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It's a widespread Linksys issue. I just experienced it on my E4200 v1. Google "E4200 File Loss" you'll know you're not the only one.


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you may (most likely) have limited access you can't 'browse' any other folders. The fact you don't see any . or .. is normal when using the ls command, instead if you type ls -a This should list the . and .. The most likely cause is either the folder is empty or they have set your FTP account up with the wrong permissions


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The link above pretty much covers this, but this question seems to make it much more clear that it's just not convenient to run Explorer as an Administrator as of Windows 7. However, there was an answer without much attention that expands on what you said about using Notepad running as Administrator as a mini-explorer. I tested it out quickly, and I could ...


1

Duplicate Commander is a possible solution on Windows: Duplicate Commander is a freeware application that allows you to find and manage duplicate files on your PC. Duplicate Commander comes with many features and tools that allow you to recover your disk space from those duplicates. Features: Replacing files with hard links Replacing files ...


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You may be nested deeper than you were previously if you are using the Windows user folders under C:\%HOMEPATH%\Documents etc. or any number of other reasons. Flattening your structure with shorter names is really your only option. To clean up the offending directory, make sure you have your files safely stored in a new folder and clean up the old one ...


3

The seemingly missing space can be occupied by many sources. The three most common candidates are: Other partitions (including hidden ones) Hidden/system folders System Restore files


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First, get the index file: wget -O index.html "$URI" Then, rewrite the URLs in it: sed -i '/_sh\(\.html\)/_lg\1/g' index.html (I used sed, but you might prefer, e.g. an XSLT-based approach. Take your pick.) Now, tell wget to grab all the pages/info/*, using the modified index file and with its original location as the starting base URI: wget ...


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I had the same problem, and chmod alone didn't do the trick. I first had to change the owner (user and group) of the files I wanted to remove. sudo chown -hR root:admin dir_to_delete Explanation: sudo: make sure you have the proper rights chown: Linux command to change owner of a file -hR: change owner of directory and all subdirectories. I found it ...


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First, the conversion process saves a copy of all the prior system metadata in the new metadata, which can take up a substantial amount of space on large drives. Second, the conversion process is messy, resulting in extremely large extents, since the extents in EXT4 are also large, and BTRFS will inherent their size. The allocated size becomes ...


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The program Robycopy could be a solutions for you. With the command bellow, Robocopy creates a directory tree structure containing zero-length files only (that is, no file data is copied) and does the entire directory Robocopy SourceDir DestDir /CREATE /MIR The GUI have loads of good tooltips for all the flags to the command. I use the Command Line GUI ...


-1

Not being a BTRFS guy (I roll with ZFS for the time being), I know enough to say that BTRFS is a Copy-On-Write filesystem. That means, each new write will be at a different location, not overwriting the old data. Instead, it will use additional space until you tell it explicitly to remove the old data. The benefit is, that you can often roll back to the old ...


2

The product TreeSize Professional has an interesting feature to track down increases of used disk space: It has the ability to compare the current state with a previous one and show the differences. The previous state can either be a scan exported from TreeSize or a Windows shadow copy which Windows e.g. creates along with a system restore point. A 30 ...


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Probably not what you're looking for, but symbolic links have proven useful to me in the past. For instance, many programs are hardcoded to store things in APPDATA but I generally don't want all of this "data" on my "system" sdd. Here, symbolic links come in handy. It can be quirky, and I wouldn't recommend symlinking your entire appdata folder, do it ...


1

I personally use daily backups to two external devices and one cloud backup. That being said, only information that isn't sensitive ends up in the cloud.


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Are these files in %USERPROFILE%\App just a symbolic link to the ones under C:\App? If so then users are actually running it right from the original folder. A symbolic link isn't a copy of the original file, it is the original file.


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There are a lot of answers with scripts to find all hardlinks in a filesystem. Most of them do silly things like running find to scan the whole filesystem for -samefile for EACH multiply-linked file. This is crazy; all you need is to sort on inode number and print duplicates. find /filesystem-to-scan -xdev -type f -links +1 -printf '%16i %p\n' | sort -n | ...


1

I digged in this problem and I decided to create a project git-store-meta for it. git-store-meta is a perl script which integrates the nice features of git-cache-meta, metastore, setgitperms, and mtimestore. It should serve a good compromise of the flexibility, functionality, performance, and cross-platform portability and consistency.


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It depends if its a single partition or a few. I'm rather find of kpartx for actual raw images with more than one drive kpartx -a -v foo.raw load up the .raw file, then you can mount the /dev/mapper devices as if they were normal drives. There's a pretty nice, more complete set of examples on the nfolampblog If its a single drive joejoe21b's answer should ...


1

GNU's dd (at least version 8.23) has the following conversion flag notrunc do not truncate the output file which does exactly what you want; here is a small example: $ cat foo foobar $ echo -n XX | dd of=foo bs=1c seek=1 conv=notrunc 2+0 records in 2+0 records out 2 bytes (2 B) copied, 0.000283698 s, 7.0 kB/s $ cat foo fXXbar


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I ended up using Test Disk to open the disk through the console with the help of This article. Then I just copied the important files to my computer.


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You can boot Hiren's BootCD and use Mini WindowsXP to easily copy files from your old drive to new location (i.e. external HDD).


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for those who might google this up in the future: I just found out that in Linux, one can do ntfsls -iaR /dev/sdb1 -i = show inode (i.e., MFT record no.), -a = display all (no idea what it does but it can't harm), -R = recurse into subdirectories, /dev/sdb1 is the partition device file or an NTFS image file. This produces a nice long greppable list of ...


0

If the main use case is storing VM images or databases, and you are not interested in accepting the potential performance issues in order to get the data integrity advantages of btrfs, then I can't think of any reason why you would want to choose btrfs over xfs or ext4. Disabling copy-on-write for just the VM image directory (using chattr +C) is mostly ...


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I suspect the windows 8.1 virtual drive is the culprit. Typically, whenever you virtualize an environment, you have some overhead to deal with(which will slow down the speed of saving and reading files from within a virtual environment like Parrallels). What little information I was able to find on the web indicates that Parrallels doesn't offer any type of ...


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I cant offer you a comparison but I do use Aufs. If you follow the instructions in this blog post you can see via Example 3 how you can specify which branch can be read-only or read-write. Typically the first file system is by default written to unless you specify otherwise as per example 3. mount -t aufs -o br=/read/write/dir=rw:/read/only/dir/=ro -o ...


1

Without a prior made image of this drive this is not possible. The files have been marked as deleted and you will have to recover them onto another drive then move them back to where you want them. Do not recover the files to the hard drive you are recovering as this will possibly lead to data loss. Recover to another drive and then once you have verified ...


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Be warned: I tried the advanced fix option in fdisk and rebooted my system. This had disastrous effects in that my /dev/sda8 became /dev/sda5 in my case and the /boot/grub does not change as a result. So the obvious fix to this problem to avoid the mangling is: $ fdisk /dev/sda x f w $ update-grub $ grub-install but first make sure you have grub commands ...


0

DiskInternals Linux Reader is what you are looking for.



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