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23

Found the solution: For future reference if you want to change your keyboard layout on the welcome screen and other accounts on your computer you have to copy the settings to them. You can do that by navigating to: Control Panel -> Regional and Language Settings -> Administerative -> Copy Settings -> Click the check marks (at the bottom) to the welcome ...


16

It seems that someone having the same problem worked around it using a Windows compiled Autohotkey script. It's a portable application you can bring with you on a thumbdrive, and you should be able to just plug it in and start it up whenever you log on, even with restricted access. However, there isn't a layout for programmer dvorak, so you would have to ...


13

I found this more straightforward and simple: sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration


13

If you're willing to jailbreak it, you can run Cydia and install a Dvorak add-on for iKeyEx. (Source: http://kasperowski.com/2009/03/iphone-dvorak-for-real.html.)


12

From the Control Panel select Language and then Options: In the Input method select Add an input method: From there you can select the DVORAK R or L keyboards


10

There's really no point to Dvorak on an iPhone. The supposed efficiency of the Dvorak layout assumes that you're able to use all 10 fingers. A smaller screen like that would need a completely different layout. A layout optimized for the iPhone would need to take different things into account, because you're using thumbs rather than all your fingers. ...


10

Windows comes with Dvorak and Dvorak left/right keymaps for several languages. You can enable it (in Vista) by going to Control Panel -> Regional and Language Options -> Keyboards and Languages -> Change keyboards ... -> Add ... -> find your language and show more to see if it's got a Dvorak option. You can then switch between them using the Language Bar ...


7

There's an online Dvorak typing tutor. It basically just follows you through repeating patterns of letters and gradually introduces more letters and builds up words from the letters you've learnt so far. (Just click on "Lessons" in the menu along the top, and select which lesson you want to start with)


7

Save as .reg file and run (as admin on Win7, I guess... or just use regedit to make the change manually): Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Keyboard Layouts\E00E0804] "Layout File"="kbddv.dll" This changes the keyboard layout that ‘MS Pinyin IME 3.0’ for Chinese (Simplified) delegates to to ...


6

I was a Dvorak + Vim user for many years and ... remapping the keys just isn't worth it. I had them remapped for some time. The issue I ran into was that I became dependent on the remappings. As anyone who's ever tried to switch layouts knows, typing is muscle memory. Effectively my brain was trying to wire three kinds of cursor movement modes: 1) Dvorak ...


6

This is called "Dvorak - QWERTY command" on Mac, and it is useful. I have found this a autohotkey script for windows which claims to do what you want, but I haven't tested it. This also seems to be a dupe of a stackoverflow question, which suggests you can use the Microsoft Keyboard Layout Creator to do it as well.


6

This will guide you through the process of selecting different keyboard layouts: $ dpkg-reconfigure console-data Maybe you will need to install console-data. $ sudo apt-get install console-data If you want to make changes permanent then you can use: $ dpkg-reconfigure console-setup


6

Yes there is! Launch Control Panel > Region and Language > Click the Keyboards and Languages tab, then the Change keyboards.... button. From here, click the Advanced Key Settings tab and you can set a shortcut for switching input keyboards.


6

1) Make sure console-data package is installed: # loadkeys dvorak Loading /usr/share/keymaps/i386/dvorak/dvorak.kmap.gz $ dpkg --search /usr/share/keymaps/i386/dvorak/dvorak.kmap.gz console-data: /usr/share/keymaps/i386/dvorak/dvorak.kmap.gz $ cat /etc/debian_version wheezy/sid 2) IMHO, yes dumpkeys > test.keymap && edit test.keymap ...


5

Looks like this will work, too: $ sudo loadkeys dvorak Hat tip to http://ma.tt/2004/01/dvorak-on-linux-console/


5

The game, Typing of the Dead. Wiki entry Coding horror review


4

Another good way to get proficient is to just make the switch and work with it in whatever you do daily. I learned Dvorak a while ago, tried to switch, but gave up and went back to Qwerty. Recently I made the switch for good. I was too lazy to put stickers on my keyboard or rearrange the keys, and as a (positive?) consequence I'm not at all helped by looking ...


4

Have you tried using the default keyboard command to change your input method between Qwerty and Dvorak? By default it's Command-Space.


4

Applescript to hit the default shortcut to switch keyboard layouts. (See the Keyboard Shortcuts tab of your Keyboard preference pane to ensure it's enabled and modify shortcut as necessary.) tell application "System Events" keystroke " " using {command down} end tell Add the run AppleScript to your automator, and then the Launch Application.


4

I found the solution to be to create the following aliases in my .bashrc file: alias asdf="sudo loadkeys dvorak" alias aoeu="sudo loadkeys us" Now, when I find myself with the wrong layout, I type the same four keys on the home row to switch layouts. The only issue I had with this was that it could be difficult to enter a password for the sudo command ...


3

In the login screen there is the assistive tools option. From there you can open the on-screen keyboard with which you can log in. The OSK also reflects the keymap currently selected so you can determine what is being used. Also if there are several keymaps used pressing Windows+space may switch between them.


3

Add both layouts in the keyboard list as shown below under "Installed Services". Then after applying settings, your left Ctrl + Shift will allow you to switch between the layouts. Or you could display the language toolbar in your taskbar to allow easy switching. (Right click taskbar > toolbars > Language...) Screenshot from here


3

Ah, for Gnome to recognize it I had to add it to: /usr/share/X11/xkb/rules/{base,evdev}.{xml,lst}


3

You should definitely be able to create it with Ukelele.


3

It is indeed possible to create your own layout with Ukelele. However, it has already been done, so why not simply download the .keylayout file ? Note : To install a new keyboard layout from a .keylayout file, simply drop the .keylayout file in your ~/Library/Keyboard Layouts/ directory (or in /Library/Keyboard Layouts/ for a system-wide install).


3

You must download an extension module from the Programmer Dvorak home page.


3

The accepted answer is excellent, but I'll add this last point: the iPhone's auto-correction algorithms depend on knowing the proximity of the "keys" to each other. For example, on a QWERTY keyboard, "Y" is next to "T", so when I type "YESY", the phone knows that I probably meant to type "TEST". It's important to recognize that not only does the phone have ...



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