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76

There's no such thing as FAT64, at least not at this time. There's exFAT which some people refer to as FAT64. Why do they do this? The history of the File Allocation Table is quite involved. These days, the most common implementations are FAT32 (though this is increasingly uncommon) and ExFAT. FAT32 was a significant improvement over the older FAT file ...


25

Rany is mostly correct. However the FAT was not based on the length field, it was based on the size of the index value. So, with floppies you had FAT12, where each cell in the FAT table was 12 bits, then FAT16, and then FAT32, which was 32 bits in size, BUT only USED 28 bits. ExFat also uses 32 bit cell entries, but ALL 32 bits are used, and allows for 2^32 ...


12

While exFAT borrows some concepts of FAT, there are major differences, so the claim that exFAT is (basically) FAT64 is simply wrong. Between FAT12 and 16 only the size of the allocation table was changed. FAT32 had an even larger (32 bits per entry) allocation table, some new concepts (a variable address for the root directory, quick lookup table for the ...


6

If you check the fine print, you may find that 1M is defined as 1,000,000, not 1,048,576. And 1G is defined as 1,000,000,000, not 1,073,741,824 This has been a trick used by hard drive manufacturers for decades. And it appears that the memory card people have picked up the same trick from hanging out with their sleazy hard-drive marketing friends.


2

The only answer can be, "No, unless it works, then yes.". This will vary from application to application, and with differant versions within applications. Most applications use shared libraries and components, that are installed with the first piece of software that uses them. This has several implications: Some important components of your software may ...


2

I've contacted author of e2fsprogs and asked this question. After consultation I've upgraded to the newest version (1.43) from github. In normal mode not many things have changed. Memory usage is slightly better (90MB instead of 100MB) but -D option (use direct_io omit buffers/caches) while making process twice or three times longer it reduces memory ...


2

Yes, exFAT is the official name and FAT64 is its synonym.


1

By default Linux uses the "relatime" mount option for all file systems, which only updates the atime field if it is more than 24 hours stale, or if atime < mtime (since some mail readers use this to determine whether three is unread mail in a /var/mail/XXXX file). This significantly reduces the number of metadata writes. There is also the "noatime" ...


1

You don't use the hosts file to block an IP address. You use it to block a domain name - well you don't block it, you redirect it. It's like changing your phones contact list. When you enter 000000 for your mom's phone number, you will get a non existing number warning when calling her via the contact list. If you know her number (IP address) by head, you ...


1

The underlying media (flash memory) is measured in binary units, but flash cells become damaged over time. The "leftover" space is used to balance wear so that the media lasts longer than each individual cell.


1

Reasonably recent Linux kernels (added sometime in the 2.6 series) can extend ext3/4 filesystems online (ie. while mounted): localhost root # lvcreate -L100M -n test vg0 Logical volume "test" created. localhost root # mkfs.ext4 /dev/vg0/test mke2fs 1.42.13 (17-May-2015) Creating filesystem with 102400 1k blocks and 25688 inodes Filesystem UUID: 1d97763f-...


1

Files saved on FAT32 file system can be executed from Linux, Your problem is elsewhere. When attaching FAT32 to Linux permissions are set with the mount and thus only once. Any attempts to change permissions to already connected FAT32 are silently ignored. Because Ubuntu generally connects the flash drive automatically, it explicitly passes 'noexec' ...


1

For a real world example, I just recorded my free space, then I created a large directory structure and subtracted the new free to find how much space was used. I created directories 0-6 for each day of the week, then inside directories 0-23 for hours of the day, then 0-59 for minutes of the hour. In total its 10,080 directories. My disc usage changed by 6,...


1

Well you can put files anywhere long as things can access them properly, however cluttered filesystems are a headache if someone comes in later. /srv is most logical plus if you follow Filesystem Hierarchy Standard it would go here. If you do multiple domains you can do /srv/domain1 /srv/domain2 etc etc then subfolder out inside there /ftp /www /tftp /logs ...



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