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PGP Encryption - How public and private keys work You share your public key only and this is what they encrypt data with before they send it to you. You can also encrypt data for them with their public key before you send it to them. The public key is just that [public] so anyone can safely have it to encrypt files but never the private as it always ...


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Imagine the HELL on EARTH that would be every time you have read/write access to your /home, you need to type your password in? A lot of programs rely on writing to that directory(browser, desktop applications, applications you compile and could be running from /home/<user>/bin...). If you really want something encrypted that you have to provide ...


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I wouldn't say it's correct. EFS isn't really something you need to enable or disable globally – it's the individual files that can be marked as "encrypted" or not. Newly created files are encrypted only if their parent folder is has encryption enabled. But if you disable the EFS service, your files won't magically decrypt themselves – they'll remain ...


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Try -K instead of -k. -k is used for passphrases and -K for keys in hexadecimals. You'd probably not require the -nosalt option anymore. You need to use -nopad and remove the bit padding yourself. Bit padding consists of a single bit set to 1 followed by multiple bits set to 0. If the plaintext consists of bytes - it usually does - then bit padding is ...


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Dumping the contents of memory will not help you here if the software is even vaguely smart about the proper use of public key cryptography. If you need to forcibly dump your memory though, there's a handy answer on this question: How do I create a memory dump of my computer freeze or crash? Public key cryptography makes use of asymmetric encryption, where ...


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What you want to do is use a program like Winzip or 7zip and create an archive with these files and password protect them. If you don't want to hand out the filenames either, place all files in a folder first and archive the entire folder with a password. Upon opening the archive, it will show the root (just one folder) and asks for the password. The user ...


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Encrypt and password protect everything you can than do as Joe Taylor said. Start with BitLocker to encrypt the HDD in case of theft. PDF can also be protected. Just follow these steps. You can disable printing as well. Of course this is not 100% secure but it would cause some headache for someone to steal the data. You can't do too much about the ...


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try: sudo cryptsetup /dev/mapper/loop9 $desired_name if that doesn't work then the volume is not LUKS compatible. the solution is to use cryptsetup to create a LUKS compatible volume in linux and mount it in windows with LibreCrypt. that way you can use it in both.


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I'm afraid you've lost your data. Bitlocker absolutely requires the recovery key to unlock the drive. It was not your password that was securing the drive; it was the recovery key the whole time. Your password was simply unlocking the recovery key which was then used to unlock the drive. You destroyed that key when you reformatted the OS drive. I hope ...


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There's lots of ways for things to go wrong in encryption, I read of one SED drive that just stored the password on the drive basically in plaintext (more below). Sleep & hibernate are troublesome for LUKS sometimes too. I'm not sure what or where to find a good manufacturer, almost all drives may be made by 2 companies anyway, probably in asia ...


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Maybe a VirtualBox bug... is there a way to list all the supported ciphers? Or maybe the order of options matters, some oracle blog and the VBox manual show this order: VBoxManage encryptmedium "uuid|filename" --newpassword "file|-" --cipher "cipher id" --newpasswordid "id" Or try using the GUI, should be here:


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To support Disk Encryption of the virtual machine, you've to install Oracle VM VirtualBox Extension Pack. Please install the Extension Pack from the VirtualBox download site. It's not included by default, because it can contain system level software that could be potentially harmful to your system. Please note that the version of Extension Pack needs to ...


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Consider the private key and actual key, and the public key a padlock. Whoever you hand over the padlock can close something (for example, a vault containing the secret message), and only you (keeping the private key safe) can open it again. And remember the padlock is digital: it is easy to replicate it an unlimited number of times. In fact, you often ...


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You're setting your current work directory as GnuPG home directory, which is pretty much never the thing you want to do. For day to day usage, do not set this option at all and have GnuPG use the default GnuPG home directory location (~/.gnupg). Leave out this option, and encryption will work fine. Additionally, --always-trust should never be used together ...



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