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1

On Windows simply use the 7z file manager or any other explorer(-like) application that uses Unicode versions of API for file handling. And read: 1, 2, 3. Please be aware that this is ONLY a workaround for users. It is by no means in any way suitable for programming. The worst part is that the guys at Microsoft are mixing APIs which may lead a fully ...


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You can use: find -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\n" | sort -rn | uniq -d | xargs -I{} -n1 find -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate (replace md5sum with sha512sum to avoid collisions) or a "lint" tool like fslint, fdupes


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Not all programs lock files when opened for editing Windows has two types of file locks, shared locks and exclusive locks. Shared locks allow other programs to read the file but deny write access to other programs. Exclusive locks prevent other programs from accessing the file altogether. A program may use either type of lock as required. Programs can ...


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I too was totally frustrated by the stupid "Folder" + partial path listing. I finally figured out that there are both "Folder" and "Folder path" fields available. Right-mouse-click over the "Folder" column heading to change columns that are displayed in the results. Scroll through available fields and select "Folder Path" Then Right-mouse-click over the ...


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The link that Reeves posted led to creating a .ps1 file with this script inside of it. Running this new file in Windows Power Shell did open File Explorer pointing to the background image. I had to change the ExecutionPolicy to allow PS to run .ps1 files. However, opening PS each time and then running command was more of a hassle than I wanted, so I read ...


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I have found a website that has a script you can download and run on your machine, it gives you a popup for the location and name of the image running on your background. The reason you can't get your Windows 7 tweak to work is because the information is stored differently in the registry in Windows 8. In Windows 7 it's in plain text (plain English) and in ...


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It's because some programs make a copy of the file and open that file instead of the original one. That way, you can delete the original file without an error, since it's not being used by any program.


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You can go for the product Stellar File Wipe which will permanently wipe your selected data files in Windows in one go. It runs on Windows OS.


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I had a drive fail a while back. While it was failing, I made a back up to another drive. Now when I try to access those files (they are video files), the video played is a segment from another video file. Sadly, the file table on the other, failing drive was probably screwed up. So when you coped the files you copied what you have now; a mix of ...


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I assume you're talking about NAS via Samba since that is what the tutorial you've pointed to is using. Note that you probably won't need to worry about this: Your Windows created files won't defy any of the rules of Windows, and the Linux files that do are still accessible. Samba has a lot of options for handling this behavior ( ...


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Following the steps described in How to Customize Common Open File Dialog Box Places Bar in Windows: You can customize the buttons in the left part of your "Select file to import from" or any similar dialog. Add C:\Users\username\Links to "Places to display:" in your Local Group Policy Settings. and your favorite links will appear in the "Select file to ...


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The solution @jherran supplied should probably meet you needs. If you just want the script to give you the next filename, rather than create it for you, change "touch" to "echo" at the end of his script. However, this will get slower and slower as you add many files. If you have a need for sequential numbers, you could just write the current number out to ...


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Assuming you don't have many files in the video directory (in which case this approach is not very efficient), this simple peace of code may help: MAX=1000; PREFIX="out-" SUFFIX=".avi" for i in `seq 1 $MAX` ; do file="${PREFIX}${i}${SUFFIX}" if [ ! -e $file ] ; then break; fi done # this is the next available file name echo $file ...


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#!/bin/bash LAST=$(find . -maxdepth 1 -name "*.avi" -type f -printf "%p\n" | sed -e s/.\\/out-//g -e s/.avi//g | sort -g | tail -1) touch out-$(($LAST + 1)).avi The first line picks the last modified avi file in the directory (no recursive), and extract the number in it's name. Second line add 1 to the previous name and generate the file.


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You could use seq to generate the values, then touch to create the files. for n in $(seq 1 5) do touch out-${n}.avi done


2

I don't know the context, but the following loop contains all the elements you will need:- n=0; while (($n < 10)); do ((++n)); echo name=out-$n.avi; done This will list the first 10 files in your sequence. After your edit, I see several answers. A simple modification of my original loop would be:- n=1; while [ -f out-$n.avi ]; do ((++n)); done; echo ...


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I like XtraFinder It's an enhanced version of Finder. You get Cut & Paste and a bunch of other features. And it's free.


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I have developed a hybrid JScript/batch command line utility called JREN.BAT that can rename files or folders by performing a regular expression search and replace on the names. It is pure script that will run natively on any Windows machine from XP forward. Full documentation is embedded within the script. Assuming JREN.BAT is in your current directory, or ...


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Install the (free) version of TotalCommander and search for all files containing 0x0 ten times for example. Then look in the files what they really contain.


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I use Dolphin on KDE and NexusFile on Windows. It is a different experience but not too bad, and also reminds me of StupenDOS with the color scheme (not to show my age there).



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