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6

Context is everything, but in general computer terms, video cards and graphics cards are the same thing. There are "video capture cards," which are often called "TV tuner cards" or "video encoder cards" that capture video (instead of outputting it). These would be used to record video such as TV shows, or get video from an old camcorder, or other playback ...


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Over the years the discrete graphics adapter market has adopted a tiered system to sell as many SKUs per GPU as possible. In general, although some OEMs and processes may differ slightly, here is how the third-party graphics adapter market works. A GPU designer/manufacturer (AMD/NVIDIA) designs a chip, tests it, and then mass produces it in an external ...


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With older systems, the 'onboard' graphics was a distinct chip on the motherboard. With modern intel systems, from sandy bridge onwards, its part of the CPU. The chipset that the video adaptor was part of has been merged into the CPU proper. The mainstream processors the z97 is designed for have GPUs built in. The server chips do not, and the onboard ...


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It could be that software changes (additions of background programs that use lots of RAM or CPU; new drivers with performance regressions; etc) could be part of the reason. However, because this is such a vague question with so little information, it's impossible for us to guess at any specific reason why it might be so. However, I can immediately point out ...


3

I did a little google search and found this guid from AsRock http://download.asrock.com/manual/virtu/Z68%20Pro3/English.pdf (carefull direct download link). It looks pretty generic. I stumbled across it on this ThomsHardware Thread Hope this is useful.


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Case A: There will be no graphics output. You can still connect a keyboard and mouse, but you won't be able to display anything Case B: You will be able to output video through your CPU, this is usually only good enough for excel/word/watching movies. Not recommended for gaming, rendering video, etc Case C: You will be able to output video through your ...


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Install GPU-Z and Core Temp to monitor your temperatures, because it sounds like you have an overheating problem. Keep them on-screen so you can see what the temperatures are; check frequently while doing whatever you normally do to cause the problem. The motherboard will kill power to the system if your GPU reaches 95C (According to the specs for the ...


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I figured out that installing software before installing the hardware was probably a bad idea. I removed any trace of it via drive sweeper http://downloads.guru3d.com/Guru3D---Driver-Sweeper-%28Setup%29_d1655.html I then did a standard clean install, worked without a hitch!


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I'd be tempted to try something like a matched pair of NVidia 210's. They are really cheap these days, maybe 20 £/$/€ each, low power consumption & can do 2 x 2560x1440 each. They are obviously not any good for gaming, but for simple 2D imagery they are fine, fanless & therefore silent, too.


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The graphics card is not that important, as you will only use one "machine" on it at a time, normally. The Memory is very important, as is the CPU chip. The i7 series are very quick due to the hyper threading. And, believe it or not, the Hard Drive can be very important as well. it is inherently the slowest point in the system, and now has to share itself ...


1

You don't need a display card for this. The motherboard in question has a GPU, and it has VGA, HDMI and DVI outputs directly on the board. The technician you talked to obviously had no idea, or was trying to upsell you the display card. Don't expect to be gaming from this setup, but desktop work and videos should work just fine. You can always add a ...


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My best guess would be the power supply as well. Just because it has enough watts doesn't mean there isn't some other problem. Can you get ahold of another PSU just for testing? Another thing to consider is how good of a heat sink do you have on your CPU? If the video card is throwing off a lot of heat, it can be adding to the heat of the CPU. Modern ...


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Mid to high end graphics cards these days do come with dual (or more) digital display outputs like DisplayPort, HDMI, and DVI. The lower end graphics cards still often come with VGA output, as people with lower end graphics cards will also have lower end monitors. So why does your card have a VGA out..? Well, I hate to break it to you, but the ATI HD8570 ...


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This is because your XFX Radeon R9 280 Double Dissipation Edition video card only has one DVI-I connection. The other DVI connection is DVI-D and can't be adapted to VGA. Output - DL-DVI-I : 1 Output - HDMI : 1 Output - mini DP : 1 Output - SL-DVI-D : 1 However, you could use the Mini DisplayPort connection for VGA using an adapter like ...


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Lucid Virtu MVP does not "switch" between integrated and discrete graphics, but it does utilize both by using hardware virtualization, giving you a similar effect. After installing the software (they have a free 30-day trial), you would connect your monitor to the video output on your motherboard. When you're not playing games, it uses the resources from ...


1

This issue is widely reported on AMD 700 and 800 series chipsets, as well as some older Intel boards. As far as I'm aware, neither AMD nor any motherboard/GPU OEMS have admitted any fault. Speculation I've seen includes the R9 290 pulling too much power through the PCI-Express slot, and general incompatibility with PCI-E 2.0 or lower. But honestly no one ...


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I have had a similar issue that was the result of the DVI cable having a short. If you have another cable try that as well as testing different outputs on the card to see if that fixes it.


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The fan running at full speed on a graphics card indicates that the card didn't boot (thus the logic that measures the temperature and adjusts the fan speed isn't working yet), it can happen if the motherboard is damaged (no power on the PCI-e bus ?), no power on the card's external connectors, or the card being damaged. Your old card may still work at a ...


1

After trying different ways to install the drivers my opinion is that in order to see the hardware the system needs some kind of software/drivers. Removing all drivers completely makes the hardware inaccessible. In most cases Windows will try to install some minimal generic drivers as soon as it detects their absence. In some cases removing the drivers will ...


1

It's quite possible you're running into subpixel hinting issues. In order to get as smooth a font as possible, modern operating systems will use a subpixel rendering algorithm to add blue and red bars to letter's pixels. This allows them to use 'sub' pixels and gain just a tiny fraction of increase in size. See the Wikipedia page for more information. You ...


1

The performance difference between card manufacturers will be small, and depends almost entirely on how high they've been clocked (i.e. the listed GPU and memory frequency). Perhaps the biggest difference between manufacturers is the cooling. The design of the power circuitry, firmware, fans, heatsinks, ducts and shrouds, can make a significant difference ...


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It's worth noting that the GPU on a laptop is usually connected (either internally on the GPU or an external chip) to a LVDS which is what sends the signal to the LCDs controller in order to render images on the screen, it may be possible to connect something up inside as LVDS controllers can be picked up easily online, however you might have trouble finding ...


1

Thanks to the advice given by and31415 (in the comments under other question) I was able to install the Catalyst driver and the Catalyst Control Center (and the rest of the Catalyst/AMD suite). The advice was to find first the harware's id. (See - How To Find Unknown Device Drivers By Their Vendor & Device ID) I will paste here the comments: "The ...


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Download the tool call OpenHardwareMonitor and add the AMD Radeon HD to the gadget. if the GPU is not used you see this: If the GPU is used you see the data of the GPU (Voltage, GPU/Mem speed, Temepature): Is your AMD card used or the Intel?


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Yes. To be more exact, you have 2 ports for either DVI's or HDMI or any combination, and additionally you can have displayports connected. So you cannot have 2 DVI and HDMI, but you can have 1 DVI and 1 HDMI or 2 DVI. The amount of displayports can be any. The total displayports depends on the graphicscard, but is not limited by the DVI or HDMI ports ...


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A Mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort should always work where a straight display port would work as far as I understand, since its the same signalling, just a different connector. Likewise an active display port to DVI/HDMI/VGA should always work where a plain display port would have. Regarding multiple displays with AMD cards, Id take a look at: How do I ...


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Even if you could I don't suggest you to add another graphics card with a PSU of 350 Watts.


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iGPU stands for Integrated Graphics Processing Unit. Integrated: An integrated graphics processing unit (GPU) doesn't use its own RAM; it utilizes the system's memory instead. Dedicated: A dedicated, or discrete, GPU has its own independent source of video memory, leaving the RAM your system uses untouched. According to the asus sabertooth z97 mark ...


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Looking at the specifications for each card on Newegg its worth pointing out the price delta isn't as large as one might expect coming only to around $1,000 USD. So one of the features that historically non-scientific graphic cards did not support were some of the following. One of the major CUDA features seems to be Hyper-Q and Dynamic Parallelism were ...


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No, it’s not possible. It will be connected to your CPU-integrated GPU and nowhere else. This is hard-wired and cannot be changed at all.



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