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GnuPG 2.1 (and upwards) switched to a new keyring format with better performance. For newly generated keyrings, the keys are stored in the pubring.kbx file. Another change was merging public and private keyrings, that's why there is no additional secring.kbx. With other words: the files changed, but you're not missing anything.


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You cannot really only move the private keys, it would be easier moving the whole GnuPG home directory, which is usually the hidden folder ~/.gnupg (in Windows, somewhere deep in the hidden AppData folder). If you move this folder to the USB drive, either use the GnuPG option --homedir to make GnuPG use the directory on the USB drive, or set the environment ...


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Copy your .gnupg directory to your USB drive. Then use a secure wipe program to wipe out the old .gnupg directory; which program to use depends on your OS. Don't rely just on deleting the file as this leaves intact most of the data. Then run GPG using the command-line option --homedir <newdir>, where newdir is the GPG directory on your USB disk.


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Advantages of using Subkeys The better-use-subkeys-mentality might look like overengineering, but has some strong arguments. The necessity when used with signing-only algorithms like DSA is obvious (and not debated). The ability of putting the private primary key offline (and reducing risk of losing it) and rotating keys being easier might look very ...


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Some Theory: Hybrid Cryptography Systems OpenPGP uses a hybrid cryptography approach: symmetric encryption with the so-called "session key" for encrypting the message itself, and then encrypting the session key with public/private key cryptography, once for each recipient. This is on one hand a performance requirement (public/private key cryptography is ...


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Fedora 22 and 23 already ship GnuPG 2.1, which merged the private keyring into the public keyring. Enigmail interfaces GnuPG 2, so keys created with Enigmail and GnuPG 2.1 are stored in the public keyring file. Use gpg2 instead of gpg if you can; otherwise you'll have to export the secret keys from gpg2 and import it to GnuPG 1 again: gpg2 ...


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Please use gpg --print-md sha1 filename to get the same output format as sha1sum use gpg --print-md sha1 filename | sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/\n/ /g' | sed -r 's/([A-F0-9]{4})(\ *|\n)/\L\1/g'|sed -r 's/(.*):\ (.*)/\2\ \ \1/g' should be BSD sed compatible. Also works for sha256 and sha512


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While Linux distributions often bring tools dedicated to calculate given hashsums like sha1sum and sha256sum, OS X does not have those. But OpenSSL is available and readily installed, and can be used for calculating hash sums, similarly to how sha1sum is used: openssl sha1 apache-tomcat-9.0.0.M1-src.tar


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I would suspect it'd be in whatever [working] directory you're running the command from if you're not explicitly telling the --output switch to place it elsewhere. Otherwise, you might check the C:\Program Files (x86)\GNU\GnuPG\pub directory just in case for some reason it's going there. If that doesn't turn up anything run the command with the output ...


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When using --output without an absolute path, the path starts at the current working directory (like you did, just providing a file name), the file should have been stored in the working directory. Without --output, the revocation certificate would have been printed to the command line. Now you're not supposed to write to the C:\Program Files ...



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