFO, USR1, and USR2 signals, and watching various log streams. That debug information may tell you which processes are making ...


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Well, documentation seems a bit inconsistent. According to this (via "nslookup specify server port"): In the nslookup console you can just type: set port=545 To set the server port. In theory that means on the command line you can do: nslookup -port=545 something.com 127.0.0.1 However I tried this on Windows 7 and it had no effect. Interestingly, the ...


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It's just a hostname, picked by the server owners; similar to "WWW". Focusing on ones named like "WW##", with no further information, those are probably nodes in a web farm/cluster. Re: "Why when I visit some page using these, receive a message "This IP has been banned"." Without much more information regarding exaly how/when you're seeing this (and ...


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All No-IP DNS will do will associate your internet facing IP with a DNS record. You really would need to talk to your network administrator about setting up a port forwarding rule for you.


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MS IE likes to follow all security rules where firefox and chrome does not. This could be due only on https sites, but Try below steps from IE 11. Tools > Internet Options > Advanced > Look for Security Uncheck below. "Check for Publisher's Certificate revocation" "Check for server certificate revocatoin" Also Go to Tools > Compatibility View Settings ...


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It is possible, and pretty easy, using one of the popular dynamic dns providers, like noip.com or dyndns.com. You install dynamic dns client software on the computer, which is available for all major operating systems including linux. This software hits your ddns provider's update page on a regular basis, and if your ip has changed, the provider detects ...


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You're lacking basic skills on networks. To connect to something with it's name you need a DNS Server and registered IP addresses in this DNS Server. What you're seeing is nothing more than a mess of protocols broadcasting in your network with different names and domain names. In common sense, perhaps you're missing the local domain. Yep. Try to connect to ...


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Based on our discussion in the comments, yes, this is possible, but no, it will not behave as you want/need it to. If you were to set up a local DNS server (or set one up on a VPS), it would essentially act as a proxy server for your DNS requests. There is not "DNS database" to download, so it would perform DNS lookups in response to client requests, cache ...



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