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As always there is not nly one way to do this. My first thougth was to create a shellscript using find to create a filelist and den using rsync, scp or whatever to copy the files.. However, why do it complicated to achive a simple task? Actually, i dove into the man page of rsync and found the --max-size=SIZE and the --min-size=SIZE arguments.. Use these to ...


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try using recuva to recover the files or try loading linux from a usb and see if it can read it.


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You should use the scp command, which allows one to copy files from one system to another using the SSH protocol, rather than the cp command. If your local computer is a Linux or OS X system, then you likely already have scp on the system. If your local computer is a Microsoft Windows system and you are using PuTTY, it also has a command line utility, pscp. ...


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In the past many users used Microsoft Windows Easy Transfer. But Windows 10 does not have the Windows Easy Transfer program anymore. you will need to use a tool like PCmover to get your apps because most programs need to be registered in the windows registry in order to work correctly. Microsoft recommended it and provides a limited use free copy on their ...


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Never mind - copying the files using Ubuntu and GNU cp -a turned out to work fine, although I had to make the backup volume a linux file system (I used ext3) since trying to copy onto an HFS+ backup volume using hfsprogs crashed cp with a segfault leading to a broken HFS+ backup volume and a cp process with couldn't be killed and made a reboot necessary... ...


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I assume you are copying from a source drive that stores your media. The simplest answer is to disable autoplay, or adjust your autoplay settings. Check out this help site (Microsoft)



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