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A modern graphics processor is a highly complex device and can have thousands of processing cores. The Nvidia GTX 970 for example has 1664 cores. These cores are grouped into batches that work together. For an Nvidia card the cores are grouped together in batches of 16 or 32 depending on the underlying architecture (Kepler or Fermi) and each core in that ...


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CPUs are SISD, GPUs are SIMD. SISD is an acronym for Single Instruction, Single Data. CPUs are good in performing sequential operations: take this, do that, move it there, take another one, add them both together, write to a device, read response, and so on. They execute mostly simple operations that take one or two values and return one value. SIMD is ...


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Graphical data is ideal for parallel processing. Divide a picture of 1024x1024 pixels into blocks of 16x16, and let each core process such a small block. Group the results back together and the result won't be different from one processor processing those blocks one by one. The condition for this to work is that results of one core won't influence the ...


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No, there is no detriment in using an AMD processor (CPU) with a Nvidia GPU. As Ramhound touched on in his comment, there are standards for intercommunication between devices. You may experience driver related issues when using 2 different GPUs in the same computer, in some cases.


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I noticed that this would only happen in Windows. When I overclocked my GPU in Lubuntu it worked perfectly. I ended up uninstalling ASUS AI Suite 3 and updating my NVIDIA drivers which solved the issue.


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main answer is they are simpler, so you can cram alot of them together, they used to do one task and that was putting frags on the screen. but nowadays they are more general in nature much like cpus. the main reason between cpus and gpus is that the cpu arcitecture is based on x86 and the one in gpu is based on AMD GCN or NVIDIA CUDA try reading ...


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CPUs have 1,2,4,6,8 cores or more. The same, GPUs have hundreds of them to thousands. That's why a top video card has around 80 times more float processing power than a quad core CPU. The difference is that they are type-specific and clustered(see answer above). Type-specific means they were designed to make specific not general computations. It is ...


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Assumption: Hugin was compiled with OpenMP and/or GPU support, which may be checked (from the Terminal) by: $ enblend -v -V | grep -E 'Extra.*(MP|GPU|cache)' Extra feature: image cache: yes Extra feature: GPU acceleration: yes Extra feature: OpenMP: no (for GPU-only version) and $ enblend-mp -v -V | grep -E 'Extra.*(MP|GPU|cache)' Extra ...


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If you want a second video card purely for desktop outputs (i.e. not gaming across multiple monitors) then any card will be fine. Windows 7 and above is quite capable of using outputs on different cards with an order of magnitude difference in speed for normal desktop use. Using different cards "as a unit" to spread the graphical load is impossible with ...



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