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0

Similar thing happened to my friend, I tried everything including reinstalling the network driver, assigning IPv4 but nothing worked. Now this might sound lame but she just plugged in a different ethernet cable and, I don't know how, but it started working. So just give it a try.


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Is there a DHCP server at the other end of the Ethernet cable that will assign an IP address to the Ethernet interface? If there isn't a DHCP server at the other end, you can assign an IP address, subnet mask and gateway address with the following commands presuming that the gateway address, i.e., the router IP address, should be 192.168.1.1 and that an ...


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You have not assigned any IPv4 address to your eth0 adapter. @DragonLord I normally use the /etc/network/interfaces file. Adding an example below for two adapters, one with a static IP and one with a dynamic IP (DHCP). auto lo iface lo inet loopback allow-hotplug eth0 iface eth0 inet static address 10.0.0.99 netmask 255.255.255.0 ...


-1

I know nothing from a technical IT perspective. But I am sitting on an Apple iMac retina with a wifi connection. In the adjoining room, my sister has an ancient computer running Windows XP with a LAN cable, right next to the modem/router. We share one ADSL connection. Whenever she is on the computer, my internet speed drops to practically zero. I can't ...


2

First, know that the ceiling on the best PHY rate (Physical-layer rate: the basic signaling rate before protocol overhead) you can get is limited by how the capabilities of the client and AP overlap. Do they both support 802.11n or 802.11ac? Do they both support 40MHz- or 80MHz-wide channels? Do they both support 2 or 3 spatial streams? Do they both support ...


1

1) Game streaming Game streaming does not require a "very hefty" network. The ability to deliver 50Mbps more than enough, typically it uses 20-30Mbps, or a little more than a maximum quality Plex stream. However the half-duplex nature and low consistency of powerline could be a bigger issue. 2) The switch A switch will do fine in this situation. It will ...


-1

Here's a list of real-world speeds for various protocols. As you can see, you can typically only expect about 6MB/sec using wireless-N, though if you have a high-end AP and WiFi card with multiple antennas that can do 300Mbps or more, you may able to get somewhat higher transfer rates. Compare that with ubiquitous gigabit Ethernet getting you 120MB/sec and ...


4

I see two issues: 1) The wire colors appear to be incorrect. If you look closely at the bottom right pair of terminals in the 2nd picture, you see that you can use either green plus white OR orange plus white for that pair of terminals. You have both the green and orange wires going to that bottom right pair of terminals - that is wrong. Pull those wires ...


0

In fact you should probably connect anything you can to ethernet. Only when roaming does it make sense to fall back to wifi. Minimise the wifi traffic for devices for which there is no other option. This is better for throughput and for security.


2

It sounds like from that description that you need a switch which would be plugged into the patch port in your room and then plugged into both computers. An alternative would be to get WiFi but on the Thinkpad you could either get a USB WiFi adapter or create a bridged connection between the two computers. Hope this helped


0

The odds are that the thunderstorm wouldn't have damaged your ethernet adapter but not anything else, especially because its not a dedicated ethernet card. What is the motherboard that you have, and have you tried reinstalling any of the drivers for your specific motherboard?


1

It will need two things: Switches that support VLANs and VLAN trunking. The router must have more than one ethernet port. You have to create two VLANs and one Trunk on each switch : Room B: VLAN A - Ports that connect internal users VLAN B - Port to Wireless access point Trunk - Port to the only ethernet cable going to Room A Room A: VLAN A - Ports ...


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That is a resounding NO. USB and Ethernet can't be spliced in with a simple wire. You either need an adaptor (A Network Access Storage/NAS) or you need a router that supports USB devices, which frankly are a dime a dozen.


1

USB and Ethernet are very different beasts. Theoretically, you could use an Ethernet cable to transmit USB data, but it wouldn't be Ethernet communications and hub, routers, and network switches wouldn't recognize it (assuming they or the USB device aren't fried by it). There are purpose built solutions available though. In software: ...


1

No. The signaling for USB and Ethernet are completely different at both physical and logical levels. Under no circumstances should you attempt to connect a USB cable to an Ethernet port. Consider using a Linux device with gadget support to access mass storage being shared via NBD instead.


1

So after scouring the web for some time now, I've finally discovered the answer I was looking for. Although I'm not entirely sure if the matrix I have provides this capability, it is certainly plausible with the HDBaseT 2.0 standard. A quote from: Why HDBaseT 2.0 is So Awesome: USB and Multipoint Video Distribution More significant than USB support is ...


0

Link aggregation is what you're looking for, or often called NIC Teaming. If you're running a server OS like Windows server or Linux, these often have the ability built in. Most desktop OS' however do not have such a feature built in. Link aggregation would improve bandwidth, as you're theoretically going to get 2Gb to your switch instead of 1Gb. Plugging ...


1

Best fix other then crimping a new RJ45 connector is to use an RJCLIP. It's the newest way to easily get that network cable to securely plug back into a switch or wall jack without any fuss. Hear the Click! You can find it at www.rjclip.com or search it on eBay Don't just take my word, go do some research on RJCLIP


0

The IEEE 802.3 define standards who work in Phy Layer and Data Link Layer of OSI Model. The Current modes of Gigabit Ethernet are those: 1000BASE-CX 1000BASE-KX 1000BASE-SX 1000BASE-LX 1000BASE-LX 1000BASE-LX10 1000BASE-EX 1000BASE-ZX 1000BASE-BX10 1000BASE-T 1000BASE-TX A complete description between them can be found Here Usually links made a ...


0

Direct LAN connection requires use of "Twisted cable" or "crossover cable"- that is, transmit nodes of NIC of one device need to connect to receiving nodes of another device. So it's rather impossible in currently "traditional" cabling. But that's for full-duplex. Possibly it can be done via half-duplex, but not really sure... What you really want is going ...


0

No. The thing you are missing is duplex modes, and cable layouts. Cat-5/6 cables are 4-pair cables, meaning they have 8 individual lines within them (4+/4-). Duplex refers to how computers listen to individual cable pairs to send and recieve, and layout refers to which pair connects to which pin in the NIC on both sides. The ISO/IEEE/TIA have developed ...


0

The following options are available for connecting 3 devices. 1st Option: Use a switch / hub / router 2nd Option: Assuming that one of the devices you intend to connect is a desktop computer (with spare PCI slot) - install a dual Ethernet port type Network Interface Card plus drivers - now you connect to two different devices from two different ports ...


1

Theoretically you could, Hub Circuits can be replicated with only a Breadboard, but isn't a best practice (...) we always watch the Star Topology or in advanced networks Fully Connected Topology but to have all in rule you always should use the right Networking Hardware or your selected Network Topology will have a critical impact. If you are doing this ...


0

No. That just doesn't make any sense at all. To make a sensible connection, you have to connect transmit lines to receive lines. There's no sensible three-way connection.


2

Your "home router" doesn't really serve the same purpose as say a core router. Pre wifi when broadband started to proliferate in the US you used to have to pay extra for multiple ip addresses, so more per month for multiple computers in the same house. So the first NAT routers were born they took the traffic from multiple computers on your internal private ...



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