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1

A switch doesn't perform routing, unless it's a L3 switch. So either add a router to perform routing or do the following: Change the IP on machine A to an IP in the 172.17.1.0/24 subnet. You'll be able to access machine B. Change the IP settings on machine B and save it. At this moment you will lose connection, just change the IP settings on machine A ...


0

You've made the assumption: each server will get a different MAC address. For example, Server 1 will connect to eth1, and Server 2 will connect to eth2, and Server 3 will connect to eth3. However that is not correct. As per the Linux kernel bonding documentation: different peers use different hardware addresses But not every peer will use a ...


0

Try the below steps and check your outcome. Hope this should help you. Right click on the Network adapter and try 'Disable' and 'Enable' Right click on the Network adapter and try Disconnect and Connect Go to Start > Computer > right click > Manage > on the right pane, select the Network adapter > right click and choose 'Uninstall'. Once the Uninstall ...


1

You can't use TCP/IP to communicate between the two machines as things stand; you need a router in between. Your switch might be able to act as a router, depending on its exact make and model. If you can change network settings on B, give it a new IP address in the same subnet as A and you'll be OK.


0

Yeah, network cards have speed limitation. As I know the Ethernets developed with supporting speeds of 10, 100 and 1000 Mbit/s. you can check the wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet


2

The Cheap way is to take any old Tower PC with at least 4 bays and 4 sata ports, put two ethernet ports in it and run (LInux) Samba for your file (NAS) services and iptables for your firewall. You will have full gigabit speeds to the inside interface of the box. You can run raid on your disks. You can even configure openvpn and/or run a webserver on the ...


1

Any reason why you have to have a "combined" NAS + router? Just buy a switch and NAS separately and attach all nodes to the switch. What are you trying to accomplish?


0

I had a similar problem with LXC, I worked around the bridging issue in wifi devices. First you need a spare ethernet device in the computer. The trick is to create a route from the ethernet device to the wifi. In the server file, change /etc/network/interfaces, pick an unused network for your virtual hosts, i.e. 10.0.0.0. Assign one IP to your spare ...


0

I feel that the dongle is just a modem ( with a DHCP server ) which distributes/assigns ipaddress .The ipaddress is maintained at NIC card ( after negotiation with dhcp server ). This is incorrect in three ways. First, the dongle is not just a modem. It's a network interface. Second, why would a modem need a DHCP server? Typically a modem would be ...


0

if you mean the cable that comes out the wall.. from your telephone company.. that goes to a modem. You wouldn't/couldn't use a basic switch to isolate two parts of a network.. but a more advanced switch that does VLANs might. I haven't used one but I am pretty sure it(a switch that can do VLANs) can isolate two parts of a network. (there is such a thing ...


0

Also you can use small server as router and make as many virtual interfaces as you need.


0

If your router supports multiple "Virtual Interfaces," you won't need to have two routers. If you use or install dd-wrt on your router, you can create a virtual interface for your guests and enable AP Isolation to keep that traffic separate from your "trusted" network.


1

Yes and No. It is possible to have one internet connection for multiple networks, however each router will need its own public IP address. You would need to check with your ISP to see if its possible to obtain multiple IPs.


0

Hi all I resolved the problem myself. If anyone needs help this is what you need to do. in etc/NetworkManager/system-connections you will find a file called Wired Connection 1 delete this file. Then reboot. In motherboard configuration re-enable the Lan adapter. reboot again


2

Assuming fibre & S/FTP etc are out of the question financially... Running 60m would really need cat 6, cat 5e would be pushing it by the time you added in patch cables at each end - but get it away from the AC power line, right away, if you ever want any signal to get through. 60m of 50/60Hz induction noise would be a signal-killer If you want ...


1

If this "one" ethernet port is your WAN or the one coming out of your modem, and it doesn't have a built in router, or your modem only provides one WAN address, then it would make more sense to get a router instead of a switch. A router can hand out dhcp address's to your two client computers and provide security. If this is your scenario, I think it would ...


0

I have two PCs which need to share one Ethernet port. What is the best solution? if both need to be on at the same time or if you do not want to continuously plug in and remove cables: Get a switch with at least 3 ports. One to connect to the current cable. Two to connect to your PCs. Note that 3 port switches are rare. Most models start with 4 ...


3

I would recommended purchasing a network switch (not a hub!). Here is a useful link explaining the differences between a Hub and a Switch


0

Use a hub. Hubs are designed for this explicitely (to "share" an ethernet port).


1

So, the windows update from yesterday (10/29/14 pst) seems to have solved the issue, it took a little while after logging in to be connected to working Internet again, but it eventually started working.


-1

Buy any of the listed Intel NIC or any NIC with corresponding chipset: Intel 82540EM Gigabit Ethernet Controller Intel 82540EP Gigabit Ethernet Controller Intel 82541EI Gigabit Ethernet Controller Intel 82541GI Gigabit Ethernet Controller Intel 82541PI Gigabit Ethernet Controller Intel 82543GC Gigabit Ethernet Controller Intel 82544 Gigabit Ethernet ...


0

The situation that you are currently running into could have several to many possible reasons. If your network settings show that you are connected to a network, then your hardware should be fine (so no need to install more drivers). I suspect incorrect network settings, either in you Windows Network Preferences, or in the browser (or in both). As an idiot ...


1

I gave 666 permissions to /dev/ttyUSB0 and then screen /dev/ttyUSB0. Worked on the fedora laptop, not the arch one and linux mint has been corrupted so badly that it no longer boots. Besides, I like the way that screen controls better. In a way, on the fedora box, minicom, cutecom, and putty all worked w/ sudo, but screen was the only one with an ...


1

One solution to this problem is simply running your terminal program as root: sudo minicom -D /dev/ttyUSB0 -b 9600 -8; however, there are also relatively simple methods to access serial lines as non-root by adding your local user to the dialout group... I solve this with sudo adduser mpenning dialout 99% of Cisco consoles are happy if you use: 9600 ...



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