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Quick Brainstorm (partially backed by previous epxerience): Microdish communication Site-Site VPN over Fibre Internet Cat6/Fibreunderground or overground (subject to permission) high powered WiFi Repeater I once worked for a college who got permission to use a streetlight for a wireless repeater between buildings that were a few hundred feet apart on the ...


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I can confirm that this will work. I've seen this implemented in enterprise environments with cubicles that weren't originally built out with dual data drops in each pod, but had the requirement introduced due to VOIP upgrades. Given how sensitive VOIP can be, and that no issues were present with this solution, I have no reservation in recommending it for ...


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I understand the interest of splitting an existing ethernet run to 2 user. But I believe you will have severe interference caused by the splitting. I bet it won't even work if both splits are connected to device, even if powered off. There are already suggestions about using a switch and also running an extension from room B to room C. But I would bring up ...


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You need a switch in your bedroom. Switches at Amazon A switch will allow you to use full network bandwidth when you are the only one using the bedroom Ethernet run. But you will still be sharing Internet bandwidth with all users connected to the network. If another person adds a device to that switch then the bandwidth will be shared. You will hardly ...


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The presence of the splitter and the stub of cable for the "middle" jack will screw up the electrical/noise characteristics of the line, causing signal integrity problems that may result in anywhere from degraded performance, occasional dropped frames, or just not working at all. 10/100/1000BASE-T Ethernet is not designed to be a bus with mid-span taps ...


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You should not use a splitter. I don't even think that would work. You should buy a 5 port switch or at the very least a 5 port hub.


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There are various ways to achieve this: If the router can be positioned close enough to the device, you can simply connect them together of course & then use the router to connect to the Park's WiFi by configuring it as a client (probably referred to as a Wi-Fi extender) instead of an access point. Alternatively, you could buy a device that is capable ...


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This is not a network ready scanner, so it would not be easily connected to Ethernet. A solution I have used non-network scanners is to connect the scanner to a PC that is on the network and have all scans saved to a network share. Then each person who scans something can go to the network shared folder to retrieve their scan. In your case, you can use ...


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Probably the nicest way to do this is to install the USB scanner onto one machine and then share the scanner over TCP/IP using something like the Network Twain Engine. (Free - Open Source)


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I cannot tell from your 4th paragraph if you are crossing over or not. Automatic crossover detection is part of the IEEE 802.3-2008 or IEEE 802.3ab 1000Base-T spec which uses all 4 pair. You don't have that so you do not get Automatic MDI/MDI-X. Make sure you terminate your orange and green for crossover as explained on wikipedia ...


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This is most likely a problem with the cabling at some point. Here are the most common problems I have found to cause this in my experience (without certified test results on the installation, which I presume you do not have): Improper termination of the cable to the jack/plug. Physical problem with the cabling, often the result of the cable being pulled ...


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Gigabit Ethernet is achievable on a cat. 5e network. Without any problems (I have seen it run on cat 5 as well). This behaviour is most probably caused by a breach in some of your pairs. That's why auto-negotiation falls back to 100BaseT


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Installed a new kernel and problem solved.


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Using Ethernet cable will unquestionably improve PC network speed for your desktop and laptops. Modern routers are actually switches, and send the signal to the PCs connected by cable to only that PC; traffic to and from all the other devices over WiFi are all broadcast over the same channel, so they will often collide. When the signals collide, each ...


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CAT6 has no value in this case. The only case where you might get SOME benefit is between two devices on your network. For example if you have a firewall box connected to a switch and then to the access point there might be some benefit to using CAT6 between them. But this is fanciful since all three of those functions are probably in the same box. But ...


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The Synchronous/Asynchronous notion does not incorporate analog circuitry engineering concepts. In 802.3-2008_section1.pdf , the PLS circuitry heavily involves analog electrical engineering derived from electro-magnetic physics. In a pure digital circuit design, the clock drives the signal and the work, as in a CPU design, where the first thing is adding a ...


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Technically, the 802.3 specification indicates that communication IS possible, since it is only concerned with MAC addresses (Layer 2). As long as you maintain the wire twist and re-sheathe the cable some how, you can wire the pairs to 1&3 and 2&6 on a standard RJ-45 (mindful of crosstalk), they will communicate. A hub only regenerates the signal, ...



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