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5

Your local sys-admin can track your browsing history if they can get you to install a certificate on your (or their machine) - in which case they can man-in-the-middle your connection. If you have your own device and are sure they don't have a certificate, the best they can do is get a feel for what sites you are going to by looking at the IP address of the ...


3

You should not delete anything from the disk or modify it in any way, because such an action could void any chance of recovering the data. You should also not have reinstalled Lockmydrive, because that probably lost the information about the hidden files. You should rather have installed Lockmydrive on another computer and returned the deleted .exe. There ...


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This is not possible, because in order to print the file it must be extracted from the archive, and then any limintations regarding how the file can be used are reliant on the currently used OS's permissions for that file. You could always avoid giving the users the password for the archive, and instead give them a bat script that extracts it to a hidden ...


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Reference BitLocker Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) What happens if I try to open a BitLocker-protected, NTFS-formatted removable drive by using a computer running Windows XP or Windows Vista? In most cases, Windows XP and Windows Vista will not be able to recognize a BitLocker-protected, NTFS-formatted removable drive. In many situations, ...


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It helps if you look at your virtual machine just as you look at a physical machine. Access to your vdi file is (practically) equal to access to a physical harddisk. With that in mind: Access to a Bitlocked vdi file without Bitlocker password is not possible (unless the Bitlock encryption is broken). If you are running your virtual PC, no one can access ...


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So my does it imply that even my local sys-admin can't keep track of my browsing history too? No, not necessarily. A sysadmin can perform a man in the middle attack if they put a custom certificate on the client computer. If you click on the lock icon in the address bar of a secure site at home, it will say who the certificate issuer is and what the ...


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Impact of Bitlocker on performance of SSD See a similar superuser question here. Impact of Bitlocker on lifespan of SSD Microsoft's answer to the question: "Is Bitlocker’s encryption process optimized to work on SSDs?" Yes, on NTFS. When Bitlocker is first configured on a partition, the entire partition is read, encrypted and written back out. As ...


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The encrypt content uses NTFS' Encrypting File System feature on your files, which makes use of Public Key Cryptography. If you haven't taken a backup of your EFS certificates, there's no way to recover them


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If you search for some of those XML tags (like "GETEncryptedDataFile"), you'll find that they seem to be associated with Symantec Endpoint Encryption Removable Storage. There seems to be a trial version of this that you could play around with, but given that your file has a "Certificate" tag, that suggests to me that the encryption uses a certificate on your ...


2

I've got bad news for you - the files are lost, unless you've got a backup. Cryptolocker uses proper crypto combination (RSA-2048 and AES), and it's done right, so you've got very little chance of recovering anything.


1

That is probably not behavior you can easily achieve, but there may be a hack. When a file is opened for write, and data is written to it, eventually the write lock on the file is released. At this time, the file metadata like Modified Date are updated. When files are created, deleted, renamed, or changes are saved to them, an OS event is fired, detailing ...


1

In a word, yes - whenever you use symmetric encryption, it's only as strong as the passphrase you choose, so you need to choose one that is long and difficult to brute force. There's no definitive guideline on exactly how long it needs to be but 20-30 characters is what you should be aiming at if you're looking for maximum security.


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Yes, of course. You are right. Every system which is dependant only on a password as input will be strong as the password is. There are multiple possibilities how to make the encryption stronger: Certainly use a good quality password. The strength depends on multiple factors like: how much worth are your data, how much would a possible attacker invest into ...


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Arch Linux has some generally excellent help, see https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/System_Encryption_with_eCryptfs I'm not positive on how the system sees & decides to decrypt an encrypted home, thought it might be entries in /etc/fstab &/or /etc/crypttab telling the system where to find & to open the wrapped-passphrase file, decrypt it with ...


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So I eventually solved it like this: Open windows command prompt with administrator privileges Type diskpart and press enter list disk and then select disk 0 (or relevant number) to select the disk list volume and then select volume 2 (or relevant number) to select the volume Then simply extend and this extended the D drive to fill the available space to ...


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Yes. Secure your keys by using a passphrase. ssh-keygen -p -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa This will add a passphrase to an existing key created without one. You will have to enter the passphrase when you use the key, and this could (or should!) be a different password from your main user account, in case that gets compromised. Also: Encrypt your OS X volume Encrypt ...


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I have heard of this being supported by BitLocker in Windows 8 and later. I am not sure of your infrastructure, however I did find some information on TechNet that you might find useful if you want to go the BitLocker path. Below are the prerequisites and a link to the article. Network Unlock must meet mandatory hardware and software requirements before the ...


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The CD is an example of a read only device. It will prevent changes being made to it, but copying is still unrestricted. But what you describe is impossible. You want to give away digital information, but restrict how that information is used and limit it being transferred. The big media has been trying to do exactly that for decades (using DRM), and ...


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I've had problems like this for 2 times on both Internal and External Hard Drives. if you Really want to get your data back safe and sound like i did, here is what you should do: Stop writing to the Drive or using free recovery software, even if they recover some files, the file names will all be scrambled. Use Recover My Files program. it's free to search ...


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****8WAtp8nUEOrzSu67t9tGITEzIdgr6huIpXqofo0rv2w9y3DzSu67t9tGITEzIdgr6huIpXqoTzARKuumMLuyHlGrWvGXy8acawjyliExMCHCfRU9VzlAipW4HFMVN3XZixDAw4EcmBHnnJozJYoPgheWYx3P1S11TEADaLlKVO5bXyBhEPQu6Z4jdUAdnHUkRuKBuHoCcU0hMTIhTzyYriExMCEI84A= encrypt this****


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Unfortunately as you have formatted the original drive you will have destroyed your public key which Cryptolocker uses along with their private key to decrypt the files. So even if you did pay the ransom there would be no way of decrypting the files, or not until someone comes up with decrypter for that variant of Cryptolocker. Sorry there really is no ...


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I solved this problem by selecting my private key under my certificate (issued by Comodo) and in the get info window:access control tab deleting Mail.app from the "Always allow access..." list and adding it back immediately. When I saved the changes (to the keychain) and opened Mail, I was able to sign my messages again.



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