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46

Ext2Read works swell. It can also open & read disk images ( eg: Wubi disk images) Ext2Read is an explorer like utility to explore ext2/ext3/ext4 files. It now supports LVM2 and EXT4 extents. It can be used to view and copy files and folders. It can recursively copy entire folders. It can also be used to view and copy disk and file


23

First of all you need to create a partition, then you can make the filesystem. Create a new partition sudo fdisk /dev/sda This will bring up the fdisk menu, you should familiarize yourself with it, search for tutorials (here's one). The basic options are: Command action a toggle a bootable flagL b edit bsd disklabel c toggle the dos ...


21

The mount option user only allows the filesystem to be mounted by any user. The rw option makes the filesystem not readonly. You will have to use permissions to make the parent directory writeable. chmod 777 /media/foo The chmod command you show only affects the existing files within /media/foo.


13

You can't disable journaling on NTFS. That being said, the benefits are dubious these days. While writes are limited, the myths of write endurance existed from the first generation of SSDs that appeared in the enterprise market. I find it hard to believe that the same is still true ten years later. For example, Corsair's blog posted this test. ...


11

As written in the manpages mke2fs is used for creating new filesystems, not changing existing ones. I think the tool you are looking for is tune2fs, it can use the same parameter: tune2fs -O ^has_journal /dev/sdXY Whatever you do, make a backup before you play with filesystems. You might have to use the -f (force) parameter. Check the manpages with man ...


11

First thing is: Do not turn on your computer Start it with a LiveCD or LiveUSB Make a raw clone of the partition, using dd Never mount the partition, but if you need to, mount as read-only If your data is not encrypted, or is encrypted by blocks, there are tools that look for data in the disk independently of the filesystem. (e.g., photorec) Extundelete ...


10

You may have luck with: http://extundelete.sourceforge.net/ However, I've never used it. Warning: typically these days, filesystems don't support undelete. Trying to recover deleted files is an exercise in computer forensics and you're going to be very lucky to get them back. In particular, if you have written any more files to the disk, chances are your ...


10

I would consider using ext4 on brand new installations since the performance increase is pretty significant. I believe that ext4 is default for Ubuntu on the next release (9.10), but available but not default in the current release (9.04). You can convert a filesystem currently as ext3 to ext4, but the performance increase may not apply to the existing ...


10

I wrote blocks (née lvmify) which does this conversion in-place. It works by shrinking the filesystem a bit, moving the start of the filesystem to the end of the partition, and copying an LVM superblock (preconfigured with the right PV/LV/VG) in its place.


10

MiniTool partition wizard is a free (for home use) partition manager that can format a partition as EXT2/3/4 from windows - http://www.partitionwizard.com


9

I would use NTFS instead. It can easily be read/written to by Linux, Windows and OS X (among others). Considering the intended use and the fact that it is an external drive, I see no reason why you should go through the hassle that using ext4 will be. If this were your primary hard drive, perhaps the advantages of ext4 (briefly, less drive fragmentation ...


9

Paragon software offers ExtFS for Windows 2.0 for free for personal use. It allows to read and write ext2 ext3 and ext4 from all Windows OS http://www.paragon-software.com/home/extfs-windows/ It appears to be somewhat similar to Linux Reader from Diskinternals, that can mount all ext, HFS and ReiserFS too, but read-only. ...


9

EXT2FSD works for reading ext4 filesystems, though not all of ext4's capabilities are supported.


9

EXT4 above all says it will boot your OS faster. Ubuntu 9.04 should be booting up to 30% faster. If this is the only practicall use I would be stunned, since my Ubuntu boxes boot so fast I cannot even go get me a cup of coffee... But you can use larger harddrives, have larger files, more security is built in to safeguard data from crash and last but not ...


9

Have you looked into dumpe2fs? You can use it as follows: dumpe2fs -b /dev/$partition E.g. dumpe2fs -b /dev/sdd1


8

There is now another solution - Paragon ExtFS for Windows, which acts as a file system driver and so you don't need to use a specialized program to access your files. From the website: - Fast and easy read/write access to Ext2 / Ext3 / Ext4 under Windows - The only solution with Ext4 read - write support! - Easy-to-install and supports Windows 8 / 7 / ...


8

Linux Reader This program plays the role of a bridge between your Windows and Ext2/Ext3/Ext4, HFS and ReiserFS file systems. Linux Reader Website Features Integrated with Windows Explorer Reader for Ext2/3/4, ReiserFS, Reiser4, HFS, HFS+, FAT, exFAT, NTFS, ReFS, UFS2 Can create and open disk images Freeware


8

There are two factors that may be interacting. Unlike Windows you can delete files that are open. If you delete a movie that is being streamed, it will be removed from the directory, but will still exist as a file until the streaming program closes it. Once the streaming software closes it, the space will be released. The fuser -m command can be used ...


7

There are two main reasons for the performance difference, and two possible reasons. First, the main reasons: Increased Performance of ext4 vs. NTFS Various benchmarks have concluded that the actual ext4 file system can perform a variety of read-write operations faster then an NTFS partition. Note that while these tests are not indicative of real-world ...


7

I think it would be simpler to change the fstab entry to: /dev/sda8 /media/foo ext4 rw,user,exec,umask=000 0 0 umask=000 means that anyone can read, write or execute any file or directory in foo. The usual default is 022, which means that users cannot write.


7

Hmm, I haven't tried this, but Cygwin has mke2fs in the e2fsprogs package. Take a look at: http://superuser.com/questions/314997/how-to-format-ext2-in-windows-xp and the caveat about special device names the Answer mentions: http://www.cygwin.com/cygwin-ug-net/using-specialnames.html Cygwin is over at: http://www.cygwin.com/


7

Do ext4 filesystems need to be defragmented? Yes (but very rarely). If so, how do I defragment them? Copy all the files off the partition, erase the files from the partition, then copy the files back onto the partition. The file system will intelligently allocate the files as you copy them back onto the disk. If not, could you post a simple ...


7

I have been using ext4 partition for over a year. I often run out of space, moved a lots of files in and out etc etc... these things are bad for fragmentation and yesterday I checked for fragmentation for the first time and only 2 files (not % just two files) were fragmented on windows partition that was used for about a year longer with much more free ...


7

Paragon Partition Manager 11 Free Edition is Windows-based, supports ext4 and is very easy to use . Although claiming a smart resize/move wizard, I have no idea how smart it is on moving ext4 from its beginning, but being one of the best partition managers around it is certainly worth a try. Another one that you could try is MiniTool Partition Wizard Home ...


6

AFAIK, there's no way to convert NTFS to ext4. These two FSs store information in much different way. Maybe what you can do is to move those files somewhere, then format the partition to ext4 and move them back.


6

Asking "Will ext4 work with my harddisk" is similar to asking "Will this font work with my paper?". Any normal harddisk (or SSD) is essentially a very large blank sleet. Ext3 and ext4 are ways in which Linux divides that large blank sheet in smaller parts, for individual files. Like fonts, within reasonable bounds you can use any file system with any ...


6

I have not tested this, but this project's driver claims to be able to let Windows access it. Whether there are specific applications that can, or cannot, use it, you would probably just have to test. Support writing to ext4 volumes w/ flex_bg and the FAQ says that these systems are supported: Windows 2000, xp, 2003, Vista, Win7 (X86, AMD64) I ...


6

you will have to use 3rd party tools to access EXT4 file system on windows 8.Some options include : Ext2Fsd DiskInternals Linux Reader Ext2explore you may find more info here - http://www.howtogeek.com/112888/3-ways-to-access-your-linux-partitions-from-windows/ HTH


6

You can try out Ext2Read, it seemingly works with 8.



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