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8

You might have to set the boot device, but generally no, you don't have to set anything up. I'd still open it up and LOOK at the settings, just to see what's available for changing later.


8

Some games can use a dedicated card for PhysX simulation. Other than that, I can't come up with anything that the second card could be used for (in terms of enhancing performance). The difference between x1, x2, x4, x8 and x16 PCIe is the maximum throughput of the bus (how much data can pass between the card and the rest of the system in a given time). ...


5

Your card will work fine. The amount of allocated RAM is how much on-motherboard RAM you can "shift" to use by the Onboard Graphics processor. The onboard graphics does not have its own RAM, and must use the RAM inserted in the motherboard. Since you will be using a dedicated graphics card, with its own RAM, this allocation of RAM does not apply to you. ...


4

UEFI doesn't guarantee any kind of graphical interface. It provides the ability for companies like Gigabyte to create and design their own graphical BIOS. This is explained fairly well in the Wikipedia article for UEFI. So now I wanted to ask you if somebody knows how to enable/get into this interface? Do I have to enable UEFI somewhere UEFI isn't ...


4

The motherboard support CrossFire, which is a brand name for SLI between 2 ATI (AMD) videocards. Your current videocard is an NVidia one, and indeed doesn't support CrossFire. As for the slot sizes, PCI-e is intentionally designed to allow imperfect combinations. For instance, as a rule a 16x videocard will still work (with lower performance) in a 4x slot. ...


4

If any changes have been made to the disk that was dropped to create a new array, you'll find out how good your backups are because that's almost the only way to get your data back. I'll be fair... If only a little writing to the second missing disk has occurred, you could probably send the disks to a data recovery expert and get a solid fraction of the ...


4

I'm a heavy overclocker with a watercooled machine that was built myself, so I may be able to help. :) First, Did you try resetting to failsafe settings to determine if it's the overclocking causing the issue? If not; How many video cards do you have? What kind? What voltages did you use? What multiplier?


4

Found 2 references to it on Asus and Gigabyte MB and a driver, sounding like payware loaded with a motherboard driver. http://www.runscanner.net/lib/BCU.exe.html http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/268725-30-what-gigabyte-browser-configuration-utility Seems to be harmless but I would remove the payware myself, Gigabyte gets paid to incorporate it into a ...


4

That mainboard only has SATA 2 controllers, but you can you a SATA3 drive on a SATA2 interface. You just won't get the 6Gb/s. :)


4

Your motherboard presumably keeps standby power on them (probably it supports "Wake on USB" functionality). There may be a BIOS option, as I'm not familiar with this exact board, but such an option is exceedingly rare on non-laptops (EDIT: by which I mean, even if you disable Wake on USB, the board will still power the devices). As a workaround to ...


4

SATA3 Hard Drives are backwards compatible with SATA2 so you could get a SATA3 Drive and use it on a SATA2 controller. However, you need to realize the speed differences of SATA2 and SATA3 and how that compares to speed of Hard Drives. SATA2 can transfer data at 300MBps max while SATA3 can transfer at 600MBps max. However, your typical consumer hard drive ...


3

According to Wikipedia Hypermemory is an ATI technology, much akin to Nvidias Turbocache. And from what I can tell they were both limited to use on the absolute bargain cards so that they saved money on memory by using system RAM. I would expect your 9800GT to have either 512MB or 1024MB of onboard RAM and would not expect it to be using TurboCache (or ...


3

I would make sure you are running the newest BIOS for your motherboard. Check the bios version or revision on boot. Go ahead and go to the manufactor website and check for any updates to that board. Otherwise, everything you set in the bios is up to you. You do not have to set anything and just use the defaults if you want. I would NOT however, change ...


3

The symptoms you describe suggest a RAM or motherboard problem. I would try running Memtest86+ first, to see if the RAM has gone bad. If the RAM comes back clean, or if the computer hangs during the test, your motherboard has probably developed an issue. If you're having power fluctuation issues, you might want to take a look at an uninterruptable power ...


3

You should use the x16 slot for the best possible video performance. On this particular motherboard, there are two slots that will physically hold an x16 graphics card, but the second slot, labeled PCIEX4, only runs at x4 (1/4 of the possible speed of the x16 slot). In this particular case, my first suspicion is a defective motherboard. You can try updating ...


3

With older systems, the 'onboard' graphics was a distinct chip on the motherboard. With modern intel systems, from sandy bridge onwards, its part of the CPU. The chipset that the video adaptor was part of has been merged into the CPU proper. The mainstream processors the z97 is designed for have GPUs built in. The server chips do not, and the onboard ...


2

Updating your BIOS shouldn't mess up your card like that. Go to device manager and find your graphics card. Then uninstall it. Reboot your computer, check device manager that your card is recognized. If that doesn't work, then open up Q-Flash and flash your BIOS back to the other version that you were on.


2

True, you can update BIOS for gain access to certain CPU, but that CPU is not listed on the supported CPU's for that motherboard. So, is unknown or surely you will not use that CPU on that motherboard. Look it for yourself: http://www.gigabyte.com/support-downloads/cpu-support-popup.aspx?pid=3875 Even if you update, you only gain support for the upper ...


2

I'm pretty sure that spec relates to the amount of memory that can be allocated for Intel HD Graphics.


2

A quick google on DeviceVM Inc suggests that it is a company called Spashtop that changed their name from DeviceVM to Spashtop See http://www.splashtop.com/press/devicevm-inc-officially-becomes-splashtop-inc It looks like they do some remote desktop stuff that lets you see your PC on your iPad, which would not suprise me if this is what is running, and ...


2

Try CPU-Z, it detects the make and model of motherboards. SiSoft Sandra also will detect motherboard make and model. I have used both in the past and they work well. Also, be aware some computer manufacturers, use custom motherboards from other manufacturers. Just because it has Gigabyte on the motherboard, does not mean that Gigabyte will support it, or ...


2

Couple things you can try: 1) Turn off the system, put your hand flat on the keyboard, effectively holding down a bunch of keys, and turn it on. You will hopefully get a 'key stuck' POST warning which may help get you into the BIOS. 2) Take out the CMOS battery for a while to reset the BIOS to defaults. This will often cause the system to stop at the ...


2

I had this problem as well. This is how is solved it: I was using a HP Pavillion notebook with AMD Radeon GPU. PROBS: dxdiag showed display was working OK with all direct X Features enabled, BUT graphics adpter name was Microsoft Basic Display Adapter and only showed 256 MB graphics memory instead of the 2GB in my Radeon Graphics adapter. Device Manager ...


2

What model ASROCK board? Many people are complaining of artifacting and boot problems with the GV-N680OC-4GD on PCI-E 3.0 boards, whereas the card works fine on PCI-E 2.0. Also, There are known issues with Geforce 600 series cards on the x79 chipset due to the incomplete implementation of PCI-E 3.0 on x79. Your system Bios (F7) is from 2011. Consider ...


2

The following is based on the fact that you've stated you already tried a different PSU with the same results. If you have not, follow the below steps before replacing it. Keep the MB power cord and the CPU power cord plugged in (along with the cpu in its socket). Make sure nothing else is plugged into the power supply other than the two cords mentioned. ...


2

The case fans have nothing to do with cooling the CPU. That's a job for the CPU fan. The case fans merely circulate air by introducing fresh outside air, and exhausting stale, hot air. Thus, what you're experiencing seems right. The CPU fan increases speed to keep CPU cool, but the system temperature (not CPU temperature) is not high enough to trigger ...


2

I set up recently my computer with a USB keyboard. When I had to mess with the BIOS I couldn't use it until I enabled USB keyboard compability for DOS (undocumented feature), so I needed a PS/2 keyboard to do that. So I think that this is a good idea to change that flag. And you should check whether the SATA ports are in IDE compatibility or in AHCI mode. I ...


2

You can format a bootable floppy or a bootable CD or a bootable USB key, and copy the autoexec.bat and other files to the root directory there. Then boot off that medium. Windows can format the floppy for you. Nero can make a bootable CD-R for you. There are various utilities around the Internet to do the USB key.


2

In my experience, this is a faulty HDD - the data reads are succeeding after several tries which is why you aren't getting errors. I would try another HDD drive - or try that drive in another machine - to try and determine if it is faulty or not. I wouldn't trust it with data you need until you've established for sure that it is not the drive.



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