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You've actually already found the answer -- btrfs was designed from ground up to sustain as much damage as a design can handle (e.g. physical damage is beyond any logical design can handle). To read more on btrfs, check out: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Btrfs https://btrfs.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Ubuntu_support ...


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It's possible, but if the drive is apparently working fine, the chances that it happened are low. And if it did happen, the chances that the corrupted data would be read with no apparent problems are very, very, very low. In other words, you might find a file the copying of which fails with an error message relating to "unable to read", "disk error", ...


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SSHDs are widely available but usually not provided as standard equipment in PCs. They are most useful for operations where the caching has an effect - e.g. you always go back to the previous piece of data. For completely random disk operations they have little positive performance effects. I have made some performance comparisons using HDD, SSHD and SSD ...


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If all you need to do is properly give permission rights, to specific users, over a drive then I recommend using a "Take Ownership" context menu. It will save you dozens of clicks and a reboot or two. It's worked for me in regards to internal/external drives and foreign/native users. Needless to say I haven't used anything else for quite some time. You can ...


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Here are some solutions: You format the drive (only do this if there is no important files onboard, or you've copied them off) You change the ownership of the drive to you, then remove the user If the drive gets moved from PC to PC, make sure no other PC is writing permissions to the drive. Check in the registry, under ...


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A couple of factors affect the speed of the backup. USB speed, hard drive speed, software settings in the backup software, and the speed of computer being used to interface with the drive. Backup software is typically slower due to the nature of what it's doing. Backing up files may take a long time depending on how many you have and where they're being ...


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If the external drive is in a USB enclosure, then there is no way to boot Windows 7 from it. Windows does not support booting from a USB drive even if the BIOS does. It's not a GRUB or boot loader thing. Windows 7 just doesn't support running from USB period.


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There are speed limitations, given by the use of an external interface that may not achieve the same speed as internal ones (the most common case is USB3, which has various speeds - all well under the typical SATA speeds). It is also true that magnetic drives will not suffer the difference that much, while SSD are way more usable as external boot drives. ...


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Those are several questions. Let me answer them in order: SSDs are absolutely the best option for your purpose. Recently I saw 120GB SSDs sell for under $50. So price should not be an obstacle. If you install a system on the external drive, you should have an eSata connection. Only that can boot normal installed operating systems. You cannot boot that from ...


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It will depend mainly on the program A. If A is using some temporary file to hold intermediate results of the processing it is doing on drive D:'s data then there is a possibility that the temporary file is created in A's location and removed after its job is done. This depends mostly on the implementation of A. But yes given the scenario that you are ...


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I'm not sure it applies to this RAID but WD's custom drive software (disable it once you can get your data off) is indicated a few times in this thread, as is disabling hard drive sleep mode, also mentioned recently here. Energy Saver Preferences | Uncheck put drives to sleep when idle There are disk diagnostics like smartmontools that report (and can run ...


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8 years ago my answer would of been different. Solid State Drives now are better than a HDD in every why except price. The boot much faster, take less power, are quieter, lighter, and now more reliable. He could use his SSD as a secondary/slave and have it do all the memory paging. I personally would use the SSD as the master/primary and use the HDD as a ...


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The setup is not entirely clear. The Ultrabay, is that where the DVD was located? Isn't it possible to swap the HDD and the SSD, so to put the normal harddisk in the Ultrabay? I have a Macbook, five years old, with DVD writer which can be replaced by a second harddisk or an SSD. You need a special tray to put in the place of the DVD writer, which has ...


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You might have better luck using a program like GNU ddrescue in Linux, it can try skipping over the bad "sticking" sectors and keep reading beyond them, recovering more of your data. I would stick to read-only operations until you have at least a copy of everything that's currently readable, even if there are corrupted sectors in your copy. Further write ...


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You can try to do this: reattach the drive and put the symbolic link again let it sync until all of the content is in dropbox remove the drive let Dropbox erase the folder content remove the symbolic link on the web, click on the button to show deleted content mark the folder for retrieval in your Dropbox client, in selective sync mark the folder so that ...



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