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11

Complexity, complexity, complexity. A modern browser supports Retrieving data over multiple protocols (http, https, ftp, ...) Rendering multiple different markup languages (plain html (in several versions), xhtml, html with css ...) Storing data and retrieving data at the request of remote users (cookies) Two (or more!) Turing complete programing ...


8

One vector that people haven't mentioned: plugins. The browser may be secure, but the plugin might have wide holes in it...and with ubiquitous plugins like Flash...exploits ahoy matey.


6

HackThisSite is a great place to practice the basics of web hacking.


4

The site doesn't go into details on exactly what exploits were used, so it's impossible to tell if they would have been thwarted by NoScripts. NoScripts blocks execution of all JavaScript and 3rd party scripting (like flash/sliverlight), so pretty much leaves you with just basic HTML. While it's certainly possible that a rendering bug in a browser could ...


3

Looking at the page source (using a text-mode downloader), it seems it is mostly Javascript. The best way to avoid these kinds of annoyances is to use NoScript. It also seems to have a Flash object somewhere in the page. Flashblock can help with that. There is also some code which moves windows all over the screen. Firefox has a preference which allows ...


3

I cURL'ed the page and put it up (raw text, no worries) on pastebin.ca. I also deleted ~400 blank lines that started off the page. It looks to be pure javascript, switching between several arrays to make the title move and the text change. NoScript soundly defeats this. It won't however defeat stuff like http://tinyurl.com/y8qdwsv without some ahead ...


3

Many answers here, all touching on different reasons, but the fundamental answer is "because that's where the money's at." Lots of other software probably has similar or more numbers of bugs, but they're not usually exploitable since you need to convince a user to expose them to the wild internet.


3

Partially it is the fact that some updates are rolled out faster then they should be. But one prevailing fact is a blog post Jeff posted awhile back here when ran as admin anything can happen. Also since each computer is different running different things it isn't always the browser itself that has an exploit. Sometimes it is a third party plugin like Flash. ...


3

Part of the problem is that the performance of browsers (like word processors and CAD programs) is highly dependent on the data, and as there can be (pretty much) an infinite variety of data there's no way that the developers can test every single combination to see if it gives undesirable results. Another aspect is that to get the interactivity that users ...


3

It is hard to speculate, but let me try. You are asking: In this situation can a remote attacker somehow detect the fact that the machine is connected to the internet and try connecting to do an exploit? Even if the unpatched machine is clean (how do you know? did you do clean install?) it could be compromised again. It would be hard to detect the ...


3

Primarily flash vulnerabilities are exposed when the player executes a malicious file. Assuming that the flash files played from the local machine are from a "trusted" source and that the flash player is never run outside of that context (ie within a browser), then there doesn't sound like much of a risk. That said, if the machine pulls information from ...


2

The second "clean" machine cannot be directly attacked and infected from the internet if it is behind a router but if your first machine has a known malware infection then it is possible that the malware on it could be written to actively seek out other machines on your network and infect them by any means possible. If there is one machine on your network ...


2

Today's malware often is a delivery mechanism for a multi-pronged attack that looks for program/os vulnerabilities, service vulnerabilities, share points, etc. From the initial machine infection, it can try to push infection agents to either actively or passively attack other machines on the network through various vulnerabilities. In your scenario, it is ...


2

Aliases only live on the shell that defined them, and system starts a new shell. That shell won't read ~/.bashrc or other files where aliases are typically defined, either: only interactive shells do. Some shells, but not all, read another file, but there's a shell-independent way of exploiting this. Shell command lookup tries the following elements in this ...


2

Normally you would answer that the more accessible a program is, the more risk it brings, and given that you use a download folder as a path would make it even more so. Even so, I would say that it won't really make a difference. The reason is that when you download a program to your downloads folder, you have downloaded it in the first place. Secondly, the ...


2

I caught some hits in the logs with: grep -r '"()' /var/log/httpd/ grep -r "'()" /var/log/httpd/


2

A simple web search for "Web Attack: Exploit Toolkit Website 32" returns this page from Symantec (the ones who make your Norton product): "Web Attack: Exploit Toolkit Website 32" Additional Information Malicious toolkits contain various exploits bundled into a single package. Victim, on visiting the malicious server hosting exploit toolkit, is ...


2

dmckee's answer is right on, but it can all be summed up with one thing: complex interaction with unexpected inputs. Your browser has to run code/markup, plugins, etc., deal with user input, plugins that run code, etc. It's impossible to test for all interactions, because you'd need the entire Internet -- present and future -- in your test suite. When you ...


2

Yep, it's javascript alright. Check out the NoScript extension, it's great for blocking annoying things like this.


2

http://www.hak5.org/ there are a lot of useful hacking tutorials on that site. very good!


2

Just a regular old JavaScript prank site, it looks like. (Pointed cURL at the address :P) As you're using Firefox, you can disable the window movement in Preferences ->Content ->Javascript ->Advanced, though there's no way to stop the messagebox spam built in, you could use NoScript to kill it before it has a chance to run.


2

I took a quick look at Security Advisories for Firefox 3.6. While I could have missed some, 6 of the 13 advisories on that page could be avoided by disabling JavaScript. Also, one of the remaining ones depends on downloadable fonts, which NoScript also blocks by default (it is the "Forbid @font-face" option in its configuration dialog). The other times I ...


1

I can recommend Semtex and I think it is a good match for what you want to do. From the abstract: This network is a legal environment where you can learn coding/hacking techniques without destroying anything. You have to solve Semtex 0 to get a username/password for login. Once logged in, you have to make your way from one level to the next, each ...


1

Fact is that every software has its weak points. None is bug free. And by fixing bugs, new ones are introduced. The other point is that the browser is one of the most used application and you can reach at a lot of people easily. That too makes it interesting for attackers to find the weak points.


1

In regards to Flash, there is the July 13 article Java and Flash both vulnerable—again—to new 0-day attacks Internet users should take renewed caution when using both Adobe Flash and Oracle's Java software framework; over the weekend, three previously unknown critical vulnerabilities that could be used to surreptitiously install malware on end-user ...


1

Whether a computer can be discovered behind a router has nothing to do with whether it is up to date and properly patched, but whether the router will allow it to be accessed. The network address translation and firewall provided by the router may provide a (small) degree of protection against the system, but it is still relatively easy to detect and ...


1

Yes. Java WebStart runs at Medium Integrity. In order to protect yourself from this exploit, you should immediately disable Java in all of your browsers and wait for a patch to be released. You should also make sure that any anti-virus software you have is fully up-to-date. This will reduce, but not eliminate the risk that you are successfully exploited ...


1

This is to answer a "mystery" from a previous comment ... BUT On Kgraves-PC I had SSH traffic coming straight from Duclaw at 10.0.10.120. How would I be seeing traffic from Duclaw on Kgraves-PC then? ... Tales of Three Tunnels Red kgraves-pc:3333 to devilsmilk:6666 kgraves-pc $ ssh -vg -L 3333:localhost:6666 misfitred@devilsmilk(10.0.10.121) Green ...


1

To do what you are asking, I can only think of the following way C = Client (Client software of rdp, telnet, etc) S = Server (Server software of rdp, telnet, etc) Red and Green are separate TCP/IP connection. Custome Proxy 1 (Blue) Listen to a local port to wait for client software connection (Red) Forward incoming packet from C to Custom Proxy 2 ...



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