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21

I have done this before and the process is pretty straightforward. I ran a webserver on a dial up account that needed to disconnect and cycle IPs every 12 hours to be in compliance with my ISP Terms Of Service at the time. I will assume in your case you do not need to worry about the logic to keep the thing dialed up, so I will skip right to the next ...


15

You can use Log me in Hamachi. I use it on a Linux server thats behind NAT with no way of forwarding ports. It's free as in beer. You setup a network on logmein.com then install the client on the server. This will create a ham0 network device with an IP that will never change. You need to connect your client machines to the same hamachi network and you ...


14

Assuming your system has 2 ethernet devices, eth0 and eth1 and eth0 is connected to your LAN, say IPs 192.168.1.X and your eth1 device is connected to your ISP (WAN) you're going to want to use the following ifconfig command to get your IP for the WAN side. NOTE: The 1st 2 ways assume that you're running them against a computer that has 2 ethernet devices ...


6

It sounds like you might be a litle bit confused as to the difference between DynDns and port-forwarding. DynDns provides hostname resolution for your public IP address, or the "global" IP address of your router. Whenever your ISP assigns you a new public IP, the DynDns client (typically on your router) updates the DynDns servers. Port-forwarding takes ...


6

My suggestion (and what I do) would be to continue using DynDNS, and create a subdomain for home.example.com and make a CNAME to myhouse.dyndns.com (or whatever your DynDNS domain name is). This gives you the flexibility of using your own domain name with the ease of updating of DynDNS. Personal example: (the .doesntexist.org address is my DynDNS address) 0 ...


5

Asking the ISP or network administrator or physically checking the settings is the easiest way because: If you are talking about the address provided by your ISP, then switching your router off for a while will eventually force the ISP to release your old IP. Unfortunately, you could be unlucky and your "new" IP may be exactly the same as your old one. This ...


5

Reverse SSH tunneling would do the trick - in short, you get the computer that is behind the nat to connect to the other system's ssh server. You'd have to work out some way to initiate that - possibly some quick and dirty scripting and crontab running the processe to initiate a tunnel every so often, or using an always on system as an intermediary. An ...


5

To expand on the answer by TheTXI Using a service like DynDNS you create a new account which will provide you with a unqiue Url, for example myhome.dyndns.org. Depending on whether you have an ADSL Router or Modem the process differs slightly. When using an ADSL router you need to configure the Dynamic IP settings on the router to point to your new DynDNS ...


5

I think you can use no-ip.com or dyndns.com. This question may have your answer ddclient updating to local IP instead of public IP You don't specify if you need to access from the subnet or internet. So the solution is different (both explained in the superuser.com link)


4

I think you are looking for a dynamic DNS service. There are several ones, here is one example : No-IP You will have to create an account, then have a software running on your computer which will update your IP on their server. After, there will be an address like username.no-ip.org, username.myftp.org, etc. which will point to your computer. Other ...


3

For DynDns to work automatically, you need a router that supports dynamic DNS. I'm not familiar with the Airport, but in my D-Link router, there is a Dynamic DNS page where I put in my login information. The router then automatically updates my DNS settings every time my public IP address changes. If your router doesn't support that feature, you'll need ...


3

You can do this using DynDNS (will take care of the dynamic IP problem by always updating with the new IP when it is given) RealVNC (used for the remote desktop connection) You could also use other software products to achieve the same results, but this is typically the most popular combo.


2

Can someone please tell me how I can find a static IP address to give to her? Using the proposed things like DynDNS.com will give you a "static" host name, but not a static IP address. If that friend really needs to know an IP address for the filtering then you're out of luck.


2

This is possible, but I would not recommend it at all as it can leave your machine open to attack. I would personally look in to using something like either an FTP Server such as Filezilla or a HTTP Server such as IIS or Apache. This will allow you to share the root of your hard drive or any folder and have authentication - along with being a lot safer.


2

As others have stated, your router would have to be configured to forward the appropriate ports to the computer with the shares. You will be opening up a huge security hole, so consider other options. Almost anything will be better than SMB/CIFS over the open internet. Personally I'd use SCP/SFTP to take advantage of SSH security. You could even tunnel ...


2

There isn't any way you can have a static IP address on the public side of your network without some participation from your ISP. It isn't as easy as just setting a public address (which is fairly straightforward), but in order for it to work, you would need the rest of the internet to know it is there, and to route any packets for it via your ISP to your ...


2

There's a few options. Pagekite sounds the most simple and direct - it does everything you ask for and is publically accessible You might be able to go with some form of reverse ssh and tunnel everything through that. You'd need to establish the connection from the campus network to your home connection (where you'd need to set up port forwarding and such), ...


2

Both dyndns and, for example, freedns work, but your testing method is invalid. You should specify that you want AAAA entry in the DNS request: $ dig -t AAAA vi.dyndns.org | egrep -v '^$|^;' vi.dyndns.org. 172680 IN AAAA 2001:0:53aa:64c:c5b:4f1e:a9c6:61b1 $ dig -t AAAA vi0oss.twilightparadox.com | egrep -v '^$|^;' vi0oss.twilightparadox.com. ...


2

Assuming you're behind NAT, the most elegant way I can think of is to run a cron job on the router itself, periodically checking ifconfig too check its current WAN address. This may even be possible on a 'cheap brick' if you are able to install custom firmware. However elegant, hardly simple. As discussed here, on Windows, but the argument is equally valid ...


2

When you are behind a NAT Router with UPNP, you can use miniupnpc to detect wan ip address: # debian/ubuntu setup: # sudo apt-get install miniupnpc # get WAN IP address from UPNP router: upnpc -s | grep ^ExternalIPAddress | cut -c21- You could use it in a script e.g. for cron like: #!/bin/bash # # In this example, lynx is used as http client. you could ...


2

There is no real benefit to statics, except if you need to do NAT through your firewall to a static host, but no real problems either since your network is so small, it is easy to keep track of just a few static addresses (this was THE main pain in the butt for large organizations with static addressing in the distant past). I would keep a DHCP server so if ...


1

See DynDNS alternatives No-IP No-IP allows you to create up to 3 free Dynamics DNS hosts for private use. You will need to register for a free account, and either update your IP address via their web interface or download their Windows client. FreeDNS Free DNS, Dynamic DNS, Static DNS services; 5 free shared hostnames, use anywhere; ...


1

To summarize the long chain of comments. Important point to note is that when you say static ip, it could mean static ip from clients point of view or static ip from routers point of view. So from clients side, they would be static ip vs curiously static dynamic ip. If you are on a company lan, it is all the more likely it is the latter, though could be ...


1

There's no address shortage or allocation rule keeping them from assigning you a static /64 subnet or even as much as a /48. That's 65,536 /64's and each /64 is 2^64 addresses, considered enough for a whole Ethernet LAN. Hurricane Electric would be happy to give you a free /48 just for asking. SixXS is probably similar. So if you don't mind the possible ...


1

You first need to check which subnet you are in. Set your network card to DHCP and check the network and gateway addresses by doing ipconfig from cmd.exe. Once you have this information (I assume in this example your DHCP-assigned IP is 192.168.0.15, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 and gateway is 192.168.0.1) you can choose an unused IP within your network. ...


1

Sure it's possible. It's just redundant. And I can't be certain that a single Dynamic DNS provider would support it (you might have to use two, like noip.org and dyndns.org (I think they are organizationally different). What you end up with is two names pointing to the same IP. Since your router can only forward one port to one IP, it won't matter - if ...


1

Unfortunately there is no way to detect mechanisms like NAT that do not involve contacting a remote service. NAT is by nature completely transparent to the user, besides broken services, and there is no standard protocol for NAT discovery. But as far as external services are concerned, I have to suggest the fast and simple one I wrote, ident.me, which you ...


1

Going from work to home, this is solved most often (in my experience) by using a dynamic DNS daemon like DynDNS.org to associate a name with your home IP. I mention DynDNS.org only because I've used it before, not as a recommendation. The daemon routinely checks your external IP as viewed by the service, and maintains that IP with the dyndns.org servers, so ...


1

I find TeamViewer excellent for getting around the IP issue. From Wikipedia: TeamViewer is a proprietary computer software package for remote control, desktop sharing, online meetings, web conferencing and file transfer between computers. The software operates with the Microsoft Windows, OS X,1 Linux,[3] iOS,[4] and Android[5] operating systems. It is ...



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