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7

Messing with the runlevel, through /etc/inittab or /etc/event.d (replacement for inittab) or the kernel boot options, won't help. The default runlevel on Ubuntu is 2 (check with the runlevel command), and there is no runlevel which is configured to be multi-user and text mode by default. Actually, I think your solution sudo update-rc.d -f gdm remove ...


6

You need to do this: mv /etc/rc2.d/S30gdm /etc/rc2.d/K70gdm See, /etc/rc2.d/README. There's README files in all the /etc/rc?.d directories, as well as /etc/init.d. Edit: The update-rc.d tool is not for editing these links. From the update-rc.d man page: Please note that this program was designed for use in package maintainer scripts and, accordingly,...


5

DISPLAY and AUTHORITY An X program needs two pieces of information in order to connect to an X display. (Note that wmctrl is an X program, even if it accesses other processes' windows rather than creating its own.) It needs the address of the display, which is typically :0 when you're logged in locally or :10, :11, etc. when you're logged in remotely (but ...


5

Maybe I'm missing something, but why delete and recreate the user at all, if all you want is to clean the home directory? Can't you just do a rsync -a --delete /etc/skel/ /home/student/ every time a user logs out? Maybe also kill all the user processes if any are left, but that's it. UPDATE: To change the owner of the files, you should simply run ...


5

GNOME stores your SSH key passphrases in GNOME Keyring, which (the login keyring) is unlocked with your login password by pam_gnome_keyring: #%PAM-1.0 auth ... auth ... auth optional pam_gnome_keyring.so session ... session ... session optional pam_gnome_keyring.so auto_start However, your ...


5

You can achieve this by modifying the daemon section of /etc/gdm/custom.conf: [daemon] AutomaticLoginEnable=true AutomaticLogin=USERNAME_HERE If you set AutomaticLogin=root, gdm will refuse to automatically log you in for security reasons. Use a regular user account instead.


4

It turns out I was barking up the wrong tree. The services were getting called, but my network wasn't being configured till I logged into GDM. This had a cascading effect on anything that expected a configured network. I filed a bug-report on Ubuntu Launchpad, and looking at some other bug reports helped me understand what was happening with my system. The ...


3

I found some info here, which suggests it is related with zlib - I can confirm that in my case it was zlib issue. However, I needed the zlib 1.2.5 compiled from source for other software, so I found these solutions: Upgrade Ubuntu (in 11.04 it does not occur, but it does not use gdm afaik?), but it is not really usefull advice Go to terminal (crtl+alt+f1), ...


3

The openend programs are killed because they lose their connection to the X-Server. For console programs started in xterm / gterm / gnome-terminal / konsole, etc., you may consider using screen so the program itself is not stopped. "daemon" processes started by the init-script or running in "background" after they were started from command line, are also ...


3

Trying to fix broken package depedencies by running apt-get -f install gdm might fix the situation, if the system is updated from a previous version (<= 9.10). As Ubuntu 10.04 uses Upstart (/etc/init) in place of InitV's scripts (/etc/init.d), you should check the contents of /etc/init/gdm.conf. It should list the appropriate runlevels when to start GDM ...


3

Just an answer here for anyone using Ubuntu 10.10+ Using rcconf or sysv-rc-conf to disable gdm will not stop GDM from running on startup. That is because 'upstart' (http://upstart.ubuntu.com/getting-started.html) is now being used to manage these services. To disable GDM absolutely, and prevent it from running ever, do this: sudo mv /etc/init/gdm.conf ~/...


3

If you don't really need a totally different X session but could go along with a nested one, try Xnest: Xnest is an X Window System server that shows its output in a window. In other words, Xnest opens a window that works like another screen in which the user can open windows, etc. once you're inside you can open a terminal, avoid the whole gdm issue ...


3

pklocalauthority is deprecated You need systemd with logind and polkit. Available actions pkaction (or /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/) You should look at /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/org.freedesktop.login1.policy Let's monitor system messages journalctl -f Then create file /etc/polkit-1/rules.d/60-noreboot_norestart.rules (in javascript), it will ...


3

All I can offer are some ideas that still need more work: Create a normal account with the right permissions where "/home/guest" is on a ramdisk so it gets refreshed on every boot Add a line that cleans "/home/guest" in the session script Bravely try to compile the Ubuntu gdm-guest-session package into Debian


2

Why not replace gdm with xdm or kdm?


2

Urgh, This has led me to discover a world of yuck that I wish I remained ignorant of. In short, it seems that GDM has been rewritten, and support for running >1 instance of GDM on the same machine has been taken out. The GDM list has several threads on the work being done to get GDM working again, as well as pointers to in-development sources that have ...


2

The Karmic build has mangled the init.d scripts. You should be able to stop gdm from running by modifying /etc/init/gdm.conf and adding 'runlevel [3] and' and changing the stop runlevel from 016 to 0216 like so: description "GNOME Display Manager" author "William Jon McCann <mccann@jhu.edu>" start on (runlevel [3] and filesystem ...


2

Hit Mod+Shift+Return to launch a terminal. Mod is likely left-alt or left-Win


2

The gnome package you're seeing is probably the meta package. This installs everything you may possibly need for a Gnome desktop, including browsers hence the dependencies. Is the problem that you don't want to install swfdec-mozilla and extensions for epiphany? The easiest thing to do to get Gnome back is install the gnome package anyway anyway, then try ...


2

All programms running in subshells of the xserver get terminated. Daemons are therefor not affected. VMWare server runs as daemon and will still be running when restarting gdm. You have to start the gui interface again though.


2

I finally found the answer to my question. The icon at the top of the login screen is called the greeter icon. It is located in /usr/share/icons/LoginIcons/apps/64/computer.svg. It can be installed with ubuntu-mono package. User icon can be set by copying an image into ~/.face file.


2

First, note that ConsoleKit's shutdown function considers "single user" and "multiple users" as two different situations – shutting down the system always requires administrator authentication if other users are logged in. All such actions are managed by PolicyKit. If you want to adjust the policies, you can do so as described in polkit(8) – /...


2

The solution was, as expected, trivial and obscure- With the vanilla install of CentOS 6.2 the X11 color definition file that is part of the xorg-x11-server-utils package (X.Org X11 X server utilities) is not resolved correctly by X11. For some apps this results in warning messages but others fail with unrelated errors. The solution was to add the ...


2

Just disable gdm.service and enable the service unit for your preferred display manager, so something like: systemctl disable gdm.service systemctl enable lxdm.service Would switch from gdm to lxdm.


1

update-icon-caches /usr/share/icons/LoginIcons/apps/64/ or wherever your icon is placed


1

I have the same problem on Centos6.3. I list my solution below which is inspired by misiak and [startx error when setting up X server on archlinux]. first by $ sudo ldd /usr/bin/Xorg | grep libz I get libz.so.1 => /usr/local/lib/libz.so.1 (0x00172000) /usr/local/lib/libz.so.1 link to /usr/local/lib/libz.so.1.2.7(may be my new install) I think ...


1

Once the system boots to the first screen with no login prompt: Hit Ctrl+Alt+F1 to go to the text mode login Log in to text mode with your credentials Change to the directory where the zlib source is located Run the command sudo make uninstall Now reboot using sudo reboot This worked for me when I had the same problem



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