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13

A very helpful AT&T tech that came out to my house ended up solving this issue for me. The tech measured the signal quality at the point of the phone/DSL wire coming into the outside of my home. The signal quality was just fine at that point (to my surprise)! The tech measured the signal quality at the phone jack inside my home where I had my router ...


5

It's because your ISP has (badly) oversubscribed the line in your area. In the evenings everybody is else using their computer too so the available bandwidth drops. This is a very common practise that ISP's like to keep on the quiet so of course the tech support isn't going to mention it.


5

PPPoE clients use PPPoE Active Discovery to discover PPPoE Access Concentrators (servers) on the network. The first packet the client transmits is a PPPoE Active Discovery Initiation (PADI) which is sent to the Ethernet broadcast address (all ones in binary, all f's in hex: ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff). And PPPoE ACs on the network respond with PADO's (Offers). The ...


4

The above answers seem to relate to load balancing rather than link bonding. Below is a clip (note an appliance is needed at both ends of the connection - will your ISP allow you that?): : So I think the answers to your specific questions are: Yes, Yes, No (in order).


4

to put dsl broadband to the most basic level, the telephone cable comes out at the exchange and goes in to splitter equipment, half goes to the telco/phone side, other goes to the ISP. ATM is basically a physical transfer layer, it is level 1 on the OSI model, and used as the physical link. PtPP gets performed at the link layer, it needs a physical ...


4

Have you had AT&T run line tests? There are tests they can do remotely to tell line noise, etc.. Is your phone line going through any UPS's, filters, splitters, etc.? You may need to have your house's wiring checked. There could be a bad spot somewhere. You could take your DSL modem to the actual junction box (outside of your home) and connect ...


3

Some things to try: Software: WinRouter Restarter Imran's Broadband Helper Utility Telnet: (according the product page telnet remote management is supported) so try this in a command prompt: Telnet "the ip of your router" (generally 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1) You will be prompted for user name & password (if it's not set, generaly ...


3

The usual approach to this is to do the following. Make sure both routers are using the same subnet. Since you say your Thompson integrated router & DSL modem must use the local IP address 10.0.0.139 it appears you must set up the WRT54G to use the 10.0.0.0 network with the same subnet mask 255.255.255.0 used by the Thompson router. As you already ...


3

It sounds like what you want to do is put the modem into transparent bridging mode, which would cause it to just act like a modem and not have any other configuration. Just by googling I found some instructions on a forum for your model of modem, though I haven't tried it myself since I don't have one. I can describe to you the general process that you need ...


3

If you don't get recommended hardware, good luck getting ANY support if/when issues arise. I have unfortunately had to deal with a large number of ISP reps in a professional capacity (for my customers at the last job), and they are generally clueless. They have a very strict script they need to follow (reset modem, reset router, etc). Their logic is ...


2

Since I know that our company is not, or usually not, over subscribed, I tend to find other faults. On several occasions I have seen problems with customers using wireless routers with no security. I actually checked out this one customer at his prem and determined 5 nieghbours were getting free internet using his router. 2 of them were downloading big ...


2

It seems to be an 802.11n access point and Ethernet 4-port router. Overpriced (for running that firmware and being able to handle 3G stuff like cheap Huawei modems by it), using pretty common chipset. Has no 'DSL' at Features tab. It indeed has a WAN port, which will be shared over 802.11n and may be used for connecting to another DSL router, or any other ...


2

Your hunch is correct: you cannot connect the phone line (with or without) a DSL filter to the Ethernet port. The phone line is incompatible with Ethernet at several levels. The phone line uses only two wires; Ethernet uses four (for 10/100BaseT) or eight wires (for Gigabit). ADSL uses asymmetric (different) transmit and receive speeds; Ethernet is ...


2

Not sure it's possible with DSL... Can you create a firewall rule with only WAN parameters? In other words, go to Firewall > Rules > WAN and create the rule there. Be sure to restrict traffic to not include PPPoE, i.e., LAN > WAN.


2

There's probably a problem with the line between your house and the CO. Unfortunately if AT&T won't fix it there's not much you can do besides look into a cable modem. They own the line, and until the line fails, or there is an audible problem on the line when making voice calls (since you don't have voice service that'll be a tough sell). Other ...


2

My take on this is that you should always keep router and modem separate. I know others who have a combo modem installed, which includes the router, the wireless access point AND DSL modem. Although it will likely end up being more expensive, keeping components separate is a better long-term strategy. Usually, the DSL modem should stand by itself, providing ...


2

This model has no CFE recovery. So your only choice is a 30-30-30 reset. If that doesn't do it, the modem is bricked. That is, it is now as useful as a brick. To do a 30-30-30 reset: Unplug the modem, wait a few seconds, plug it back in. Wait for the lights to stabilize. Hold the reset button down for 30 seconds. Keeping the reset button down, unplug the ...


2

For the type of connection bonding you are talking about, your SSH session will use only 1 line. Depending on the dual-wan router, they will have different types of settings to utilize both links. Line 2 could be used only as a backup. Alternatively, some LAN clients could be assigned Line 1, while other Line 2. Or it could be as simple as round-robin - one ...


2

It's possible that your phone is to blame for the hangup on phone ring. DSL operates using sub-audible signals over your phone line. If your phone is old or poorly made, it may emit signals in the general range of the DSL modem. Putting DSL filters between your phone and the line may help prevent this interference. Regarding DSL modems, I've found the 2Wire ...


2

See page 78 of the user manual. You can view the connected wireless devices in Wireless - Station Info category on the http://192.168.1.1 page.


2

This is "normal" behaviour. Its actually a complicated thing to ask your router to do to ask it to take in an external IP address, translate and NAT it, then send it back into your internal network. It can be setup to do this but that takes some extra configuration generally speaking. There are some general solutions to this problem: Use a HOSTS file, ...


2

Yes. Simply disable NAT and DHCP service. You want it to be just a bridge, with wireless AP mode on. Use one of the LAN Ethernet ports to connect it into your home LAN (e.g. into a LAN port of your upstream router).


2

The "webpages" in a router aren't stored on a drive on the router that you can edit. They are stored in firmware. You can attempt to modify that firmware, but it's not a scripting job like a website edit. It would be extremely difficult (for someone without prior experience doing it), and if a mistake was made, you would permanently brick the router. A ...


2

A router usually has internal flash to store its firmware and limited memory. Thus the webpages you see are almost guaranteed to be stored in the flash. To change them you need to: Get a copy of the current firmware. Unpack it so that you can edit it. Edit it Repack it as firmware. Flash the modem with the new firmware and hope you did not make any ...


1

log into your router through IE or chrome.. etc e.g. http://x.x.x.x Then follow these steps. 1. Go to wireless 2. Basic settings 3. there should be a configuration type manual/WPS Hope this helps.


1

First of all, you "WBR-3460B DSL modem" is not just a DSL modem. As you can see in the manual it is an composite device with: Either a POST (A) or ISDN (B) ADSL modem An integrated wireless G access point, and A build in router. There is no reason why you have to use the DSL part. You can use it as a WAP assuming the firmware supports it. Do do that ...


1

You need to use your router's web interface to see the list of connected devices. If you only connect wireless devices you can view associated wireless stations in Station Info section of your router web interface: If you have a mixture of wired and wireless devices and you use DHCP at the same time (which is as a regular setup at home), then you can ...


1

I assume you have configured your PC to use your router as the principal DNS server, and for the looks of that page, I think your router would only respond to DNS queries corresponding to subdomains of "westel.com". Try to reach www.joelchristophel.com.westel.com to check if that redirects you to Bing If that works, change the domain name to ...


1

If you have a old computer lying around you could install pfsense on that computer and apply limits for each system.



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