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One way to tell is reading the chipset datasheet. According to Dell's specs, the Precision M4500 uses an Intel QM57 Express chipset. Intel's own specs for that chipset specify the following: Offers up to 2.5GT/s for fast access to peripheral devices and networking with up to 8 PCI Express* 2.0 x1 ports, configurable as x2 and x4 depending on motherboard ...


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It is possible to bring the PCI-E 1x pins present in an ExpressCard slot to a Mini PCI-E connector, or even a normal PCI-E 1x connector. Gaming enthusiasts have succesfully used full size PCI-E graphics cards to add external GPUs to laptops. However, all adapters I've seen either use a cable and a separate PCB assembly (ExpressCard to PCI-E), or they ...


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According to this account you can. Yes, you can boot Mac OS 10.6.4 via eSATA


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eSATA is much faster than USB 2.0. USB 2.0 will top out at about 30-35 MBps while your hard drive will transfer 60 MBps+. See this comparison. It is exactly the same speed as internal SATA, meaning that yes its speed will be comparable to the internal hard drive. Although I don't know that you will be able to boot of of either a PCMCIA or an ExpressCard ...


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For me, USB 3.0 devices have been fully compatible with USB 2.0 computer ports once the proper drivers are installed. The USB device usually comes with the drivers on it or you download them from the manufacturer's website. USB 3.0 cords are constructed so the computer end of the cable is compatible with the contacts in a USB 2.0 port, a USB 3.0 port just ...


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If your laptop has a mini PCI-E slot inside, supposedly they make mini PCI-E USB 3.0 adapters. Here is an example. However I have no idea how you'd attach additional ports to the chassis - there is no standard way to do this. A quick look at the motherboard here (ebay link, only one I could find) seems to suggest that the USB ports might be connected ...


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Bandwidth: "Good enough" is entirely subjective, and depends on what you wish to use it for. However, for a more objective view, we can compare the bandwidth. Wikipedia is as good a resource as any for this purpose. PCIe page: PCIe 2.x x16: 8 GB/s [External ports are also possible with an] ExpressCard interface, which provides single lane v1.1 ...


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There are no extra drivers need for windows 7 x64. It will automatically install drivers for it. You just check about the hardware installation first and then other stuff. First of all make sure that you connect the included cable to the USB Type-B port on the device, and the other end to a motherboard internal USB header. I have read some statements ...


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If you could make it your boot drive, I'd say clone your OS onto it and use the internal drive for everything else. :-) Otherwise, put a pagefile on it if Win 7 will let you, and VM disks would also go well there. I don't think ReadyBoost would provide a significant benefit on that system.


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Not all eSATA cards work. The OWC card (single SATA port) did, the dual port cards did not. Further, I was unable to boot from a powered docking station but was able to boot from a quad interface AC powered drive. I have not tried OWC's bus powered eSATA drives because they draw additional power through the Firewire 800 port. So the bottom line is yes, ...


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There aren't any ExpressCard USB adaptors that run at USB 3.0 speed, because the maximum data transfer rate of ExpressCard is 2.5 Gbit/sec, while USB 3.0 is 5 Gbit/sec. (ExpressCard 2.0 matches USB 3.0 for speed, but your MacBook Pro doesn't support ExpressCard 2.0 as far as I know.)


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Looks like the CalDigit is the best option - there is no deliberate proprietary lock down with their USB 3.0 cards for Mac/Windows. I emailed and then telephoned their support in the US, (from the UK!): They have tested it on other brands as well as their own. They sensibly say cannot guarantee every drive will be compatible, but nor are they saying ...


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FireWire has features than cannot be easily emulated over a bus like USB. A USB-to-FireWire adapter, if somebody would manage to build one, would probably not be able to get 1394b speeds, and would likely cost much more than a complete new notebook with a built-in FireWire (or Thunderbolt) controller.


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If you do not need to move around much you can combine an express card to PCI-e adapter and combine that with a common PCI express to PCMCIA adapter. The nice thing about this is that it is a very flexible solution, allowing you yo use common PCI-e cards (including PCI-e to PCMCIA, or even PCI-e graphics cards). The downside it that it is not very ...



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