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9

The second port is for additional power. Some PCs can't provide enough power on a single port. If your drive works on your PC with one port, you're okay. No difference in transmission speed or performance.


5

I've actually run a hard drive with failing sectors for a while. I primarily used it for transient data, and one day, poof. It stopped working. This is a VERY BAD IDEA Lets start with the 300 pound gorilla. You will need to replace the drive sooner rather than later. The data corruption is a result of the same sort of issues that are causing the bad ...


4

Your external drive has two parts/devices, a USB/storage "controller", and an actual hard drive. The controller in the external enclosure handles the interface between the drive in the enclosure and the USB connection you'll use to attach it to a computer. If the controller still works yet the drive itself is dead, you'll see the USB controller as a USB ...


3

Normally the 3 1/2 inch hard drives need the second USB for additional power whereas the 2 1/2 inch external HD's do not need the second USB


2

No one can say with certainty whether or not and HDD will fail regardless on noise. However additional noise can certainly be considered a warning sign. As to thei" "How safe is it to keep important backup information on there (assuming I didn't have another copy)?", again no one can answer it, but if the info is that important common sense suggests backing ...


2

You can indeed use a Raspberry pi as a nas, and making it available on the Internet is easy, you just need a service like NoIP amd some basic knowledge of Linux. You should need a samba server for lan sharing (samba is windows sharing protocol) and an ftp server for remote access. But take in mind that over the Internet thr the maximum download speed is ...


2

The issue is that XP doesn't directly support exFAT. Support for exFAT was introduced with Vista SP1 and is included with Windows 7. You can add support for exFAT in XP and Server 2003 by installing an update available here: Description of the exFAT file system driver update package XP will not format a volume over 32GB as FAT32 although some third party ...


2

"Initialize Disk" is an option given by "Disk Management" only to a new drive. Initializing the disk will erase all the data on your drive, and will ask you to create a new partition / partitions so as to make the disk usable. If you had data on your drive and if it was important, and Windows is showing you this option you need to consider taking your drive ...


1

My way: Half throttle As with all suggestions here: DISCLAIMER: DO THAT AT YOUR OWN RISK. I got an unhappy Western Digital "Eco" Drive wd10ezrx harddrive which I am recovering at the moment. It was clicking since yesterday and today I tried to access some of files which took quite some time. And the clicking got even louder (or was it just me?). Well, I ...


1

From Disk Utility, select the partition on the left (not the drive) you want to back up. Then on the menu bar, select File -> New Image From Disk. In the options, select the location where you want to save it and choose Compressed from the type dropdown. That will create a compressed .DMG file of the entire drive. Will it fit in 628GB of space? That's ...


1

Run Chkdsk N: /r command to mark the sector unusable if its bad sector and recovers readable information.


1

This error occures when the external disk appears offline for a short period of time while reading. In such cases Windows wouldn't resume reading after the disk becomes available again. Possible causes include: instable USB contact or cable instable power supply over USB instable HDD controller Check that all USB connectors are sitting firmly. If you ...


1

First up, check that your source hard drive is okay. From a command prompt run the chkdsk command to see if it finds any errors (e.g chkdsk e: ) Without other parameters it will run in read only mode - it could be that the disk or the data itself has an issue in the last 1% that it is trying to copy. Do you have enough space on your local machine to copy ...


1

Yes, you can. As you mentioned, you will need to temporarily short pin 14 (green) to any common wire (black) to turn it on. Also, since you won't have any sort of case, be careful to not touch or short the circuit board on the underside of the hard drive.


1

It will not explode. As long as your SSD fits into that boatd (which it will) then you can start using it. No issues there. But, as a commenter said, your SSD will be slow since that's a USB2.0 connection.


1

The normal method would be to remove the drive and get an USB to IDE/SATA connector. Plug the drive into that and see if you can see the drive. If so, the external case was the problem. If not or if you can see the drive, but not read it, you could then try and connect it directly to the IDE or SATA interface on your motherboard and use something like ...


1

I assume by "dead" you mean physically they no longer function. My understanding is that under these circumstances their are two options, but I don't know the details. Option 1 is if you a functioning identical drive you can remove the magnetic disc from the broken drive to the working one. This is risky, and I believe only works with identical drives so ...


1

Back up your drive just to be safe. It is possible the drive "always running" will shorted the life of the equipment. Running diagnostics on the drive would be a good idea. You can usually find them on the hard drive manufacturer's web site. There are often troubleshooting tips specific to drive noise as well. Below is an example of Seagate's ...


1

I know this won't solve your problem with CrashPlan but I had the same issue as you. CrashPlan was always telling me that that backup was unavailable for some obscure reason. Apparently maintenance of the files. The thing is it hadn't back up anything for the last 28 days. I decided to give a go to Duplicati and so far it seems to be working smoothly. ...


1

Use Disk Management after running DBAN, Start > Control Panel > System and Security > Administrative Tools > Computer Management > Storage > Disk Management. Click the unallocated space and create a new volume.


1

By your description the so called Y-cable is to provide additional power, since USB-Ports (up to USB 2.0) should provide only up to 500 mA (at least that is what USB specifications say, many USB ports do otherwise). So as already pointed out you should check the power rating of the MacBook's USB ports. I've got a 2,5" external HD (USB 2.0) working with just ...


1

A NAS is more than a disk, an enclosure, and an ethernet port: it includes the software to handle all of this (for instance, the handling of permissions, access lists, passwords, and so on) and the hardware that goes with that software. So what you need to buy is a diskless NAS; you will find many just about anywhere, online or in a store. Just make sure ...



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