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2

Try uninstalling and re installing your networking drivers or rolling them back, connect to a AP then flush your dns, cmd; "ipconfig/flusdns" I believe then do a ipconfig/release and ipconfig/renew in cmd as well, reset the access point as well (AP).


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An 8 port router is just a router with a built-in switch, so there is no difference between the two solutions, speed-wise. A wireless router (which is the norm these days for a consumer device sold as a "router") is typically 3 devices built into the same box: a router a switch a wireless access point Benefits of an 8 port router is: Everything is in ...


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RJ45 plugs are universal (in size). A difference is from UTP to STP (shielded cable). RJ45 connectors and plugs for STP have grounding. However, crimper are the same for both types. So the answer is no, no specifics. Just get a crimper you like and use it for 5E,6,STP or anything.


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Could try putting it next to the heater so that it is less brittle when it goes into the criming tool? Else put something between on top to reduce the pressure (though this is possibly an oxymoron as it may actually increase the pressure required to crimp it properly)?


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The device used to "split" is called Ethernet switch. That device can split to any number but some consideration is needed: Your service provider may be happy to allow only limited number of end devices at the line. Each device you connect to main line will need a different ip address --- which is provided by your ISP. Your router will take one ip-address ...


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Yes it would, sort of, but for a few £/$/€ you could buy a second network card for your server/router and do it right. In either case, though, you will need to set the server/router as the default gateway for your other devices, and MASQUERADE (SNAT) all traffic heading out from your server/router to the rest of the world.


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If you're planning to cut the cables out of those punch blocks and manually crimp RJ45 ends on to them, then yes, you can follow the diagrams you have. This would end up resulting in more or less a long Ethernet cable with two normal ends that has been run through the wall. Punch-down blocks will often have different "pinouts" for the wires, so wires going ...


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Purchase a network switch (5 ports is probably plenty) and place it in the "man cave." Connect the CAT5 cable you currently have running out there to one port of the switch, then get a couple new CAT5 cables to connect your other devices to the switch.


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That text doesn't mention the onboard ethernet port (is there actually one on a MacBookPro ?) What it explains in a not so clear way is for external ethernet adapters: USB ethernet adapters work fine Thunderbolt connected ethernet adapters are internally treated as PCIe devices and current Linux (may change in future) doesn't support hot-plug for PCIe ...


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You need to get the PCI vendor and device string from Device Manager. Right click the unknown device->properties->details. Then use the dropdown to pick Hardware IDs. You will see something like PCI\VEN_10EC&DEV_8168&SUBSYS_E0001458&REV_06 In this instance, the Vendor ID is 10EC and the device ID is 8168. You can then use the site ...


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Sometimes there are just bad cables. If you like to insist trying to repair the cable, cut the heads off both ends and re-crimp new heads to both ends. Then try the cable again. Follow one of the color codes shown here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable Life has all kinds of quirks, and this is one of them that happens with persons ...



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