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14

Looks like the --exclude option does this: --exclude ATOMS A space separated list of package names or slot atoms. Emerge won't install any ebuild or binary package that matches any of the given package atoms. So this did the job for me: emerge -auvD --exclude=media-sound/teamspeak-server-bin world


12

yeah, you've output (probably) binary to the console, and its faffed up the mapping. In situations like this, the command you want is reset. hit return (so you know you have a blank line), type in reset and hit return again. :-D


10

Well to change the led indicator on VT console you can use setleds. So if you're in a VT you can just type setleds and you'll get your current led status. If you don't want to enable numlock, just light it up you can type: setleds -L +num It comes trickier in X and this is the "simplest" way to try it. Please note that X is usually ran as root so ...


7

If you don't want to mask it you can use the --keep-going option. That makes the emerge reset its list and keep going, without the failed package in the list.


7

An alternative to the reset command is to output the ASCII SI (shift in) character, decimal value 15. This can be entered with Ctrl-O, and should work on any (even ancient) unix in case it laks the reset command. prompt> prompt>echo ^V^O


7

Don't include the category/package name in USE, it's just USE="json exif" emerge dev-lang/php But I'd suggest making that choice persistent, e.g. by adding dev-lang/php apache2 json exif to /etc/portage/package.use and then emerge dev-lang/php all modules are built into the php executable, gentoo doesn't use extension modules (.so), so this should ...


6

As webdestroya said, you'll need to find the old ebuild and put it in an overlay. The first part of that is easy enough, since the Portage tree is stored in a CVS repository which is browsable online (you can also check out a copy if you want, although to get just one ebuild that's unnecessary). Here's a direct link to the dev-util/subversion folder which ...


6

My guess is that you installed newer sources (maybe even built them), but you're still booting off of an older kernel.


6

2014 update: Latest udev versions do not create device nodes at all, and rely on the kernel's devtmpfs to do so. The old answer will therefore stop working if your distribution has a very recent udev. With devtmpfs, the only automated method might be a reboot. /dev is managed by udev on most Linux distros, so udevadm trigger should help. Restarting ...


5

First of all, you should distinguish two things: the program called init and an init process that linux runs after loading and doing basic startup - which is also called init by the kernel. The first one is a program, just as any other, who's task is to initiate system startup by running various other programs and control their closing. The most popular ...


5

In bash, alias sudo='sudo ' will cause bash to expand any aliases that come after sudo.


5

Just stop (as root) the process that respawns the X server: # /etc/init.d/xdm stop (yes, this is xdm even though you might be using something totally different)


5

I think you could create a Gentoo partition, mount it somewhere in the filesystem so you can access it while running Ubuntu, then chroot to it and do the compiling in the chrooted environment. That's basically what you do as part of the Gentoo installation anyway. (The installation disc is nothing but a minimal Gentoo LiveCD which you use to set up a working ...


5

Make sure you own the tty: # ls -l $(tty) crw--w----. 1 foo tty 136, 0 MarĀ  1 16:53 /dev/pts/0 # chown root $(tty) Set GPG_TTY: # export GPG_TTY=$(tty) gpg/pinentry should work after these steps.


5

The USB device should appear under /sys/bus/usb/devices as several entries beginning with 7-6 or something similar. Where the driver link within the directories point will be the name of the module bound to the device.


5

Install ifplugd.


5

How to allow normal users to shutdown/reboot in gentoo: If you get any of these kinds of errors: shutdown: you must be root to do that! poweroff: must be superuser. reboot: must be superuser. halt: must be superuser. One way to grant users access to superuser only commands to use the sudo command: Login as root: su - Emerge Sudo: emerge ...


4

This seems to be a bug in Chromium with the Helvetica font. It is discussed here: https://forums-web1.gentoo.org/viewtopic-t-984870.html?sid=d8fa5b8fc9ae0c83520d1769dc366d58 From that thread, this solution fixed it for me: make the following files in some empty directory go to chrome://extensions check the developer mode box Load unpacked extension ...


4

I am running Ubuntu 12.04 and had the same problem. After removing all 70-something configs from /etc/fonts/conf.d and linking 70-no-bitmaps.conf -> ../conf.avail/70-no-bitmaps.conf and checking, that the selectfont element in the xml was not commented out and looked like this my fonts render nicely again. <?xml version="1.0"?> <!DOCTYPE ...


4

It's a rather easy process. Under Ubuntu, system themes are stored in /usr/share/themes and icons in /usr/share/icons. Simply copy your desired theme and files to the same locations in your Gentoo install and select them from Gnome's appearance manager. X11 cursor sets are stored inside /usr/share/icons theme packages, so those will be copied as well. Edit: ...


4

You might be interested in Gentoo Prefix. Usually, Gentoo's Portage installs in the root of the filesystem hierarchy, '/'. On systems other than Gentoo Linux, this usually results in problems, due to conflicts of software packages, unless the OS is adapted like Gentoo/FreeBSD. Instead, Gentoo Prefix installs with an offset, allowing to ...


4

I've run Gentoo (fairly recently) on a Pentium 233MHz with only 64MB of RAM. Nothing was fast, and it was vital that there was some swap space since nearly every compile would use up all of the system's memory, but it did work. I can't recommend it, but I would say Gentoo will run on just about any machine. A much better way to do this would likely be to ...


4

No, not really. You can start the kernel with the parameters init=/bin/bash for a very minimal system.


3

You can do that using AutoHotkey. Check this thread if you want to learn about the codes you need to use. After reading that thread and the documentation on AutoHotkey you can do those things. Also it works with USB and Wireless keyboards too. You can use it with Wine on Gentoo.


3

This is what you need to read, an intro to portage, the package manager in Gentoo. To update everything (including dependencies and changes to use flags), then emerge -avDuN world To update a single package (again paying attention to dependencies etc): emerge -avDuN <package-name> A basic update, without checking for dependency updates would be ...


3

For anyone that wants to know, the problem was linux was trying to mount root before all the USB devices were detected. rootdelay=12 fixed this.


3

check Gmail - blinks LEDs when e-mails received and says the number of emails #!/bin/bash echo "Checking for new email"; mails="$(wget --secure-protocol=TLSv1 --timeout=3 -t 1 -q -O - \ https://name1:password1@mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom \ --no-check-certificate | grep 'fullcount' \ | sed -e 's/.*<fullcount>//;s/<\/fullcount>.*//' ...


3

A workaround without loosing VA would be to use the 12.6 AMD proprietary driver or prior. The tearing regression seems to start with 12.8. http://support.amd.com/us/gpudownload/linux/previous/Pages/radeon_linux.aspx Just enable execution permissions, run the script with root privileges and build a package and install it.


3

One way to do this should be to override the default portage rsync options excluding the deletion related options. The default options are currently hardcoded in /usr/lib/portage/pym/_emerge/actions.py from line 2039 at my place. Excluding "--force" and "--delete" you would add PORTAGE_RSYNC_OPTS="--recursive --links --safe-links --perms --times ...


3

And.. surprisingly enough (or unsurprisingly enough), gentoo supports building packages and creating a repository, using emerge, and its in the gentoo handbook (its the PPC version, but eh, the commands should be the same, and easy to check). It also says how to set up a repository. I'd note though, you'd lose the advantage of being able to optimise your ...



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