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This isn't exactly what you are after, and maybe i'll think of something else in addition, but this is something you should know. SSH port forwarding You need to get an SSH server working on Computer B. So you can do from comp A SSH is like telnet but with more security and with TCP port forwarding features.You can ignore the telnet aspect of it ssh is ...


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This might be caused by a missing or wrong digital signature. Like Apple explains: If you run an unsigned app that is not listed in the firewall list, a dialog appears with options to Allow or Deny connections for the app. If you choose Allow, OS X signs the application and automatically adds it to the firewall list. [...] Some apps check their ...


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Yes, you are. From "man iptables" [!] -i, --in-interface name Name of an interface via which a packet was received (only for packets entering the INPUT, FORWARD and PREROUTING chains). When the "!" argument is used before the interface name, the sense is inverted. If the interface name ends in a "+", then any interface which ...


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Ebtables acts only on frames going through a bridge interface. If you want to block a site based on its MAC address, make a bridge and add your interface to it. Then route traffic via the bridge and use ebtables to prevent traffic out from the bridge to that mac-address, as such: ebtables -A OUTPUT -d 00:05:68:02:68:dd -j DROP It works.


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Nice looking router. Q1 Answer: No. The only traffic considered local would be, as you mentioned, ssh and webui traffic, as well as DHCP server traffic if you're utilizing the DHCP server feature of the router. Q2 Answer: Yes. That would drop all traffic destined for the router from the WAN. I suggest creating a rule named MgmtAccess (order it above the ...


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Potentially. For example, if you use the router on a small network to cache DNS requests, then the DNS traffic will hit the LOCAL interface. Same thing if you use it for DHCP and any other network service. See above. If you want use the router to cache DNS requests, then you will have to permit its LOCAL to talk to WAN, just like LAN does. Rulesets are ...


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UTM throughput would be the speed while "Unified Threat Management" options are enabled. Things like gateway anti-virus, web filtering, anti-spam, VPN tunnels, etc. The "UTM throughput of 24 Mbps" you're quoting seems to be specific in the Netgear specs, in that it's referring to UTM options that affect HTTP traffic specifically (content filtering, etc.). ...


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Well, this is an extremely open question. I assume every answer you get will be different. Hence, these answers are, unfortunately, opinion-based as well as based on experience. My suggestion here is definitely iptables. A decent guide for setting up a firewall can be found here, at the arch linux wiki. This firewall will simply block everything from ...


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Connect to your server with SSH and make a tunnel for SMB traffic from your client to your server. Something like: ssh -L 137:127.0.0.1:137 -L 138:127.0.0.1:138 -L 139:127.0.0.1:139 -L 447:127.0.0.1:447 you@your.server.address And then use: smbclient //localhost/Testing -U user This creates a tunnel that forwards traffic from the client computer ports ...


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On your router if you can run iptables, default drop anything incoming on the outward-facing interface, and then add exceptions: A simple example of what you describe, presuming eth1 is the outward-facing device: iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -j DROP iptables -I FORWARD -i eth1 -s ...



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