Hot answers tagged

25

I have done this before and the process is pretty straightforward. I ran a webserver on a dial up account that needed to disconnect and cycle IPs every 12 hours to be in compliance with my ISP Terms Of Service at the time. I will assume in your case you do not need to worry about the logic to keep the thing dialed up, so I will skip right to the next ...


24

Assuming your system has 2 ethernet devices, eth0 and eth1 and eth0 is connected to your LAN, say IPs 192.168.1.X and your eth1 device is connected to your ISP (WAN) you're going to want to use the following ifconfig command to get your IP for the WAN side. NOTE: The 1st 2 ways assume that you're running them against a computer that has 2 ethernet devices ...


22

Famous one – I can haz IP: $ curl icanhazip.com 1.2.3.4 And that's it.


15

You can use Log me in Hamachi. I use it on a Linux server thats behind NAT with no way of forwarding ports. It's free as in beer. You setup a network on logmein.com then install the client on the server. This will create a ham0 network device with an IP that will never change. You need to connect your client machines to the same hamachi network and you ...


9

You might also be interested in DynDNS. Look at How to access my Home PC from the office?


8

If your system has curl installed (most do), you can use curl ifconfig.me


6

My suggestion (and what I do) would be to continue using DynDNS, and create a subdomain for home.example.com and make a CNAME to myhouse.dyndns.com (or whatever your DynDNS domain name is). This gives you the flexibility of using your own domain name with the ease of updating of DynDNS. Personal example: (the .doesntexist.org address is my DynDNS address) 0 ...


6

It sounds like you might be a litle bit confused as to the difference between DynDns and port-forwarding. DynDns provides hostname resolution for your public IP address, or the "global" IP address of your router. Whenever your ISP assigns you a new public IP, the DynDns client (typically on your router) updates the DynDns servers. Port-forwarding takes ...


6

To expand on the answer by TheTXI Using a service like DynDNS you create a new account which will provide you with a unqiue Url, for example myhome.dyndns.org. Depending on whether you have an ADSL Router or Modem the process differs slightly. When using an ADSL router you need to configure the Dynamic IP settings on the router to point to your new DynDNS ...


6

There's a few options. Pagekite sounds the most simple and direct - it does everything you ask for and is publically accessible You might be able to go with some form of reverse ssh and tunnel everything through that. You'd need to establish the connection from the campus network to your home connection (where you'd need to set up port forwarding and such), ...


5

Asking the ISP or network administrator or physically checking the settings is the easiest way because: If you are talking about the address provided by your ISP, then switching your router off for a while will eventually force the ISP to release your old IP. Unfortunately, you could be unlucky and your "new" IP may be exactly the same as your old one. This ...


5

Reverse SSH tunneling would do the trick - in short, you get the computer that is behind the nat to connect to the other system's ssh server. You'd have to work out some way to initiate that - possibly some quick and dirty scripting and crontab running the processe to initiate a tunnel every so often, or using an always on system as an intermediary. An ...


5

I think you can use no-ip.com or dyndns.com. This question may have your answer ddclient updating to local IP instead of public IP You don't specify if you need to access from the subnet or internet. So the solution is different (both explained in the superuser.com link)


5

This depends on your ISP's DHCP Server. Each time you are leased a new IP address - it will be leased for a set perios of time (with my ISP, this is 8 days). Half way through that period of time (4 days in my case), the router will re-apply for its IP and be leased it for a further 8 days - this is known as the DHCP Half-life. If your router is off long ...


4

I think you are looking for a dynamic DNS service. There are several ones, here is one example : No-IP You will have to create an account, then have a software running on your computer which will update your IP on their server. After, there will be an address like username.no-ip.org, username.myftp.org, etc. which will point to your computer. Other ...


4

I use http://checkip.amazonaws.com/ curl -s http://checkip.amazonaws.com/ (This form miscounts the above 82 characters as 15 characters, so I have to enter an extra sentence.)


4

There isn't any way you can have a static IP address on the public side of your network without some participation from your ISP. It isn't as easy as just setting a public address (which is fairly straightforward), but in order for it to work, you would need the rest of the internet to know it is there, and to route any packets for it via your ISP to your ...


4

When you are behind a NAT Router with UPNP, you can use miniupnpc to detect wan ip address: # debian/ubuntu setup: # sudo apt-get install miniupnpc # get WAN IP address from UPNP router: upnpc -s | grep ^ExternalIPAddress | cut -c21- You could use it in a script e.g. for cron like: #!/bin/bash # # In this example, lynx is used as http client. you could ...


4

Answering my own question as I have now found a solution. I am now using the service nsupdate.info, which supports what I want: Both IPv4 and IPv6 are reached using the same name, for which both A and AAAA records are provided. They had specific instructions for the Fritz!Box, which were shown when I was setting up my account. I repeat here what I have in ...


3

dyndns.com most routers support updating it with your dynamic router info and you can set up a hostname with them for free.


3

This is called Dynamic DNS, or DDNS. Some popular DDNS providers are DynDNS and No-IP. Many router firmwares like DD-WRT have DDNS support built in.


3

For DynDns to work automatically, you need a router that supports dynamic DNS. I'm not familiar with the Airport, but in my D-Link router, there is a Dynamic DNS page where I put in my login information. The router then automatically updates my DNS settings every time my public IP address changes. If your router doesn't support that feature, you'll need ...


3

You could try Hamachi: https://secure.logmein.com/products/hamachi2/ No port forwarding or dyndns needed!


3

You can do this using DynDNS (will take care of the dynamic IP problem by always updating with the new IP when it is given) RealVNC (used for the remote desktop connection) You could also use other software products to achieve the same results, but this is typically the most popular combo.


3

Are you looking for DynDNS? Check Getting my IP address?


3

Both dyndns and, for example, freedns work, but your testing method is invalid. You should specify that you want AAAA entry in the DNS request: $ dig -t AAAA vi.dyndns.org | egrep -v '^$|^;' vi.dyndns.org. 172680 IN AAAA 2001:0:53aa:64c:c5b:4f1e:a9c6:61b1 $ dig -t AAAA vi0oss.twilightparadox.com | egrep -v '^$|^;' vi0oss.twilightparadox.com. ...


3

Fetch info from your router via ssh or curl. I use curl to ask dyndns for my public ip but such a command seems not applicable for you right? curl http://checkip.dyndns.org 2> /dev/null| perl -pe 's,.*Address: (\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+).*,$1,'


3

I should have thought of this earlier, but it is now solved. The solution was to power cycle the router.


3

Assuming you're behind NAT, the most elegant way I can think of is to run a cron job on the router itself, periodically checking ifconfig too check its current WAN address. This may even be possible on a 'cheap brick' if you are able to install custom firmware. However elegant, hardly simple. As discussed here, on Windows, but the argument is equally valid ...



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