Hot answers tagged

20

For Google you should favorite www.google.com/ncr. This will always bring you to the main US search page. The ncr stands for "no country redirect". Setting that as your homepage would be a good start. As previously pointed out, websites are using geolocation based on your IP, which is a best guess attempt. Specific websites might let you set a location ...


19

Short answer: You are seeing the request to Skyhook Wireless because they have the geographic database that Apple uses for Core Location in the operating system. Longer answer: Skyhook Wireless is the company with the geographic database about WiFi access points that is used for the new location services (Core Location) in OS X Snow Leopard. Core ...


13

They are most likely looking up your IP address and using that to redirect you. I just flat out wouldn't use Bing. I would give TOR a try, but you might suffer from the same problem with respect to you don't know where you're going to end up IP address wise. You could be tunneling out of Germany or the States. Look into paid proxies or use an SSH tunnel ...


11

You can never be sure when it comes to traceroute results. But there is hope for your special case. The contract says the servers are in the EU. There is a test you can execute which, if successful, would give you 100% guarantee that they are lying. (if unsuccessful, they might be telling the truth, or they might be lying) The idea is to use something like ...


10

Use an internet proxy based in the US.


10

When Google made pictures for "Street View" they also collected data about available wireless networks. Cellphones with the Android operating systems can use this data to determine their location via "Assisted GPS" (faster than traditional standalone GPS) and they also transmit information about available wireless networks back to Google. Although you have ...


10

Click the Chrome menu Chrome menu on the browser toolbar. Select Settings. Click Show advanced settings. In the "Privacy" section, click Content settings. In the dialog that appears, scroll down to the "Location" section. Click Manage exceptions. Source: http://support.google.com/chrome/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=142065 Also be sure to check all ...


8

Google Latitude uses a proprietary Google service that operates on the exact same principal as the more popular Skyhook Wireless system. The software takes readings from your wifi adapter, and compares these to a database of known wireless networks and their locations, allowing for the triangulation of your position based on signal strengths. This allows the ...


8

There's a service providing this: ipinfo.io. You can invoke it using curl. Example: curl ipinfo.io Result: { "ip": "...", "hostname": "...", "city": "...", "region": "...", "country": "...", "loc": "...,...", "org": "..." } A specific IP's info can also be requested: curl ipinfo.io/216.58.194.46: { "ip": "216.58.194.46", "hostname": ...


7

It's mostly up to the browser to implement. One example, which is used on the iPhone & iPod touch to help determine location, is SkyHook Wireless. From the Maps help page: The feature is available in browsers that support the new Geolocation feature. This feature may be built in to the browser itself, or can be provided by the Gears browser ...


7

IP addresses aren't assigned to individual subscribers, but rather to an ISP or large organization. The ISP takes an IP address from the range of addresses it has been assigned and then gives one (or more) to each of their subscribers. Usually, the subscribers' addresses don't follow any set pattern and there's no guarantee that a particular IP address ...


7

Windows will provide apps with your location if you allow it. For normal laptops and desktop computers this location will be determined by seeing what wireless networks are nearby and your IP-address. Your IP-address will tell roughly where you are, and many companies have huge databases of WiFi networks with their positions that can be used. For mobile ...


7

You can probably just change your setting by clicking the site icon:


6

It may be a bit obvious, but have you tried using a proxy? If it is your browser configuration, I recommend getting a firefox extension called User Agent Switcher. It lets you control the exact browser/OS info that gets sent to websites, which if you bought Windows there, it may be advertising that your from Brazil.


6

whether they also store a huge database of wireless AP points, Well, that's one way of how it works, according to their blog: Google Maps asks your web browser for your location. Typically, your browser uses information about the Wi-Fi access points around you to estimate your location. If no Wi-Fi access points are in range, or your computer ...


6

I've been massively frustrated with the language changing across Google services. Pages would appear in Swedish regardless of my Google profile or browser settings. I just found that setting the language in Google Search Settings magically seems to work as kind of a master switch for other Google services as well (how's that for consistency) - at least with ...


6

Probably the IP address belongs to the airport (from which your internet access is coming, since there's no cell signal at the plane's altitude) or to a nearby tower (which might as well be installed in the airport), and the internet connection is just relayed to the aircraft. Doing some searching around, I found this: How does Wi-Fi work on airplanes?, ...


6

In order to get this working on a laptop, you'll need to have support "throughout the stack" as follows: Driver support - The laptop must have hardware drivers that can recognize the GPS device and interface with it, whether it's over USB or some other protocol. The drivers are usually implemented in the kernel, but if you know for a fact that you have ...


5

Unlocator provides (at least) their own name server, which they say returns the normal results for "all other" services, but modifies those for supported services (like Netflix, Discovery Channel, ...). There are two basic categories of location blocking: Blocking based on different IP addresses returned by name servers based on the network you're in. ...


4

If you have the money getting a private proxy service is pretty cheap and easy. Look around for US based proxy services that will filter your traffic through it's US servers and back out into the web. That way all websites will think your traffic is originating in the US.


4

I've also been looking for this kind of program. The best I've found is Jarvis. It is still in early stages of development but looks hopeful.


4

The Gears API page describes how it works. The Geolocation API provides the best estimate of the user's position using a number of sources (called location providers). These providers may be onboard (GPS for example) or server-based (a network location provider). The getCurrentPosition and watchPosition methods support an optional parameter of type ...


4

Try clicking the "no country redirection" link Go to Google.com on the main Google search page. My link should also do the same thing and may immediately fix your problem. This is designed to be a toggle between the generic .com and local country-based page. Some more information on this problem can be found here.


4

Websites don't actually know where you are. Some make a best guess based on information such as IP address or language settings. The only way they can know for sure is if you tell them explicitly. If you have a Google account you can do this by going to the account preferences and locating 'edit your personal info'. There you should find an option to set ...


4

With a little time delay from your question but... you can set the geolocation provider modifying the file "Local State" inside the Chrome installation dir User Data/ There is the geolocation tag and you can set the URL and the token you will use.


4

You need a VPN/Proxy access in the US ;-)


4

This is an HTTP-based service where router MAC addresses are mapped to approximate GPS coordinates from other data sources. That's a weird statement, IMO. MAC addresses are unique hardware identifiers; they are not location-based. I could take a router anywhere and plug it in and get on the Internet. In IPv4, MAC addresses are only sent in packets ...


4

Windows 7 needs a sensor installed to provide the services (Google) with information pertinent to the service. One such sensor is Geosense which will provide the behavior you are looking for. The sensor currently supports Google Location Services via IP/WiFi. The framework exists within Windows 7 but it still requires 3rd party implementations which will ...


4

[Please upvote/accept @jcrawfordor's answer, but I wanted to add some information and the comment box character limit was too small, so I decided put this as an Answer instead.] Please note the web browser Geolocation API. You probably forgot that the first time you visited Google Latitude, you gave your browser permission to let Google Latitude access your ...


4

In theory, there is, based on finding the network latency between the IP address and a large number of routers with known locations. See this paper. I'm not aware of any commercial implementations, and it would be a lot of work to implement for yourself.



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