Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Because Henrik Carlqvist's answer seemed to "advanced" for my skills, I tried to just remove the mint partition in a live Gparted usb session, which showed this image But that was still inaccurate, because the 39.47 GB space of the mint partition appears both inside and outside the extended partition, but also outside of the 100 GB space of the ex-Win7 ...


1

Thanks for the xxd output. By converting it back to a binary file with xxd -r and studying that file with sfdisk I see the following: Device Boot Start End #cyls #blocks Id System xxd.bin1 * 25+ 23161- 23137- 185841664 7 HPFS/NTFS xxd.bin2 23161+ 29510- 6349- 50996224 7 HPFS/NTFS xxd.bin3 29510+ 47663- ...


1

From /proc/partitions we can see the following: 1) You have 4 primary partitions (1-4). A DOS partition table can have up to 4 primary partitions which in Linux is numbered 1-4. One of those primary partitions can be an extended partition containing more partitions. Your partition number 3 is an extended partition. 2) You have 2 logical partitions in your ...


0

You cannot install GParted on Mac OSX. You will have to use the Live Version. This is according to the GParted website itself. Here is a screenshot of it: You can definitely find GParted alternatives for Mac OSX here. I found something interesting here, that parted does not even compile for Mac OSX. Hope this helps!


0

Resizing the boot partition with an external editor (for example GParted) doesn't appear to work for non-NT versions of Windows. Booting will cause an unspecified error on my ancient Windows 98SE virtual machine.


3

If I understand your question correctly (and I might not), then I think that you wish to determine which libraries are being used by a particular application. In this case ldd is your friend. ldd /path/to/binary gparted is actually a script (well it is on my Debian Wheezy box), and to determine the executables which are being called, simply cat ...



Top 50 recent answers are included