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61

It goes back quite some time, and is detailed here. It looks like you can blame IBM, if anybody. Having thought about it some more, I would blame the Americans as a whole, for their blatant disregard for the Système international d'unités :P


25

All computing was low-level at the beginning. And at low level programming the number "1000" is totally useless and they needed prefixes for larger amounts so they reused the SI ones. Everyone knew it in the field, there was no confusion. It served well for 30 years or who knows. It's not because they were Americans so they needed to break SI at all costs. ...


16

Memory is closely tied to the CPU, so making their size a power of two means that multiple modules can be packed requiring a minimum of logic in order to switch between them; only a few bits from the end need to be checked (since the binary representation of the size is 1000...0000 regardless of its size) instead of many more bits were it not a power of two. ...


8

It is correct and makes sense for technical people to use 1024 = 1K in many cases. For end users it is normally better to say 1000 = 1k because everybody is used to the 10-based number system. The problem is where to draw the line. Sometimes marketing or advertising people do not really succeed in the "translation" or in adapting technical data and ...


8

You might have to set the boot device, but generally no, you don't have to set anything up. I'd still open it up and LOOK at the settings, just to see what's available for changing later.


8

Some games can use a dedicated card for PhysX simulation. Other than that, I can't come up with anything that the second card could be used for (in terms of enhancing performance). The difference between x1, x2, x4, x8 and x16 PCIe is the maximum throughput of the bus (how much data can pass between the card and the rest of the system in a given time). ...


7

Simply speaking, computers work in 1s and 0s. That's what binary is. The computer uses this system to address memory. In a simple (read "ancient") system, a certain number of processor lines or memory address unit lines are dedicated to selecting the address of a particular location in memory. Since those lines can only carry values of "high" or "low" each ...


6

Your first actions should be to find the bad stick(s) as doing anything further until the stick(s) are removed would be counterproductive until the ram runs error free. I would suggest pulling all sticks and then test each individualy with what you used (Memtest86+) and get the probelm stick(s) out of the picture and then address the 32 bit OS limitations. ...


5

Your card will work fine. The amount of allocated RAM is how much on-motherboard RAM you can "shift" to use by the Onboard Graphics processor. The onboard graphics does not have its own RAM, and must use the RAM inserted in the motherboard. Since you will be using a dedicated graphics card, with its own RAM, this allocation of RAM does not apply to you. ...


5

The binary system is known as base 2 because there are two possible values: 0 and 1 (on and off, high and low, 5V and 0V), compared to the normal natural number system known as base 10 (0-9). Hard drive manufacturers want their capacity to appear higher, so a 1GB drive (base 10, 1 billion bytes, 109) is really only 0.9313GiB (base 2, 2something) (this is ...


4

Found 2 references to it on Asus and Gigabyte MB and a driver, sounding like payware loaded with a motherboard driver. http://www.runscanner.net/lib/BCU.exe.html http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/268725-30-what-gigabyte-browser-configuration-utility Seems to be harmless but I would remove the payware myself, Gigabyte gets paid to incorporate it into a ...


4

If any changes have been made to the disk that was dropped to create a new array, you'll find out how good your backups are because that's almost the only way to get your data back. I'll be fair... If only a little writing to the second missing disk has occurred, you could probably send the disks to a data recovery expert and get a solid fraction of the ...


4

If you're using Readyboost on a Studio 15, there seriously is no point in checking out Per-GB costs because your pagefile won't be that big (maybe 3 or 4 GB at its peak if you're doing 3D animation while playing Halo at the same time with Firefox open in the background just in case), so you only need to consider 4GB cards anyway. And 4GB cards are about $14 ...


4

I'm a heavy overclocker with a watercooled machine that was built myself, so I may be able to help. :) First, Did you try resetting to failsafe settings to determine if it's the overclocking causing the issue? If not; How many video cards do you have? What kind? What voltages did you use? What multiplier?


4

The motherboard support CrossFire, which is a brand name for SLI between 2 ATI (AMD) videocards. Your current videocard is an NVidia one, and indeed doesn't support CrossFire. As for the slot sizes, PCI-e is intentionally designed to allow imperfect combinations. For instance, as a rule a 16x videocard will still work (with lower performance) in a 4x slot. ...


4

That mainboard only has SATA 2 controllers, but you can you a SATA3 drive on a SATA2 interface. You just won't get the 6Gb/s. :)


4

Your motherboard presumably keeps standby power on them (probably it supports "Wake on USB" functionality). There may be a BIOS option, as I'm not familiar with this exact board, but such an option is exceedingly rare on non-laptops (EDIT: by which I mean, even if you disable Wake on USB, the board will still power the devices). As a workaround to ...


4

SATA3 Hard Drives are backwards compatible with SATA2 so you could get a SATA3 Drive and use it on a SATA2 controller. However, you need to realize the speed differences of SATA2 and SATA3 and how that compares to speed of Hard Drives. SATA2 can transfer data at 300MBps max while SATA3 can transfer at 600MBps max. However, your typical consumer hard drive ...


4

The module shown in your list is a 4GB module, if you have 4 of those modules then you only have 16GB. What you have bought is two 8GB dual-channel kits. The kit means that it will provide a total of 8GB. From Corsair Product Description High-performance 8GB Vengeance Dual Channel Kit, 1600MHz, 9-9-9-24, 1.5V Key Features Package Contents ...


4

The amount of memory in your system depends on several things. First, the processor has to be able to address 64-bit memory space. Second, the chipset on your motherboard has to be 64-bit AND be designed to support 4GB or more as well. Third, your Operating System has to be 64-bit OR utilize PAE to address more than 4GB of memory (Windows 2003 server 32-bit ...


4

UEFI doesn't guarantee any kind of graphical interface. It provides the ability for companies like Gigabyte to create and design their own graphical BIOS. This is explained fairly well in the Wikipedia article for UEFI. So now I wanted to ask you if somebody knows how to enable/get into this interface? Do I have to enable UEFI somewhere UEFI isn't ...


3

You should use the x16 slot for the best possible video performance. On this particular motherboard, there are two slots that will physically hold an x16 graphics card, but the second slot, labeled PCIEX4, only runs at x4 (1/4 of the possible speed of the x16 slot). In this particular case, my first suspicion is a defective motherboard. You can try updating ...


3

The symptoms you describe suggest a RAM or motherboard problem. I would try running Memtest86+ first, to see if the RAM has gone bad. If the RAM comes back clean, or if the computer hangs during the test, your motherboard has probably developed an issue. If you're having power fluctuation issues, you might want to take a look at an uninterruptable power ...


3

According to Wikipedia Hypermemory is an ATI technology, much akin to Nvidias Turbocache. And from what I can tell they were both limited to use on the absolute bargain cards so that they saved money on memory by using system RAM. I would expect your 9800GT to have either 512MB or 1024MB of onboard RAM and would not expect it to be using TurboCache (or ...


3

I would make sure you are running the newest BIOS for your motherboard. Check the bios version or revision on boot. Go ahead and go to the manufactor website and check for any updates to that board. Otherwise, everything you set in the bios is up to you. You do not have to set anything and just use the defaults if you want. I would NOT however, change ...


2

I set up recently my computer with a USB keyboard. When I had to mess with the BIOS I couldn't use it until I enabled USB keyboard compability for DOS (undocumented feature), so I needed a PS/2 keyboard to do that. So I think that this is a good idea to change that flag. And you should check whether the SATA ports are in IDE compatibility or in AHCI mode. I ...


2

You can format a bootable floppy or a bootable CD or a bootable USB key, and copy the autoexec.bat and other files to the root directory there. Then boot off that medium. Windows can format the floppy for you. Nero can make a bootable CD-R for you. There are various utilities around the Internet to do the USB key.


2

In my experience, this is a faulty HDD - the data reads are succeeding after several tries which is why you aren't getting errors. I would try another HDD drive - or try that drive in another machine - to try and determine if it is faulty or not. I wouldn't trust it with data you need until you've established for sure that it is not the drive.


2

A quick google on DeviceVM Inc suggests that it is a company called Spashtop that changed their name from DeviceVM to Spashtop See http://www.splashtop.com/press/devicevm-inc-officially-becomes-splashtop-inc It looks like they do some remote desktop stuff that lets you see your PC on your iPad, which would not suprise me if this is what is running, and ...


2

Blame semiconductor manufacturers (they provide us with binary hardware only)[1] Better yet: blame logic itself (binary logic is just the most elementary logic). Better yet: who shall we blame for the wretched decimal system? It has far more flaws than the binary system. It was based cough on the average number of fingers in the human species cough ...



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