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62

Definition of a cross over cable: A cross over cable is typically used between devices with the same type of interface (ie computer to computer, router to router, etc). Ethernet cables are usually made as an A or B type interface (which matters simply how it is wired. A crossover simply has A on one end and B on the other. What is happening: ...


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Ethernet defines interfaces MDI and MDI-X. This terminology refers to variants of the Ethernet over twisted pair technology that use a female 8P8C port connection on a computer, or other network device. Ethernet over twisted pair uses 2 wires (one pair) to transmit and other 2 wires (other pair) to receive. MDI (ethernet card on a PC for example) uses ...


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Once you put crosses into a cable you build into the cable application-specific assumptions. This is undesirable in cases where the same cable can be used for multiple applications. By making the cables straight through the same cables could be used for ethernet, phone, ISDN etc without too much confusion (there was still the issue of which pairs of pins ...


3

Crossover cables redirect the output of one RJ-45 port into the input of the other RJ-45 port. If you connect the output of PC1 to the output of PC2 (With a straight cable), you won't get anywhere. Nowadays, NICs are smart enough to automatically reverse the IO pins, so you can achieve the same effect with a straight cable as you would with a crossover ...


2

Category-5E cables can run 1000BASE-T, but they cannot run 10GBASE-T. The cables must be installed to the standards: 1000BASE-T requires all four pairs, while 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX did not, so there are some non-standard patch cables and implementations which claim to be Category-5E, but do not follow the Category-5E standards, and this will only allow the ...


2

How are those 12 bytes of silence actually sent? The 12 byes of silence are called an interpacket gap (IPG), interframe spacing, or interframe gap (IFG) The standard minimum interpacket gap is 96 bit times (the time it takes to transmit 96 bits of raw data on the medium), which is 9.6 µs for 10 Mbit/s Ethernet, 0.96 µs for 100 Mbit/s (Fast) ...


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There are 2 forces at play here, the spring of the RJ-45 locking clip, and the spring of the expanding section of your laptops ethernet jack. Unfortunately, in a market trying to make thinner laptops, useless designs such as this are fairly common. My experience is that in addition to attempting to unspring the jack, you also need to provide a force to ...


1

On the assumption that this is an IP camera, this can definitely be done. You simply need to ensure that the camera network is on a different subnet to the network the USB Ethernet adaptor connects to - ie the IP address ranges are different. (This answer assumes the Camera network interface does not make use of a default gateway - this is a ...


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They are tied together - they both share power from the grid. Whether this will work depends on rather a large number of things, but particularly the sensitivity of the gear you choose and if they are on the same phase. If it works, its unlikely to work well, but the only way to see if it works at all is to try it. (Powerline networking is very similar ...


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As far as I know, It all depends on the installer and what tools you have available. With option 1, you're going to need a Punch Down tool, and with option 2 (which you already said you had) you need a crimping tool. For example when it comes to cat 6. I've talked to installers that simply can't stand crimping cat 6 with RJ45 connectors because it just ...


1

Option 1 is clearly technically superior. In-wall cabling should use solid core cables, while patch leads use stranded cables. (Solid cables provide a better signal, stranded cables are flexible). You generally should punch down solid core cables, and crimp stranded cables. That said, all else being equal, by using option 1, you are reducing the number ...


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Gigabit requires cat5e, and 10gbps requires cat6 ( and even the cards are extremely expensive, let alone switches ). The cables are backward compatible.


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Cat. 5 10/100/1000MbE* Category 5 cable is a currently outdated standard that provides support for up to 100Mhz operation. It can be used for 10/100 Ethernet without worry, however for longer runs of 1000MbE it is recomended to use Cat. 5e or higher. Cat. 5e 10/100/1000MbE Category 5e cable provides support for frequencies up to 100Mhz. Cat. 5e ...



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