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0

They remain linked in all cases, ie. whether moved or renamed, and even if the move is performed via cut&paste.


1

In the local mode, Administrator can change the ownership of any file/folder even he wasn't owner of files: To take ownership of a file or a folder, follow these steps: Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, then click Properties. Click the Security tab, click Advanced, then click the Owner tab. Click Edit. Note: If you are prompted for ...


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No, the sd* names are assigned sequentially, based on which disk was detected first. If you need a persistent name, udev already provides them based on several properties such as filesystem labels / UUIDs; partition labels / UUIDs (GPT only); disk attachment paths; SCSI WWNs; and so on. Take a look at /dev/disk: ┌ rain ~ ┘ tree /dev/disk/ /dev/disk/ ├── ...


1

Since posting this question, I did quite a lot of research and testing. I could not find any solution for Windows, and Linux did not have that kind of feature by itself. The only thing I found was a file system called ZFS. But unfortunately, ZFS seemed to be a file system for Solaris, an OS I had never used before. It seemed there was a way to install ZFS ...


1

With your specific example you could install the 3TB disk, copy the entirety of the other 2 disks. Then remove the 1TB and just join the 2TB to an new spanned volume created off of the new 3TB. other than that I don't know of any controller or software that will do what you're asking.


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Sounds like your builds are rather large, so I'd stay away from massive swap + tmpfs - this could indiscriminately force your system into swapping while building which will ruin your build performance. For my build systems I only had the ext2 and ext3 options, ext2 was faster (understandably - no journaling). Look also at tune2fs and mount options in ...


0

Hate to be that guy but...it depends. It's all dependent on your workload. Only testing will show the best choice. If this is a build server, you will probably be CPU limited anyway so I'd go with the simplest solution. Using tmpfs/swap will tax the heck out of your CPU when the data is getting pushed and pulled from memory. I wouldn't go this route since ...


0

You can also use du -csh foldername/* which gives file and folder sizes under "foldername" separately and the total size in last row.


0

Is there an option to bypass this folder from the backup app? The /sys/kernel folder is created by kernel/device drivers dynamically and you don't need to back up them. If you're still having problem with the /sys/kernel/debug/hid folder, try to umount the /sys/kernel/debug folder temporally. umount /sys/kernel/debug and mount it back after backing up(or ...


-1

Download and the latest version of daemontools lite. Once it's installed, rightclick on the .zip file and select open with. Browse to where daemontools was installed. Once found, daemontools will create a virtual drive which contains the content of the .zip file - it will be created on next available drive letter.


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Your question is a bit difficult to understand (ie its difficult to understand how you are attempting to do the mount, so I can't really advise why its failing), but No, a mounted filesystem can be any type the kernel can recognise, and different files can, and are commonly, different to the root system. (NFS is a prime example, as is mounting USB keys ...


-1

Another option to "unzip" the file, is the use Daemon Tools and map the zip file as a virtual drive from where you can copy the content to desired location. This way you don't need space for both the .zip file and it temporary space when unzipping it using either WinZip, 7-Zip, WinRar.


0

I don't know if this will actually solve your problem, but this article has some nice hints, particularly note the -a -r options you have to apply. Unable to resolve data corruption warning with fcs This is stupid. I find myself answering my own question again. It says, Leaving filesystem unchanged. suggesting that nothing is changed. This ...


0

Paul's comment was correct: the filesystem was corrupt and fsck confirmed it.


1

Yes you can use tar to create an archive on the ntfs filesystem. tar archives preserve linux owner and permission info. If you use linux acls and extended attributes look for the options in the tar manpage. You can also save your ownership and permission info recursivly by getfacl -r folder > permissions.txt. You can save that file, too and restore with ...


-2

Your question is self-contradictory: We've carefully ensured that the command will not write past our intended output region. How can we now subtly break things by choosing a bad combination of bs and count? How would we know? If you chose a bad combination of bs and count, the only thing you could break is writing past your intended output region ...


2

Help! dd is scary! You are not alone. From tips for Linux: The ' dd ' command is one of the original Unix utilities and should be in everyone's tool box... Some people believe dd means "Destroy Disk" or "Delete Data" because if it is misused, a partition or output file can be trashed very quickly. Since dd is the tool used to write disk headers, boot ...


0

I am no expert in the matter, so IMHO: usb flash keys where no part of it is doing writes should survive repeated power loss (unplugging). But there is still a sort of bit rot possible, called read-disturb.


61

Use another file archiving utility (such as 7-Zip) to extract the zip file. Not all .ZIP features are supported by the Windows Compressed Folders capability. For example, AES Encryption, split or spanned archives, and Unicode entry encoding are not known to be readable or writable by the Compressed Folders feature in Windows versions earlier than ...


3

Although netrw does allow you to delete and rename files I doubt you did anything harmful, since netrw prompts you for any potentially destructive action. The "recording" message you got was from the "macro recording" feature of Vim. See: :help recording Although the directory modified time changing does concern me. If it were a local directory I would ...


0

There are many reasons on why a program may want to get to a specific offset. Among the reasons services like Shadow Copy might need to do this, and it's impossible to say why, unless we see what they are actually reading. An example is using shadow copy to mirror a volume, then you would do a stream of data (if observed would be a stream of hex data), ...


3

It sounds like your main concern is to avoid making a mess of your second hard drive and you're looking to the default directory structure of Windows's system drive as an example of how to organise your files neatly. This is not the main purpose of this structure; these directories have a specific meaning in Windows. For example, program files belong in the ...


1

@mafu quotes Raymond Chen as writing: Windows 95 introduced Windows Explorer and along with it the term folder. In fact, Microsoft Windows 95 borrowed many UI design ideas from Apple. And Apple in turn borrowed them from Xerox. Both the name "folder" and the visual metaphor of folders were part of the Xerox Star office environment in 19821. 1 - ...



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