Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

The simplest method is to use a coupler known as a RJ45 Coupler. It is simply two RJ45 sockets connected straight through and allows you to plug in the ends of two Ethernet cables to effectively extend the length. They can be found for pennies on popular on-line auction and electronic/computer retail sites.


3

It seems as though the network administrators have a policy to not to allow student-owned WiFi access-points on their network. Perhaps they feel that such devices may allow unauthorized hosts to connect, and these hosts may use their network in ways contrary to the school's Acceptable Use Policy, in addition to inherently changing their network's topology. ...


2

Open the Device Manager. Locate your network adapter. Right-click -> Properties. Advanced Tab. What the options is called will vary based on the NIC manufacturer and may not even be available if the NIC's driver doesn't support it. On my system (Realtek adapter) it's labelled "TCP Checksum Offload" and there's one for IPv4 and one for IPv6. Other ...


2

Even data centers of major Internet companies hook up their servers via gigabit and multi-gigabit copper rather than fiber optic, because it's easier and cheaper. You have options for 1, 10, 40, and 100 Gbit copper for anything with an appropriate PCIe slot. Putting a fiber interface on a laptop is a hassle and will likely continue to be a hassle, but 1 ...


2

You have two options. The first is to, as you said, use your WIFI and plug into the NAS via ethernet. You can find such devices on Amazon similar to the link below: Amazon WIFI to Ethernet 'Adapter' - NETGEAR Universal N300 Wi-Fi to Ethernet Adapter The second option is you could run your ethernet through your electrical, something that I've found ...


2

Assuming you're talking about doing this from a PC, by looking at the ARP table you should be able to find the MAC address you're looking for. Of course, you also need to know the devices IP address so you're looking at the right one. The command you want to use in cmd is arp -a


2

As there is no routing device between the two, you need to assign an IP address for each of them, additionally being both in the same subnet. So, for example, you can assign the IP address (assuming these are not used, otherwise, you need to choose a different LAN segment): 192.168.100.1 and 255.255.255.0 to the Windows box. 192.168.100.2 and 255.255.255.0 ...


2

Plug your Macs into the a gigabit switch (the LAN ports on your router should be fine). Run IPerf 2.0.x between the two of them, and see what throughout you get. It should be 930+ Megabits/sec without even really trying. If you do get IPerf TCP throughput in that range, then you've shown that the problem is above the Ethernet level. The problem could be the ...


1

Rather than a literal "extend by WiFi" (as in a WiFi network accessible to other computers) this type of application is better served by "Point to point" radios that only connect to each other. Something like Ubiquiti Nanostation Locos (I use some, not otherwise associated), for an inexpensive example. When properly set, (WDS AP and WDS Station, for that ...


1

Presuming that you won't be breaking the 100-Meter maximum lenght specification, a simple gender-swapping coupler should allow you to connect the two cables as you describe. There are a couple potential gotcha's however. First, both cables would should use a compatible wiring scheme. Standard ethernet cable uses a Straight-Through layout, but there are ...


1

The WRG614 is over 8 years old now, and has an early implementation of the 'G' wireless protocol that has a maximum speed of 54mbits per second. It's never been a fast router, and most likely the wireless transmitter is weakening due to age. If the hardware version is v8 or WW then you can install dd-wrt third party firmware, which will allow you to adjust ...


1

Speaking as a guy with a campus 1Gb fiber plant (between building links) I run no in-building fiber links (none of my buildings are large enough to need more than 100m of cable, so copper gets the job done just as fast, and easier.) All my in-building links are 1Gb copper on Cat5e. To make your in-building network fast, I'd suggest (if facilities or what ...


1

It is, indeed a bad idea to go against your campus network team - and is probably going to land you in more hot water then its worth - particularly if you need to ask SU about how to get arround the restrictions. It is not a good idea to follow my thoughts below, however if you don't care about getting kicked out of college or breaking their user agreements ...


1

I can't find a datasheet that specifies, but given the evident era, the fact that it's 10/100 and Ubiquiti's design philosophy until recently, it's likely a 24V Passive PoE injector (PoE = Power over Ethernet.) But you could easily contact Ubiquiti support and ask. Or if you geek the right way you could measure voltage on (more like between) the blue and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible