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42

VGA is the only analog signal from the above mentioned ones so it's already an explanation for difference. Using the adapter can further worsen your situation. some further reading: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/hdmi-vs-dvi-vs-displayport-vs-vga/


12

Assuming brightness,contract and sharpness are the same in both cases, there could be 2 other reasons why text is sharper with DVI/HDMI: The first has already been stated, VGA is analog so will need to go through an analog to digital conversion inside the monitor, this will theoretically degrade image quality. Secondly, assuming you are using Windows there ...


7

The others make some good points, but the main reason is an obvious clock and phase mismatch. The VGA is analog and is subject to interference and mismatch of the analog sending and receiving sides. Normally one would use a pattern like this: http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/clock_phase.php And adjust the clock and phase of the monitor to get the best match ...


4

There are a few answers indicating a digital signal vs. analog which is correct. But that does not answer the why? A few mentioned translation layers, this is sorta true too, a mainstream A/D conversion can cause a loss in fidelity, but you'd have to measure this as it is hard to see the differences with the naked eye. A cheap conversion and all bets are ...


3

Your hardware is pretty old (c. 2008), and it somewhat predates commodity dual monitor support. Q43/Q45 has an Intel GMA X4500 adapter if it's using on-board graphics. You neglected to list the make and model of the computer or motherboard, but as far as I can tell that adapter does support dual monitors in some configurations. It depends on the precise ...


3

Another issue is a lot of VGA cables are junk. If the VGA cable is less than 1/4" thick, you will probably notice ghosting on larger monitors (Higher the rez, more likely ghosting). I've even noticed ghosting on the attached VGA cable on some 19" CRT montitors. My VGA cables are about 1/3" thick and it really helps with the sharpness (Thicker wires, more ...


2

HDMI and DVI are very similar. Both are digital; the main differences are that HDMI supports audio and HDCP. When switching between HDMI and DVI, there is little actual conversion, but rather connecting the matching pins on the connectors. Display Port is a digital protocol, but VGA is analog, and the converter likely introduces small flaws and the reduction ...


1

HDMI and DVI are actually one and the same (at least in your context). DVI connectors are really just HDMI connectors with a different pinout (the rows of pins), plus VGA connectors with a different pinout (the pins arranged around a cross shape). If you look at your HDMI-to-DVI converter, you'll probably notice that the cross-shaped part is missing. So you ...


1

That error message is from your monitors' firmware, not from your system. Apparently, when the DualHead2Go box is running at 3840x1080, it has picked a scan frequency that your monitors can't handle over VGA. You know that there are DVI to HDMI adapters? And cables, for that matter. DVI male on one end, HDMI male on the other, so if you don't already ...


1

DVI (and, for that matter, any digital signal) should offer you a somewhat clearer picture... Though to be honest the change in standards was made to address other issues unrelated to picture quality. Digital signals can drive higher resolution screens at faster screen refresh rates. The quality difference between a VGA signal and a DVI-D signal pushing a ...


1

Please check the official intel guide to dual monitors: http://www.intel.com/support/graphics/sb/CS-031040.htm if you meet the requirements, depending on your desired setup, choose either the clone configuration or extended setup configuration. Also note that in some situations, only it's supported DVI-D only, not DVI-I.



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