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13

You're only allowed one link between switches to prevent bridging loops. If your switch is managed and supports LAGs, you can group multiple ports into one logical link.


6

The maximum possible bandwidth between two switches depends on the features (and possibly the configuration) of the switches. For switches that only speak Ethernet If either switch does not support LACP, there is no advantage in connecting more than one cable. If both switches do support LACP, you can get more bandwidth with more cables, up to some limit ...


3

The first answer on the question you listed is the right one. You need an Access Point.


2

You just need a wireless router that supports AP mode, lets you turn off its DHCP server, or can be set to a seperate DHCP range. There's also standalone access points - which might be the cheapest option. In my case I have a primary router (connected to a ONT for fibre optic internet) connected to a Asus router that has AP mode support. In the past I've ...


2

The Cheap way is to take any old Tower PC with at least 4 bays and 4 sata ports, put two ethernet ports in it and run (LInux) Samba for your file (NAS) services and iptables for your firewall. You will have full gigabit speeds to the inside interface of the box. You can run raid on your disks. You can even configure openvpn and/or run a webserver on the ...


1

You can't use TCP/IP to communicate between the two machines as things stand; you need a router in between. Your switch might be able to act as a router, depending on its exact make and model. If you can change network settings on B, give it a new IP address in the same subnet as A and you'll be OK.


1

A switch doesn't perform routing, unless it's a L3 switch. So either add a router to perform routing or do the following: Change the IP on machine A to an IP in the 172.17.1.0/24 subnet. You'll be able to access machine B. Change the IP settings on machine B and save it. At this moment you will lose connection, just change the IP settings on machine A ...


1

Because IP addresses are reachable from everywhere on the Internet, while Ethernet addresses are confined within the same network. IP uses routing – specific address prefixes, like 12.34.*.* or 56.7.89.*, are routed towards specific networks that "own" those addresses. These routes are distributed across the entire Internet using BGP. This works ...


1

Jim G may be right for some switches, except that many, especially linksys and Cisco, use spanning tree protocol to manage link redundancy and infinite loops, so it usually isn't a problem. As a network and systems admin you'll have to decide whether it's relevant for your situation. We have 5 servers, each handling a different subset of applications. We ...


1

Is there any actual advantage to having more than one Ethernet cable running to the switch from the server? Yes. Adding extra cables from one server to its switch may be useful in two ways : extra bandwidth : if the traffic to your server is heavy, there may be a bottleneck here. Note that servers have limited capacity : a file server cannot send ...


1

Connecting your cable modem directly to a PC is sometimes a necessary troubleshooting step - to ascertain whether problems are with your router or not, for example. Assuming this is a cable modem, and that it behaves like mine: Cable modems will only recognize a single device behind it - if you want to share the connection, a router does that and is ...


1

Yes you can. Just as root type for example: ifconfig eth0:1 192.168.10.110 ifconfig eth0:2 10.10.10.10 to make those chanages permanent just edit /etc/network/interfaces


1

Any reason why you have to have a "combined" NAS + router? Just buy a switch and NAS separately and attach all nodes to the switch. What are you trying to accomplish?



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