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13

Copy the data somewhere else, format, copy back.


11

I figured this question would be solved by now, but I wanted to report my new findings as I was stuck with the same issue. As Jhon T pointed out, Ext2 IFS is one way to go if you can cope with the idea of running it always as an administrator and with Windows Vista compatibility. It doesn't run directly on Windows 7 because of the changes they did to ...


11

One really slow and "stupid" way to do this is to install a tiny linux distro in a virtual machine, let that work as a interface against the disk by sharing a folder with the host(OS X). It is completely overkill, but it will work.


9

Mount the drive with an option of umask=000. This tells the system to give every file newly created/copied on the system permissions of 777, unless told otherwise(such as via cp -p).


9

It appears you can use the kpartx tools: http://robert.penz.name/73/kpartx-a-tool-for-mounting-partitions-within-an-image-file/ Kpartx can be used to set up device mappings for the partitions of any partitioned block device. It is part of the Linux multipath-tools. With kpartx -l imagefile you get an overview of the partitions in the image file and with ...


8

Have you looked into dumpe2fs? You can use it as follows: dumpe2fs -b /dev/$partition E.g. dumpe2fs -b /dev/sdd1


8

Yes to FAT32, no to ext3. See here for tools that can do it.


8

Definitely ext3/4 over VFAT. Ext3/4 are journaling file systems, which means no fragmentation issues. Read/writes will be significantly faster with Ext. VFAT has a 4 GB maximum file-size, which can come back to haunt you when you need to store a large file on it after you already have it loaded up with data.


7

you can chmod 777 all of the files, to remove all of the restrictions.


7

No, the only way is to use a second hard drive/partition for backing up data and creating no partition.


7

Files can be hidden by a mount point. (A scheduled program (backup) must have run while while I had the secondary volume offline for maintenance, and gleefully recreated it's directory structure rather than failing.)


7

There are two factors that may be interacting. Unlike Windows you can delete files that are open. If you delete a movie that is being streamed, it will be removed from the directory, but will still exist as a file until the streaming program closes it. Once the streaming software closes it, the space will be released. The fuser -m command can be used ...


6

Asking "Will ext4 work with my harddisk" is similar to asking "Will this font work with my paper?". Any normal harddisk (or SSD) is essentially a very large blank sleet. Ext3 and ext4 are ways in which Linux divides that large blank sheet in smaller parts, for individual files. Like fonts, within reasonable bounds you can use any file system with any ...


6

You can do so by first mounting your partitions to /dev/loop? using losetup with the -o option to specify a suitable offset to your partition. The offset can be calculated based on the output of fdisk -l disk.img (start_sector * sector_size). For example: losetup -o32256 /dev/loop1 ./disk.img # mount first partition Once mounted, you can then proceed ...


5

Try to run in Vista compatibility mode as administrator. There is also Linux Reader and Explore2fs which will allow you to access ext3 volumes.


5

Newer Ubuntu distributions have the ntfs-3g driver already installed, so we can probably mount the drive: mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt if it's a SCSI or SATA type disk it will be sd*. sda for the first drive, sdb for the second, and so on. If it's an IDE drive it will be hd*. hda for the first, hdb for the second, and so on. now copy the folder ...


5

Just found this overview of three ways to access an ext3 partition. Don't know if the first supports Windows 7; the second supports Vista so it likely does. Both of those are just file managers, though. The third, Ext2 IFS, is the only one I've heard of before, and it does support ext3. It sounds like you wanted the partition mounted so all apps can ...


5

Funnily enough a kernel patch to do some sort of UID remapping on ext mounts "to make them actually useful on removable media" turned up very recently. Doesn't seem to be too controversial in the subsequent discussion so it should make it into your favourite distro at some point. BTW, I've used ext2/3 on removable media myself for years but it's almost ...


5

There is this discussion at InsanelyMac -- Mount ext3 partitions in OS X Another discussion at MacRumors -- Anybody understand how ext2fsx works? Get ext2fsx from Sourceforge Mount as ext2 mount -t ext2 /dev/disk0s3 /Volumes/linux1 Update: Check reference by Mikko in the other answer -- fuse-ext2


5

Use FUSE for OS X and the fuse-ext2 module to read and write ext2 and ext3 systems.


5

has_journal means it is ext3.


5

Ext2Fsd looks like what you are looking for. Ext2Fsd is a file system driver that allows accessing (both reading and writing) EXT2, EXT3 or EXT4 partitions from Windows. It works with Windows 2000, XP, Vista and Windows 7. Ext2Fsd has limited EXT4 support and by default it will load the filesystems in read-only mode, but you can force this if you ...


5

GParted cannot move or resize a partition if it's mounted and in use. It looks like you may be attempting to move the root partition for the currently running system you will need to use a GParted Live CD. See Acquiring GParted on Live CD. Once you've booted with the Live CD you should be able to move and resize this partition.


5

There's no way I know of to directly convert between these two filesystems. My suggestion would be to copy (preferably using something like rsync that can restart if it gets interrupted) from your NTFS partition to a new EXT3 partition. Alternatively if you don't have a spare disk big enough to do that you may be able to tar up the stuff on the NTFS drive ...


5

Immediate actions (Do and Don't): Do immediately umount /dev/sdaX partition or if it is not possible do mount -o remount,ro /dev/sdaX where /dev/sdaX is your partition device node. Do NOT write anything to partition that contains files/data that you're attempting to recover. Do NOT run any filesystem repair tools (fsck or like) or any utility that could ...


4

I am using Ext2FSD which is freeware. Works great for both reading and writing.


4

Here's a procedure you could try: Create a disk image a bit larger than what you need. Create the filesystem directly in the image. You may want to set filesystem parameters, as billc.cn suggests. Loop-mount the image and copy your files. Unmount. Shrink the image to its minimum size using resize2fs -M. If you prefer, use Gparted as a graphical front-end. ...


4

At the time I write this, you haven't ruled out the effects something in $LS_OPTIONS. GNU ls has a some file ignoring options, and ls -I foo -a still ignores foo. But the rest of my answer assumes you get the same results without $LS_OPTIONS. The total 4 line is not, in fact, surprising. This is the total number of blocks used by . and ... If . is empty and ...


4

This was no big deal at all, here's what I did: Edit /etc/fstab, replacing "ext3" with "ext4" for my root filesystem. (I also removed "barrier=1", which is now the default on ext4.) Reboot into single user mode with read only root filesystem. Run tune2fs -O extents,uninit_bg,dir_index /dev/DEV Reboot, again into single user mode with read only root ...



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