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5

400Mbps = ~50MBps 1Gbps = ~120MBps Assuming you've a 1G network then at most you'll transfer around 110MBps real world, but there are a few potential limits. One being SMB/CIFS overhead and the other being the speed of the destination. The newer timecapsules have been benchmarked at 130MBps read and 100MBps write so should be able to saturate GigE but ...


4

You need a network switch, it's a cheap, small device that looks like this one: Just plug the cable that you already have into one port and connect the rest of devices to other ports using regular Ethernet cables. Switches are the most common and most reliable solution to this problem. Some time ago network hubs were used too, but switches generate less ...


3

Firstly, EoP uses mains voltage which is severely dangerous, do not attempt anything unless you're sure its safe. The current popular standard is AV2, that means you need to create an OFDM modem that can withstand 110/230V AC. Then you need a gigabit interface and a board to interface the two. Building such a device would require a high level of expertise ...


3

User Spiff is correct that it doesn't matter as far as the Wake-on-LAN functionality of the intended recipient goes. However, using UDP is recommended because it can be generated without raw sockets, and port 9 is recommended because it maps to the old well-known discard service wherease port 7 maps to the echo service. This means that if there are hosts on ...


2

I do tech support and the argument of TIA-568A vs TIA-568B vs 'whatever, but straight through" comes up every now and again. You should use the appropriate standard for your application. Since you're referring to Ethernet, you should use Cat5e or Cat6 cable and terminate with the TIA-568B pinout. TIA-568A This standard is acceptable/meant for voice ...


2

No; there is no speed between 100 and 1000 Mbps. You need to get gigabit compatible PoE gear, which allows both power and data to travel over all of the wires.


2

For PoE to work, both ends of the Ethernet link carrying power need to support the same flavor of PoE. I've never seen a USB Ethernet adapter that supports receiving (acting as the "powered device" (PD), not the power supply for) any flavor of PoE. I doubt a PoE-receiving USB Ethernet adapter exists, because PoE is thought of as a way to power whole remote ...


2

There are three ways you can handle flow control: If you're overloaded, you drop data on the floor. If you can't provide service for a request from a higher layer, typically because your local queue is full, you return an error to that higher layer. You proactively notify higher layers that they need to slow down. At the Ethernet layer, method 3 is ...


2

Ethernet flow control, so far, has been a failed experiment, because it often causes head-of-line blocking problems. Switches should not send pause frames to hosts. I believe Cisco switches cannot be configured to send pause frames; enabling Ethernet flow control on a Cisco switch just causes it to honor pause frames it receives. Hosts are wise to ignore ...


2

What you want here is some VLANs. Some APs may have the ability to apply access lists on the same flat network, but typically to have one AP's segment protected from another, VLANs are the way to go. Since your switch appears to be a managed switch, you should have some VLAN functionality. Now when you introduce VLANs, you're spitting your network up into ...


1

From my understanding of the documentation Cisco SPAN (and possibly others) makes a duplicate of both inward and outward streams on the mirrored port, but doesnt divert that level 2 traffic, so traffic from the Uni's distribution switches will still be switched by yours. The patch panel option is also simpler and reduces your possible points of failure. If ...


1

Not that this will be much use to you, but I can replicate the issue. As soon as I turn on jumbo frames for my DS413j my switch (d-link dgs-1100-24) RX errors skyrocket on the related port. This happens at ANY MTU over 1500. Looks to be fundamentally broken.


1

Ethernet over UTP (unshielded twisted pair) cable cannot be spliced nor passively split, and still conform to CAT(5/5e/6/*) specifications. The topology described requires a switch after the wall jack to provide multiple host connections.



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