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Move all of .gnupg to your USB stick. The native GnuPG for Windows builds have a registry setting, but the most portable option (working with both native and Cygwin versions) is to set the GNUPGHOME environment variable. If your Windows version has setx, run it from the Command Prompt: C:\> setx GNUPGHOME A:\Private\gnupg Otherwise, open the "System" ...


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From a message in the GnuPG user group: If you import a secret key and you don't have the public key, GPG will use the embedded public key data to recreate the public key, so effectively an exported secret key is like exporting a key pair. But it is a good idea to also send you public key with all signatures. Also, you can consider submitting your ...


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Signatures created using gpg --detach-sign contain one OpenPGP "signature" packet each. You can combine them to one file using ordinary cat, and most PGP programs should automatically recognize multiple signature packets in a single file.


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As was found out in the comments to the question, it turns out that this problem was because the message is being sent as HTML, albeit possibly without any explicit formatting. Sending as plain text should allow everything to work properly, and should not have any negative side effects on what you really want sent. It's possible that Edward simply doesn't ...


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You will also need to export the GPG_TTY variable every time when you start a new TTY (could also be done from bash/zsh rc files): export GPG_TTY=$(tty)


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If you import a key generated on another computer, you still have to put ultimate trust on it. From A GnuPG tutorial: In contrast with PGP and with early versions of GnuPG, ultimate trust is not automatically assigned to your own public key - it must be set by the user. If no ultimate trust is set, the web of trust will not work, and GnuPG will report ...


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Try trusting the public key: gpg --edit-key "Jonathan Max Barnes" then at Command> prompt type trust then answer 4 for fully to the resulting question. Details here


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This was fixed by checking the following in the OS X Thunderbird. Account settings > [Specific account] > OpenPGP Security > Use PGP/MIME by default. This has the additional advantage of allowing sending of html emails, and attachments. However, support for decryption is lacking in many clients (e.g. with Android K-9 + APG).


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GnuPG compresses (at least plain text) messages by default. If you do not want it to compress messages, set the compression level to 0 using the option --compress-level 0. From man gpg: --compress-level n [...] A value of 0 for n disables compression. Using -s together with a compression level of 0 will output the non-compressed signed message, actually ...


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As somebody who also doesn't like single points of failure (including master keys and especially passwords), this is the way I would do it. It allows for devices to operate via a web of trust, while still allowing decentralized identity. I don't know if there's already an existing system for this, but I think it could probably be scrobbled together with a ...



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