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I MUST tell ; I tried ALL of the above without results and I couldn't accept to lose that connector right now (online exam tomorrow...). I had no lights on the connector, a working internet connection, and the latest drivers were correctly installed. I suggest to anyone do this little last move before you buy anything... Unplug PSU and CLEAN THE CONNECTOR! ...


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If you have done the same at both ends, then there is no problem (unless and until you ever replace one of the connectors, when you must remember to do that backwards). The arrangement of pairs is symmetrical, so 1+2 can be exchanged with 7+8, and 3+6 can be exchanged with 4+5. The wires comprising the cable are all electrically identical. Reference: ...


1

They are tied together - they both share power from the grid. Whether this will work depends on rather a large number of things, but particularly the sensitivity of the gear you choose and if they are on the same phase. If it works, its unlikely to work well, but the only way to see if it works at all is to try it. (Powerline networking is very similar ...


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This type of problem only has a few possible causes: network adapter compatibility issues (which are very uncommon nowadays) cabling issue which seems to be the most likely cause; make sure to try the same cable that you use to connect your router. software related issue such as a firewall rule; try disabling your firewall and any security software If ...


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On the assumption that this is an IP camera, this can definitely be done. You simply need to ensure that the camera network is on a different subnet to the network the USB Ethernet adaptor connects to - ie the IP address ranges are different. (This answer assumes the Camera network interface does not make use of a default gateway - this is a ...


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I've had this happen before and like a previous contributor mentioned, it happens when the spring action of the clip has lost flex and/or when it partially breaks. In my case I took a small set of needle nose pliers and while pushing the connector in (like you are trying to insert it), I grabbed the release with the pliers and pulled the clip down and out ...


2

There are 2 forces at play here, the spring of the RJ-45 locking clip, and the spring of the expanding section of your laptops ethernet jack. Unfortunately, in a market trying to make thinner laptops, useless designs such as this are fairly common. My experience is that in addition to attempting to unspring the jack, you also need to provide a force to ...


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If you suspect the switch, you would really need to swap it out to test, as switches can't be seen in the IP path. That said, its a lot more likely to be a problem with the sensor - maybe a DHCP lease renewal issue ? (If its something like that, can you hard code its IP address ?)


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I'm not really sure if you'd even want to use the fiber here. If I'm reading your question correctly, your application calls for full Gigabit Ethernet speeds over a long cable run. You might just need better (Cat 6 or Cat 6A) copper cabling. If gigabit is not enough, I'd look into 10 GbE switches (one at each end of the connection) and Cat 7 cables with ...


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Try it the same way. Basically there is no difference in connecting two PCs with Windows 7 or Windows 8 or Windows 10. One could even think of connecting a Windows 7 machine with a Windows 10 machine and again do it the same way... To get more into detail: If you have DHCP in your network (your computer automatically gets an IP address once it is powered ...


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At the NIC level, possible delays include: a PHY that's slow to equalize itself to the cable; a missing or disabled carrier-detect interrupt; driver layers that delay or debounce the carrier-detect status received from the interface. System concerns that can introduce significant delays include: loss and reestablishment of configuration and other state ...


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The connection is only going to work if you have a network connection. My guess is you only have one network wire plugged into one port. Keep in mind RHEL can detect your interfaces in a different order then the rescue CD. So eth0 under rhel might be eth1 under GENTO which can cause confusion. If you try to configure eth0 and get an error it could help ...


2

How are those 12 bytes of silence actually sent? The 12 byes of silence are called an interpacket gap (IPG), interframe spacing, or interframe gap (IFG) The standard minimum interpacket gap is 96 bit times (the time it takes to transmit 96 bits of raw data on the medium), which is 9.6 µs for 10 Mbit/s Ethernet, 0.96 µs for 100 Mbit/s (Fast) ...


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Linus from Linus Tech Tips on Youtube had the same problem, and I apologize but I have forgotten what the solution was. It is a recent (as of 4/20/2016) video, and I may be wrong but I think it ended up being a case where a single thread on a processor is the limiting factor, so if you have older hardware and you are trying to hit 1 Gbps, it is actually the ...


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Okay so after trying a few things I managed to get it working. The issue wasn't the cables or the computer itself it was simply the powerline adapters. For some reason they were out of sync and thus no data was being transferred between them. Thank you all for the help.


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Your DHCP service is not working correctly... "getting" a 169.254.x.x address means your computer is not receiving a DHCP offer that it can accept. After an attempt to get DHCP, if an offer is not received or cannot be accepted for some reason, the adapter/network driver automatically assigns the interface a bogus IP address of 169.254.x.x


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Here is what I suggest for troubleshooting: Is Ubuntu able to load the right driver? Make sure that the cable is connected if it is a wired connection. Verify the configuration of network interface Verify the configuration of DHCP (both client and server) From the ifconfig output, it seems that Ubuntu are able to install the correct driver and activate ...


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A fundamental concept is that digital data is easy to store compared to an analog signal. For instance the old analog telephone network requires a fully connected, active electrical path between two phones for the call to proceed. But digital data is typically grouped into frames or packets, and the data transfer can buffer (store) the data before ...


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It just receives the packet on one segment, figures out which segment (or segments) to send it on, and sends it exactly as it received it but at a different speed. So the outbound packet has the same source MAC address and destination MAC address as the inbound packet. The switch has to receive the entire packet before it can begin sending it on the other ...


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This isn't going to be an answer that you may like, but this is most likely what is happening. FYI for anyone not familiar with the term NIC, it means Network Interface Card, or in other words the network adapter. Answer: Your product does not have a Windows 10 Compatible Driver. I would suggest using any built-in NIC on your motherboard, and/or look at ...


1

Option 1 is clearly technically superior. In-wall cabling should use solid core cables, while patch leads use stranded cables. (Solid cables provide a better signal, stranded cables are flexible). You generally should punch down solid core cables, and crimp stranded cables. That said, all else being equal, by using option 1, you are reducing the number ...


1

As far as I know, It all depends on the installer and what tools you have available. With option 1, you're going to need a Punch Down tool, and with option 2 (which you already said you had) you need a crimping tool. For example when it comes to cat 6. I've talked to installers that simply can't stand crimping cat 6 with RJ45 connectors because it just ...


0

Do the two devices make seperate PPPoE connections? If so then I would guess that your ISP has set a speed limit on each PPPoE connection and didn't put in place any restrictions to stop a customer making multiple PPPoE connections at once or to limit the aggregate bandwidth of multiple connections from the same customer.


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It's possible that there might be interference from the Pi. I solved this problem by moving the Pi away from my WiFi router (using a 2 meter patch cable instead of the 0.5m I was using). Both the model A and model B+ caused the slowdown. Maybe the culprit in my case was the wireless kbd/mouse dongle.


6

Once you put crosses into a cable you build into the cable application-specific assumptions. This is undesirable in cases where the same cable can be used for multiple applications. By making the cables straight through the same cables could be used for ethernet, phone, ISDN etc without too much confusion (there was still the issue of which pairs of pins ...


11

Ethernet defines interfaces MDI and MDI-X. This terminology refers to variants of the Ethernet over twisted pair technology that use a female 8P8C port connection on a computer, or other network device. Ethernet over twisted pair uses 2 wires (one pair) to transmit and other 2 wires (other pair) to receive. MDI (ethernet card on a PC for example) uses ...


61

Definition of a cross over cable: A cross over cable is typically used between devices with the same type of interface (ie computer to computer, router to router, etc). Ethernet cables are usually made as an A or B type interface (which matters simply how it is wired. A crossover simply has A on one end and B on the other. What is happening: ...


3

Crossover cables redirect the output of one RJ-45 port into the input of the other RJ-45 port. If you connect the output of PC1 to the output of PC2 (With a straight cable), you won't get anywhere. Nowadays, NICs are smart enough to automatically reverse the IO pins, so you can achieve the same effect with a straight cable as you would with a crossover ...


1

Cat. 5 10/100/1000MbE* Category 5 cable is a currently outdated standard that provides support for up to 100Mhz operation. It can be used for 10/100 Ethernet without worry, however for longer runs of 1000MbE it is recomended to use Cat. 5e or higher. Cat. 5e 10/100/1000MbE Category 5e cable provides support for frequencies up to 100Mhz. Cat. 5e ...


1

Gigabit requires cat5e, and 10gbps requires cat6 ( and even the cards are extremely expensive, let alone switches ). The cables are backward compatible.


2

Category-5E cables can run 1000BASE-T, but they cannot run 10GBASE-T. The cables must be installed to the standards: 1000BASE-T requires all four pairs, while 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX did not, so there are some non-standard patch cables and implementations which claim to be Category-5E, but do not follow the Category-5E standards, and this will only allow the ...


0

Yes. The reinstall worked. I formatted my C: Drive (System Drive), then I installed the drivers in this order- Chipset Driver Display Driver WLAN/LAN (Ethernet Drivers) Others (Touchpad, audio etc. I don't really install these) My PC can now detect the Raspberry Pi over LAN...



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