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48

Easy: In bits per second, that is: USB 1.1 = 12 Mbit/s Firefire 400 = 400 Mbit/s USB 2.0 = 480 Mbit/s FireWire 800 = 800 Mbit/s USB 3.0 = 5 Gbit/s USB 3.1 = 10 Gbit/s eSATA = Up to 6 Gbit/s (750 MB/s) right now as it depend on the internal SATA chip. Thunderbolt = 10 Gbit/s × 2 (2 channels) Thunderbolt 2 = 20 Gbit/s In Bytes per second, that is: USB ...


15

Traditional hard drives (7200 RPM) are much faster than the USB standard allows for. You can prove it by taking a decent hard drive and plugging it in natively, and testing it, and then testing it in a USB caddy. Since eSATA and Firewire (400/800) are both significantly quicker than USB, I'd be willing to bet they are reasonably close in speed to what sort ...


7

Wikipedia gives a quite comprehensive comparison: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA#Comparison_with_other_buses


7

Short answer: No. Slightly longer answer: Yes, but you'll essentially need another computer in a box to do it. USB (1.1, 2.0, and 3.0) are based on completely different specs than Firewire (400 and 800). Even the way they interact with the processor and memory is completely different. They are not wire-compatible, or even signal-compatible. In order to ...


6

Besides specifying the gender (male or female), you need to properly specify the type/style of USB connector (A or B). Presumably you are looking for a "female Standard A". I want to plug it into a IEEE 1394 port. I can think of two possible reasons for the scarcity of a suitable converter or adapter. Power conversion: USB supplies +5VDC regulated ...


5

The port labeled 1394 is a FireWire port. Therefore I don't think that you can directly connect a miniDisplayPort adapter on this port. If you have some adapter to connect your VGA to FireWire it could work...


5

Apple's Target Disk Mode does not boot the target computer (the broken Mac), so it doesn't matter what OS is running on that. But you'll need to press and hold down the T key while booting, and as the screen is broken you might have to guess when to do that. From Apple's (outdated) How to use and troubleshoot FireWire target disk mode: Make sure that ...


4

They are not interchangeable. It is like comparing ISA to PCI cards. While they do have same purpose, connectors are not same.


4

Historically 1394(Firewire) is generally used by more mac-centric hardware. The use of it on a mostly Windows platform is rare, 1394b(Firewire 800) dramatically more so. Of the two options, 1394a is much more commonly used, regardless of OS, than 1394b. I would guess that Dell defaulted to the "most compatible" solution rather than the "highest ...


4

The only other difference I found is that the Passport Studio is pre-formatted as HFS+ while the other two are formatted as NTFS. This, and the Firewire 800 port is why WD labels the Studio as "for Mac". But you can, of course, use any of the drives with either OS X or Windows, you just might have to reformat it. Edit: The Studio is also listed as Time ...


3

Yes, but you'll need to get ubCore since Microsoft didn't put FireWire networking in Windows 7.


3

This does indeed sound as if your Wi-Fi transceiver is interfering with your FireWire interface. However, I doubt that you’re getting noticeable crosstalk on your audio cable – this is digital audio, after all; I think it’s much more likely that the PCI cards themselves are improperly shielded, causing crosstalk between circuitry on the two cards. This ...


3

FireWire has features than cannot be easily emulated over a bus like USB. A USB-to-FireWire adapter, if somebody would manage to build one, would probably not be able to get 1394b speeds, and would likely cost much more than a complete new notebook with a built-in FireWire (or Thunderbolt) controller.


3

I believe this iMac has only one SATA port (plus the optical drive port). You could, however, install the SSD internally as the boot drive, and use an external HDD enclosure (ideally with FireWire 800) for the 1TB drive.


3

It is obviously possible to plug the wrong thing into a cable and fry whatever is on the other end. It seems like an unlikely scenario to me, but since according to Wikipedia, firewire is rated to "supply up to 45 watts of power per port at up to 30 volts". So if the wire were to have an internal short it could conceivably send the power down the wrong pin ...


3

I'm chiming in a bit late, but... the bus speeds that the various protocols are rated at are no good indication of the real speed you might expect. For example, USB has a lot of overhead (by design), and with most control chips I've come across USB 2.0 is actually no faster than Firewire 400 (no numbers at hand, hope you'll take it as anecdotal evidence from ...


3

It's hardly scientific, but my experiences with Firewire 400, 800 and USB 2 on various Intel Macs (laptops and iMacs) is that FW400 is noticeably faster than USB 2, and FW800 is getting-on for internal drive speeds. Daily, I copy around various 16-25Gb files (virtual machines) and would always pick FW800 (or 400) over USB2. For a while I was regularly ...


3

How is the performance when copying between two chained firewire drives? Unlike USB, Firewire was designed to run in a daisy-chained setup. Our performance with daisy-chained firewire devices has been great. Is it possible to run RAID on a setup like this? Yes, it is possible to setup a software RAID using the Disk Utility in Mac OS. But as ...


3

Intel Thunderbolt, as per the Wikipedia Sata link just above, is 10GB/s Also, none of these answers so far give any practical/useful information. Theoretical maximum and real-world speeds can vary wildly, and only some significant actual testing will give meaningful answers. So far, I haven't found many such tests. There's one at Crunchgear.com: ...


3

If you use an external HDD, small files doesn't matter. It'll work as a HDD. Only pendrives are slow if you copy small files. When it comes down to pure speed, Firewire wins. If you have an option to use that, go for it.


3

I had the same problem last year trying to connect a firewire camera to a laptop with no firewire. I tried searching for a firewire to USB converter (recognizing that such a device would be a protocol converter, not just physical adapter). Also looked for PCI to USB converter, thinking if there was such a thing, I might put a PCI firewire card in it. Note ...


2

Looks like someone once worked out a way to do this in Linux: Endpoint I haven't tried it; not sure what kind of shape it's in.


2

If your camera and PC both have a FireWire (a.k.a IEEE-1394, Sony i.Link) port, you should be set. Hook your camera up to your PC, load a tape, and fire up the free WinDV to capture the video. I don't have the time at the moment to get into particulars, but some basics: Capture is in real-time Capture is lossless compared to the DV tape Very high bitrate ...


2

Tape is actually a very stable storage medium. Keeping the original MiniDVs on a shelf, plus a spare player (preferably with a FireWire output) is a solid backup strategy. DVD-Rs suffer from bit rot even in the "archival" quality discs -- it's a technology issue. And hard drives, while fairly stable if they're not left connected to a machine but instead ...


2

I'd first suggest checking if anything appears in Disk Utility or if System Profiler recognizes anything being attached. Also, when you say other Macs are mounting the drive are they MacBook Pros as well and are they running the same versions of OS X? If you have AppleCare you can download TechTool Deluxe and see if it can fix the mount.


2

From the thread Windows 7 and Firewire problem Try changing your firewire driver. There are 3 drivers bundled in windows 7. You can try the following steps to fix our issue, This solved my initial problems with a Maxtor III OneTouch drive. Click the Start Button, type devmgmt.msc in the “Start Search” box and press Enter. Expand ...


2

If an acceptable solution to you is having the drive not spin down in the first place, you can set than in System Preferences -> Energy Saver. Then you won't have to worry about it spinning up and halting the system. I don't think you can change the behavior because it's not feasible for the system to guess when you'll need the drive available and when you ...


2

The much touted USB 3.0 will only give a maximum throughput that the storage medium on both ends will allow! Unless you have several SATA HDD linked up in RAID 0 or a fast SSD on both ends, high throughput cannot be achieved.Therefore, super-fast data transfer cannot be achieved without a lot of very expensive fancy hardware.


2

The second port is for daisy chaining multiple Firewire drives and won't work to double your throughput.



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