Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

There are lots of factors here that could affect this. Source drive - is this spinning disk or SSD? If spinning disk, the layout of the files could affect performance. As the two files are likely on different parts of the disk, this will incur head seek penalties. As you said, if you select two files at once, and initiate the copy that way, the OS will ...


13

First of all, you don't need the -r flag which is (from man cp): -R, -r, --recursive         copy directories recursively That is only useful when copying entire directories and their contents. Then, whenever your file names contain strange characters, you need to either escape them or protect them with single ...


12

I will defer you to this question. It seems that running two copy operations on the same disk concurrently (though started through separate copy operations) would indeed take longer as a result of the latency generated by the head seeking back and forth between the competing operations. If, however, the copy operations are started simultaneously, the large ...


12

Standard properties , that are not supported on all systems the same http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Add-tags-or-other-properties-to-a-file Tags and ratings, "that might want to be removed before sharing with others" (because they couldnt put that stuff in the comments they already didnt use :-) and NTFS files can hold ADS (alternate data ...


10

When you open the RDP client (but before you connect), click on "Options". Then select the "Local Resources" tab, click "More" at the bottom, and select the check boxes for the local drives you want to share/have access to. Then connect as usual. When you open "My Computer" on the remote server, you'll now see a new option - "C on [yourcomputername]" or ...


9

You can use rsync to do this, the command I use is rsync -tr "folder to copy from" "folder to copy to" e.g. rsync -tr /home/me/stuff/* /home/me/otherstuff/


9

It is also possible to do this with good old cp: Thanks to srcspider for reminding me to use -T! cp -ruT old-dir new-dir


8

You can Safely Remove after pausing the USB data transfer so there is no chance of corrupting your device partition or your data. Edit: Sorry I forgot to mention I disconnected the device and reconnected it and resumed the copy process without any problem. Update: After starting the transfer I paused the copy process, ejected the USB drive, inserted ...


8

You need to escape any special character cp -r \$somefile.class /folder2 Read more about escaping here http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/32907/what-characters-do-i-need-to-escape-when-using-sed-in-a-sh-script


7

This should do exactly what you're asking: (edit: no it does not!) xcopy <source dir> <destination dir> /T /E /O Edit: This should be closer to what you're looking for: robocopy <source dir> <destination dir> /E /CREATE Robocopy should come with Windows 7. Let me know if I got it right this time. :)


7

UltraCopier UltraCopier is a free and cross-platform copy utility that is currently in development, so it's not that neat and polished yet. Once you install it, it sits in your menu bar. It manages a copy list that allows you to queue copy or move jobs, which are then sequentially processed. You can also define the copy process priority as well as the ...


7

Why does the number of files make a different? Apparently you are focusing solely on the "copy the data" aspect of "copy a file". A file is more than just the data; it is an entity in a filesystem. A file has a name and attributes and permissions. All of this additional information about the file has to be duplicated along with the data when the ...


7

Probably because there are downsides to those like lots of I/O operations and a performance hit. A straight copy is probably better off performance, I/O, and system wise.


6

I have the same issue with network drives. I have tried MANY things, however, unfortunately I was unable to find a resolution using Windows Explorer / GUI. The two solutions I came up with in the end were either to use the command prompt which worked very well - just a little annoying, and in the end I settled with (Teracopy, available on Ninite for easy ...


6

Hands down the BEST large file copying utility in Windows is ESEUtil. Use the /Y switch. More info on the Technet blog here: http://blogs.technet.com/b/askperf/archive/2007/05/08/slow-large-file-copy-issues.aspx Here are a few of the faster-than-Explorer copying methods to try (command-line based unless noted), somewhat in order of speed from slower to ...


6

Robocopy is a built in tool in Windows that can be configured (via various switches) to copy, ignore errors, and essentially duplicate a directory structure. Teracopy is a similar tool that has a graphical interface and I believe can also be told to ignore errors or at the very least can tell if a file has already been copied and to skip those files.


6

Your bottleneck is hard-drive speed. Multi-core can't speed this up.


6

You could try taking an image of the entire folder/drive On Linux systems you can use dd to get a raw copy of the filesystem and copy it as a single large file. To extract the image onto Windows you may need to install cygwin or a program that is able to process dd images.


6

Absolutely! What I do is enable Local Drive Access then use robocopysource\\tsclient\shared_folder. You can also use a different UNC path if it's on the same network as the system you are connecting to. To view the shared folders you can access on the client computer (the one running the Remote Desktop Client), you can type NET VIEW \\TSCLIENT at the ...


6

I always use right-click drag'n'drop. That way, on releasing the file @ destination, I get a neat menu where I can choose to Copy, Move, Create Shortcut, or Cancel the operation. Works for all versions of Windows...


6

The $ character is used to signify a shell variable. If you file really starts with $ you should use single-quotes to prevent the shell from attempting to evaluate it as a variable: cp -r '$somefile.class' /folder2


5

Only a reference to the file in the HDD will be copied in memory, and once you paste the file, the actual data in the file will be copied to the new location. To validate that, try to copy a file from a CD-ROM, and before you paste it, remove the CD, then try to paste. You will get an error that the file does not exist, or something similar. So, that proves ...


5

Certainly possible with some PowerShell magic, but I think the best thing you can do is use Robocopy for such a task. It is built for that, super-fast (multithreaded), has a lot of error reporting and stuff built-in, and it won't let you down.


5

Try this in cygwin: find /cygdrive/f/images -name '*.jpg' -exec cp '{}' /cygdrive/c/Users/Me/Pictures/Phone \;


5

With large number of files, it is best to create tar archive so that you have less files to deal with. If you are using USB 2.0 external hard drive you should look at using USB 3.0, eSATA, or use a fast local network. What is your source OS? If both of your operating systems were Linux, you could pipe the files through tar, gzip, and ssh to the target ...


5

If the hard drive can be removed from the USB interface and onto SATA/ATA I would install it in the destination computer. You'll get much faster transfer speeds, as others have noted. For copying, assuming your on windows I would do a simple ROBOCOPY. It's about as fast as you can really hope for, though there are other alternatives. ROBOCOPY /E /B /MT ...


5

@wizlog, sniffing is the act of reading the contents of packets of data, regardless of the structure of the network those packets are traveling over. @silvercore, the answer is yes. Generally the sniffer would have to have access to the same network as you, but unless you are encrypting the file transfer the contents of any file or data transfered will be ...


5

It is possible. However, it will require physical access to your network. Anyone who can plug something into a network port on your hub, switch or router, can attempt to eavesdrop on your LAN traffic, with a different degree of success. Hubs: older equipment, now mostly replaced by switches. Extremely easy to eavesdrop, since every port sees everything ...


5

Everytime I try to copy files like 200 GB my computer will be laggy The hard disk is the slowest part of most any computer system, and you just told yours to spend the next several minutes (or longer) copying a very large file. The result is taking the biggest bottleneck to system performance and making it even worse.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible