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I have investigated my HD issue further and it is looking more and more like a corrup MFT and MFT Mirror, tried using TestDisk and no luck, as it seems that my MFT is overwritten when I formatted last and couldn't find or construct an older one. I've been looking online for a way to retrieve the old MFT back, again no luck. Any ideas? Thanks ...


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My answer is simply to format a flash drive to FAT 32 put it into a spare USB Port ( I recommend a 3.0 USB flash drive and 3.0 USB port )You can add to and remove from both drives. I then sync my devices from my Mac boot drive using iTunes.


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A user-friendly way of doing this is using the Library feature in Windows.


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You need to provide a name for the snapshot under /snap e.g. $ btrfs subvolume snapshot / /snap/root If you don't provide a name btrfs will use the name of the source subvolume. In your case the source subvolume is called / which is not a valid name for the snapshot. usage: btrfs subvolume snapshot [-r] <source> ...


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I forgot about this post sorry :/ I found the issue. The bus between CPU/memory on the motherboard failed (just a few bits of it). Hence all the strangeness (as well as kernel panics on live images). Thanks everyone for your help!


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Hmmm, last winter I read a article about F2FS on phoronix. It said that this fs was designed for flashmemory devices like pendrives. But I do not know the current state of development of the project. I think you have to search your favourite distros wiki about it. A other option is UDF, which is used on e.g DVDs, it is supported on linux,mac and windows. ...


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Run Chkdsk N: /r command to mark the sector unusable if its bad sector and recovers readable information.


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I just had cause to need to do this, and while the pax-based answer was good, it still ran into problems with accented characters. So I found it simpler to use tar and get it to replace all the non-permitted characters with underscores: cd /parent-of-source tar cf - Söurce | (cd /destination; tar xvf - --transform='s/[^A-Za-z0-9\/ ]/_/g') It is doubtless ...


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The files might have been deleted, but are still open in an application. The files don't exist on disk, but because the application still has them "open", the kernel can't remove them from the filesystem quite yet. Find the process using the files with sudo lsof | grep data/file1.txt And then try restarting/killing that application if it's not critical, ...


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They might have binary characters in the filename. For cat /data/file1.txt, try instead matching part of the name, and letting the shell figure out the rest of it: cat /data/*1.txt


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Rufus can do this. Start it up, then choose File system Large FAT32 uncheck Create a bootable disk uncheck Create extended label and icon files click Start Source code is available at GitHub


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Fat32 should be a little more Mac friendly than NTFS. Depends on how important some NTFS features are to you. From PCmag FAT32 is read/write compatible with a majority of recent and recently obsolete operating systems, including DOS, most flavors of Windows (up to and including 8), Mac OS X, and many flavors of UNIX-descended operating systems, ...


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You can create a Windows PE setup which typically runs from a bootable CD/DVD. It of course uses a RAM disk to write things during run-time but none of that persists between boots.


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Windows needs constant R/W access to local disk C:. (using SYSTEM account, and various SERVICE ACCOUNTS) Your user should not require R/W to anything but PROFILE. Unfortunately NTFS does not allow extended attributes and access controls. I am sure there is an equivalent way of accomplishing this in Windows, but I cannot imagine it making a difference from a ...


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By default, 5% of available disk space is reserved for the root user. This is usually a good thing for the partition where the / directory is mounted, but it may be not desiderable on other partitions. If you don't want to reserve disk space for the root user you can use the -m 0 option: Taken from here


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I check all recommended applications , and find out this one more useful. FreeFileSync That application have compare two folder you easily. If you use this commend in its filter "*" and use = button in under pages you just see each folders, that they are same in other location. enjoy it


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CentOS is a Linux distribution, not a filesystem. The limitations you refer to are, indeed, filesystem limitations. This Stack Overflow thread and this Server Fault thread have some good pointers to you.


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Where are metadata kept? When we talk about metadata, there are two types of metadata. The first type includes created date, last modified date, last accessed date. Depending on file system (i.e. NTFS / FAT / Ext3 etc...) there will be different "metadata" available, for example Windows owner and permission on NTFS. The first type applies to all files, ...


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After hours and days of research, I finally happened across a helpful YouTube video that showed how it's done. It appears that in all likelihood, just changing the path an d letting Windows copy the files over for you is going to report an error. You will end up with files that are in use. And this causes Windows to not complete the operation, and leave ...


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As response to recommendation to use fat (32?): I have done some performance tests and find out that fat32 has a very predictable time to write a file (2 GB needs two times of 1 GB + offset, 3 GB needs tree times of 1GB + offset). Performance of ext4 is slightly better than ext3. Both ext3 and ext4 are sometimes fast but need sometimes some extra time to ...


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Metadata is not stored (nor reported by usual file management tools) as files, it is stored on filesystem's data on disk. Depending on the nature / version of the filesystem, each entry will take some amount of disk space to represent the metadata information. Moreover alongside the space allocated in the Master File Table, some filesystems will also keep ...


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As you see in the last picture above, the only space that the file occupy on the flash, is the space for its contents [characters].So where is metadata file ? The "metadata file" is the directory that contains the file. That's basically what a directory is -- a collection of metadata describing the contents of the directory. I mean, when I move the ...


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Doesn't it occupy any size?!! Yes, but it's a small entry in a large pre-allocated block. That block is counted in the "used" portion of your disk. Adding an entry inside that block doesn't require the block to be expanded. Depending on the filesystem, eventually the block will be filled and extended somehow after a lot of filenames are added. Can ...


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The metadata depends on the file system. The most basic file systems usually used on exchangeable media is based on a DOS file system (FAT). DOS doesn't have users, and permissions. Or, more correctly, some of that information is carried in the 8th data bit of the file name. The only resource overhead that is used in a basic DOS FS is to account for the ...


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Yes, metadata occupies space. On NTFS it occupies 1024 bytes, to be specific. However, the information is not stored in the file, but in the master file table MFT. Specifically in MFT record #4 $AttrDef. See this Technet article for details: table 3.5 holds all MFT records defined. When a volume is formatted with NTFS, a Master File Table (MFT) file ...


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Getting fuse-ntfs to work is still your best option. Windows doesn't really support reading other than native file-systems. There are different tools (e.g. ufs2tools) that give read access to UFS2 filesystems on Windows. But none of them support writing AFAIK.


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I just ran into the same issue. I needed to add a drive to an existing RAID 5 array. I'm using MegaRAID WebBios v.6.1-65-Rel On the home screen you click on "Virtual Drives" then highlight the VD that you want to adjust. Then click the properties button, followed by "GO". This will take you to the properties window for your Virtual Drive Array. In the ...


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If you don’t have specific needs, use btrfs as you would use another filesystem. Separating /home is a good practice. Personally, on home servers my only subvolume is /etc, so I can make snapshots of the configurations. This can be automated with tools like snapper. Usually, there is little interest of restoring just a previous version of /var, because of ...


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I solved it! :) I run mountall.sh mountall-bootclean.sh that are in /etc/init.d One of them said that I had to remove something in the /etc/fstab to complete the upgrade I commented the line with /var/run in /etc/fstab, rebooted and everything is fine.


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This is kinda old, but being a critical issue, another testimonial is worth it. I have an external NTFS USB hard drive that I'm using for data (no OS-related files) with 2 different PCs. I used to get constant data loss on it until I isolated the problem. One of the PCs is rather old and slow (Windows XP) so I was using hibernate for faster restart times, ...


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Try to find run-lock.mount in one of the standard paths: /etc/systemd/system/run-lock.mount /run/systemd/generator/run-lock.mount /lib/systemd/system/run-lock.mount /usr/lib/systemd/system/run-lock.mount See if it's a bind mount or a regular tmpfs mount. If it's a bind mount, make sure the source directory exists; if it's tmpfs, make sure your kernel has ...


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On a Windows System use: cmd /c start http://superuser.com What this command does is: cmd Opens the command line window. /c is a parameter for the command line window. It tells the command line window to close itself after finishing. This command line window shall run the command start. start opens a new command prompt, to run a command. The ...


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CDs always have 2K sectors. If you actually need to store millions of files, your best bet will almost certainly be to compress them into a zip file. The zip64 format allows 2^64-1 files inside an archive, and is natively supported in File Explorer in Windows Vista and above, and by most third-party zip tools. You could also do a loopback filesystem if this ...


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You can. The drive will be unformatted. IMHO the quickest way of getting it done is by means of GParted Live (http://gparted.org/livecd.php). Just create a new MBR, a new partition of the FAT32 type and click apply changes. It should be done in seconds or a couple of minutes at most.


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You can stop the currently in-progress formatting session but this will leave the entire drive unformatted. If you start formatting the drive after this then it will start formating from the beginning.



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