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From the Command Prompt, you switch to the "root" of the C: drive using the CD command as follows: CD C:\ You can then view the files in the root directory with the command: DIR Finally, to delete files use the DEL command as follows: DEL filename /F Or to delete a folder use: RD foldername If the folder contains any subfolders, you must add the ...


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Have you tried simply typing: cd C:\ into the command prompt. Then, as an Administrator: DEL /F <unneeded file(s)> If, for any reason, the files aren't on the C: drive you will have to switch drives like this: <drive letter>: i.e D:


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Looks like bcache and the currently experimental bcachefs can be used to do just that. The RAM disk acts as a cache device and persistent storage as the backing device.


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It appears that nilfs > btrfs > ext4, based on my rough benchmarks. I did two tests, the synthetic fileserver test from file bench, and deduplicating a 1TB drive using the attic software. In each case the overall fastest was nilfs, followed by btrfs, and with ext4 being the slowest filesystem. This might be expected log structured filesystems essentially ...


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I frequently use a gparted live cd to shrink a windows partition (NTFS OR FAT32) and make the change i need on a hard drive. with some linux distro you can shrink the windows partition with gparted and then use the ' use free space ' option while installing linux.


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I can recommend these options: sshfs -o cache_timeout=115200 -o attr_timeout=115200 ... I believe this will avoid some of the round trip requests to fetch content or permissions for files. Those options are not recommended if the remote files might be updated without the local machine knowing, e.g. by a different user, or a remote ssh shell. In this ...


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First, fix your driver problem. If you attempt to repair the disk with the bad driver, the best you'll get is access to a portion of the partition. At worst, you'll overwrite critical data in the partition, thus making matters worse. With the driver problem fixed, you might be able to recover your original partition data with suitable partitioning software. ...


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MooseFS (v. >= 2.0) in Pro version has no SPOF. It is a fully POSIX-compliant distributed filesystem. It is mature and actively developed.


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The root user in linux/unix systems can write to a file even if the write flag is not set. Therefore he can change the contents of /etc/shadow or any other file independent from it's permissions. The passwd utility has the setuid bit set. See with: ls -la /usr/bin/passwd It should look like this: -rwsr-xr-x 1 root root 42824 Sep 13 2012 /usr/bin/passwd ...


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The problem originates from not verifying your Microsoft account against your computer. I accidentally encountered this, and it solved my problem. I admit, this is a major issue, and I did not see any indication from Windows that I will have limited permissions for file-system and other admin related actions. I am sorry I do not have pictures to guide you ...


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To complement the other answers already posted. I have been using MHDDFS for 10+ years now. I believe that it has some performance issues as discussed on damek but it just creates a virtual volume out of your existing mounts, super simple for me. Once installed it is just single line in /etc/fstab: mhddfs#/mnt/hdd1,/mnt/hdd2,/mnt/hdd3 /mnt/virtual fuse ...


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Windows 8.1 directory structure: source from wiki


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The Windows directory is the fundamental location for your Windows installation. If you perform a custom install of Windows and you don't format the destination partition the installer will rename the previous version of the Windows directory to Windows.old, thus you will then have two Windows folders (source: ...


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If you upgrade your Windows 7 to Windows 10 during the free upgrade phase, the windows cleanup tool can clean your previous windows installation files. I have cleaned 37GB off my main drive this way. Keep in mind, that you won't be able to downgrade back after this.


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If you were able to add an SSD format and mount it the RAID should be no problem. Root access might be required once to mount, and assign permission to the RAID, but not after that. A hardware RAID 5 or 6 will run circles around a software RAID because the RAID card has its own memory and CPU and your CPU does none of the work. Use a ,raid lingo, stripe ...


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I ran badblocks /dev/sdg1 on a 1TB HDD over USB 2.0, which is, according to the man page, what an mkfs.* -c command would do. The default test block size is 1KiB and it performs a read-only test by default. After 24 hours I aborted it: it had only tested 120GB and found more than 10000 bad blocks. As @nvram pointed out, it can be very slow when you actually ...


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Open Command Prompt as Administrator and run diskpart. In diskpart, execute the following commands: List disk Select disk X (where x is the disk you want to partition/format) Clean Create partition primary size=30000 (where 30,000 is the size in MB you want the partition to be, under 32GB) Select partition 1 Active Format Assign Exit


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Create a folder called /backup Open /etc/fstab Change mountpoint of /dev/sda6 to /backup Reboot Confirm it is mounted at /backup by typing mount into a terminal. Delete the other folder with rmdir (only deletes empty folders) Enjoy


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I think GNOME Activity Journal is able to track extended attributes. I couln't find anything about Tracker, so I made a file and added an attribute to test it: $ echo "Lorem ipsum sit amet consectetur" > ./x.txt $ setfattr -n user.testing -v "this is a test" x.txt Then run tracker-search "this is a test" and you get 0 results. If you run ...


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If you use a virtualization software like Oracle Virtual Box. You can create a full file system of ANY kind inside the VM. You can use samba to share file from the host (physical PC) to the guest (the virtual PC)


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Turns out just rewriting all of the files in-place: find . -type f -exec /usr/bin/echo {} \; -exec sed -i '' {} \; Correctly shrank the files. I haven't seen it happen again.


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rsync is the perfect solution as explained above. I'd just add -S to "handle sparse files efficiently" in case there is a docker devicemapper volume or similar to be copied.


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Not ideal, but I was able to fix one of my USB issues (2 with same problem) by putting it in a mac and erasing and reformatting. Second USB was labelled as "unreadable" by the mac and could not be formatted. Yes I am bringing up a 2 year old thread but it has 4k plus views so why not hey!


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wasabi is worth a shot. At your project root, the plain-text source will serve as a solid project overview and you can throw the same document at a browser for some fancier results. Granted, it's not a filesystem-based solution, but until all the filesystems around support something common, wasabi (or your own implementation of it) could well be the best ...


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If you open the Disk Utility app and compare both drives, the internal drive will have Owners Enabled set to Yes meanwhile on the external drive it will be set to No. Solution: Open the Finder app, select the external drive, choose Get Info from the File menu, and uncheck the box ignore ownership on this volume.


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I managed to solve this problem this morning. Here are the steps I took in case anyone else encounters this problem: Download a bootable linux .iso. I am running Ubuntu 14.04 x64 in my VM, so I decided to download the 64-bit Ubuntu 14.04 installation .iso from here. It shouldn't really matter what release you download, as long as it supports your file ...


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Usually the OS tries to do the task as fast as it can: When You copy, it will always have to write a copy of the file on the disk in another location. When You move a file, it depends of the circumstances: If You move to another partition/HDD/network location, it will also have to physically copy the fragments of the file. Note that this will take ...


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The entries in the left pane can be a bit confusing, particularly as they can appear to represent a fixed hierarchy, when they don't really do that. All they are is shortcuts. A list of arbitrary shortcuts with simple names, to take you to commonly used places. Some replies to specific points which may help: "This PC" seems to not even exist as any kind ...


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This question is pretty old, but you can look at default mount options for an ext filesystem with: tune2fs -l /dev/<device>


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The fdupes delete option is meant for just deleting duplicates. It requires that you preserve at least one of the duplicate files because once it deletes every duplicate but one, that last one is no longer a duplicate, so it is out of fdupes domain. Having said that, there are times when you want to delete all files anyway. So I made a patch to fdupes that ...



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