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40

It is often not equivalent. Streaming providers use protocols, such as DASH, to dynamically adjust the quality of the movie to the users bandwidth availability and quality desires. Then the servers may rate-limit your connection so that you can buffer a certain amount (something like 10 seconds, maybe 30 or a whole minute) and afterwards you only get the ...


18

Assuming we are talking about the same quality (i.e. no throttling, frame-skipping, or lower-quality streams), then at best the streams will take the same amount of bandwidth as a download, although it could be done at a time/rate more convenient to the provider. It could also take more bandwidth depending on how the video is compressed - most of the time ...


6

Streaming will use less bandwidth, especially if network conditions are bad, but this comes at a price. At issue is the data that needs to be sent. In a download model, all of the data must reach the customer, all in the right order, no matter what. If network conditions are bad and some bits of the data don't reach the client, they must be resent, and this ...


5

If you're really asking for "bandwidth" (bytes/sec) and not "total data" (bytes), the crucial question is: during what period of time? If we're assuming that the user watches the entire video and that the same codec/quality etc. is returned, and ignore the small overhead of streaming request/responses, then the total data returned is equal. Now, what is the ...


4

They are not comparable. For the first instance, the optimal encoding for local viewing is different than the optima encoding for streamed viewing. Let's talk about video encoding. In most video encoding format, there are usually two types of frames: Intra-coded frame (I-Frame) - these are frames that is transferred in full, this frame can be decoded ...


3

Many transfer mechanisms have no idea what the size of the file they are downloading is. Check out this related SU question: Why do some downloading files not know their own size? Also, the transfer mechanisms have no idea what data is supposed to be in the file; so it has no idea if that 1 it just read in the download was actually a 1 at the source or if ...


2

Personally I would stick to a download manager like DownThemAll for FireFox. I've used it in the past for a number of things, but in particular, downloading large 1gb+ files and have NEVER experienced any problems. Plus I find it actually downloads files quicker and you have the option to pause the downloads (without having to worry that the file might ...


2

It depends heavily on the length, quality and file format of the video. You can see the total amount of data used on any given video by right-clicking on the video to bring up this menu: Then, you can click Stats for nerds and bring up this prompt: The Bandwidth option is what you're looking for. It shows a graph, along with real-time data of the ...


1

The best answer i can think of and it will require some input from you in order to work with the data is nethogs! Install nethogs (should be in repo) And it will work like this : nethogs nethogs eth1 nethogs [option] eth0 eth1 nethogs [option] eth0 eth1 ppp0 sudo /usr/sbin/nethogs eth0 You will end up with something like this : With this you will ...


1

There is an experimental tool available, this converts the download to a torrent. http://burnbit.com/ Warning: never used it personally. Registration may be required.


1

From network point-of-view "downloading" and "streaming" are different services, it is called "traffic profile" For streaming service the network has to provide a minimum constant throughput (technically "bandwidth" means something different), the streaming service is sensitive for interruptions and jitter. It does not require the maximum network ...


1

The answer is "It depends". The answer is NO, for providers that host video in general. Half decent providers that stream video do rate control so as to ensure smooth playback and optimal bandwidth for as many people as possible. So even though you may have lots of bandwidth, it may decide to give you only 5Mbit and look still quite decent. If you do an ...


1

The location of dmg file downloaded by Xcode is placed here. ~/Library/Caches/com.apple.dt.Xcode/Downloads


1

On the first page there's probably a link to logout as well, which does exactly what it suppose to. To avoid this use -R (eg. -R "*logout*") as stated here


1

some remarks: a) the webserver tells you (if it is a nice webserver) via a http-header-entry about the content-length that is about to come down the line. see: http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec14.html#sec14.13 this might be the truth or it might be not. b) if the webserver does not stop sending data after reaching the content-length than the ...


1

The total downloaded includes discarded data. If it downloads a 2MB chunk and it fails validation, it still counts against the total data, but was not applied to the video file's downloaded amount. The speed difference is usually protocol overhead. Only actual file data transfer is attributed to the video file, while the total includes that plus all the ...



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