Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

One reason might be that the contents contain the ASCII character 4, which is equivalent to ctrl-d ("EOT end of transmission"); followed by any additional input: this is the same as you pasting the encrypted data, pressing ctrl-d and typing some final garbage. You could use a hex editor to analyze the input. If you find a character (byte) 04, then you ...


1

We have to import the keys before checking the signature. $ gpg --import gpg-signers.pem gpg: key 4F25E3B6: public key "Werner Koch (dist sig)" imported $ gpg --verify libassuan-2.2.0.tar.bz2.sig libassuan-2.2.0.tar.bz2 gpg: Signature made Thu 11 Dec 2014 21:13:07 JST using RSA key ID 4F25E3B6 gpg: Good signature from "Werner Koch (dist sig)" If we don't ...


0

OpenSSH's new Unix Domain Socket Forwarding can do this directly starting with version 6.7. You should be able to something like: ssh -R /home/bminton/.gnupg/S.gpg-agent:/home/bminton/.gnupg/S-gpg-agent -o "StreamLocalBindUnlink=yes" -l bminton 192.168.1.9


0

In case people (like me) get confused, there was some additional clarification provided in "How to generate the revocation certificate after being made a revoker with GnuPG". The --edit-key/addrevoker is used to grant permission for someone else to generate the revocation certificate; that someone else uses --desig-revoke to actually generate the ...


1

Do not use --gen-revoke, but --desig-revoke instead. From man gpg: --desig-revoke name Generate a designated revocation certificate for a key. This allows a user (with the permission of the keyholder) to revoke someone else's key. GnuPG will ask you whether you want to create a revocation certificate for this other key, for example revoking ...


2

You're confusing two different digital certificate systems. Certificates are not interchangeable between the two systems. OpenPGP OpenPGP provides a non-hierarchical trust system, which does not require central certificate authorities. It is the more powerful, but also more complex system. Most mail clients do not support it out of the box, and require ...


0

Outlook does NOT use normal (pgp) private keys for signing emails. It uses SSL style certificates and their associated private keys (signed by a trusted third party) to do the work. Outlook needs this certificate to be in pkcs12 format. (the Linux "file" command can confirm this) This has the advantage/disadvantage that you don't get a 'web of trust' to ...


0

Not 100% sure, but if the certificate works elsewhere this could be a simple case of DOS line ending formatting verus Linux line ending formatting mucking up the works in Outlook 2010. I would recommend installing the unix2dos utility on CentOS like this: sudo yum install unix2dos And then from the command line in CentOS running this unix2dos command ...


3

While @Jens Erat's answer was rather comprehensive, I did research into breaking RSA (the algorithm behind OpenPGP), so I wanted to opine: I'll break with the norm and give the TL;DR first: It is impossible for you to break that key. If we are looking at this realistically, there is no way for you to factor a 1024-bit integer. Your best possible bet would ...


14

First, I'm assuming you're speaking of RSA 1024 bit encryption. Generally, the topic is far too complicated for providing a simple number. tl;dr: Cracking an OpenPGP encrypted message on a single CPU is not feasible, and probably takes years even with large computing clusters. Yet unknown (to the public) mathematical flaws could change this by order of ...


0

Setting up individual passphrases for subkeys is not possible with GnuPG. But there's a workaround, which even looks like good practice idea in this case: Export the subkey of choice (in the example, the subkey has ID 0xDEADBEEF). Don't forget the exclamation mark, it makes sure GnuPG actually works with the subkey itself and not with the primary key it ...


1

GPG stores public and private keys in different places. You output mentions : /home/kshitiz/.gnupg/pubring.gpg which holds the "public" key (pubring) If you want to list private keys you have to use the --list-secret-keys switch. As per why the key 8F64D7E0 does not get deleted, it's because you asked to destroy the private key only. Since deleting a ...


1

shred sounds like your weapon of choice, for securely deleting files, but see below for filesystem limitations. And if you're using the terminal, some bash/sh scripting might be useful. If you want to use an error-checking one line? Like this to move a file if it's encrypted correctly, and print a message if it wasn't? gpg --encrypt <options> "$file" ...


2

The private key for your email is needed for signing the message (authenticity of the sender), so the receiver can check if the message is really from you. So disable signing the message, then the private key is not needed. In Enigmail this can be done by clicking the icons on the lower right bottom of the compose-window, or in the Enigmail-menu in the menu ...


0

Michael's '660' answer didn't do it for me. The only way I was able to have enough permissions without getting an "unsafe permissions" warning was to do 700. No more, no less. Here are my commands (Ubuntu flavor) sudo -i cd /var/www/.gnupg chown -R www-data:www-data . chmod -R 700 . Also, in my case, the problem was that gnupg_addencryptkey is meant to ...


0

I'd suspect you're actually getting hard wrapping instead of truncation. There should be a line-wrapping option in your GPG tool, which might do the trick... The general recommendation seems to be to set line wrapping to 70 chars as some email systems start wrapping around 72 chars.


0

I believe I found out what was going on. When the dialog box asking for the passphrase appears (I think the dialog box is an application called pinentry), it has a check box that reads "Automatically unlock this key whenever I'm logged in". If you (accidentally) check that check box, it then does two things: (a) It registers the decision to automatically ...



Top 50 recent answers are included