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3

The seemingly missing space can be occupied by many sources. The three most common candidates are: Other partitions (including hidden ones) Hidden/system folders System Restore files


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The product TreeSize Professional has an interesting feature to track down increases of used disk space: It has the ability to compare the current state with a previous one and show the differences. The previous state can either be a scan exported from TreeSize or a Windows shadow copy which Windows e.g. creates along with a system restore point. A 30 ...


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You may be nested deeper than you were previously if you are using the Windows user folders under C:\%HOMEPATH%\Documents etc. or any number of other reasons. Flattening your structure with shorter names is really your only option. To clean up the offending directory, make sure you have your files safely stored in a new folder and clean up the old one ...


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Duplicate Commander is a possible solution on Windows: Duplicate Commander is a freeware application that allows you to find and manage duplicate files on your PC. Duplicate Commander comes with many features and tools that allow you to recover your disk space from those duplicates. Features: Replacing files with hard links Replacing files ...


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I digged in this problem and I decided to create a project git-store-meta for it. git-store-meta is a perl script which integrates the nice features of git-cache-meta, metastore, setgitperms, and mtimestore. It should serve a good compromise of the flexibility, functionality, performance, and cross-platform portability and consistency.


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Without a prior made image of this drive this is not possible. The files have been marked as deleted and you will have to recover them onto another drive then move them back to where you want them. Do not recover the files to the hard drive you are recovering as this will possibly lead to data loss. Recover to another drive and then once you have verified ...


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for those who might google this up in the future: I just found out that in Linux, one can do ntfsls -iaR /dev/sdb1 -i = show inode (i.e., MFT record no.), -a = display all (no idea what it does but it can't harm), -R = recurse into subdirectories, /dev/sdb1 is the partition device file or an NTFS image file. This produces a nice long greppable list of ...


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First, the conversion process saves a copy of all the prior system metadata in the new metadata, which can take up a substantial amount of space on large drives. Second, the conversion process is messy, resulting in extremely large extents, since the extents in EXT4 are also large, and BTRFS will inherent their size. The allocated size becomes ...


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I ended up using Test Disk to open the disk through the console with the help of This article. Then I just copied the important files to my computer.


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GNU's dd (at least version 8.23) has the following conversion flag notrunc do not truncate the output file which does exactly what you want; here is a small example: $ cat foo foobar $ echo -n XX | dd of=foo bs=1c seek=1 conv=notrunc 2+0 records in 2+0 records out 2 bytes (2 B) copied, 0.000283698 s, 7.0 kB/s $ cat foo fXXbar


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I personally use daily backups to two external devices and one cloud backup. That being said, only information that isn't sensitive ends up in the cloud.



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