Hot answers tagged

60

No. Chances are very slim that your laptop has a 10 gigabit ethernet adaptor - its uncommon on high end desktops. You'd also need some clever hardware to translate between PCI-e to ethernet, and the latency, oh the latency. You have a device which is typically put as close to the processor as possible with 16 dedicated pci-e lanes right into it, and you'd ...


38

There's a few. Firstly, nearly every modern single mainstream1 processor has a integrated on die GPU. The chipset supports it. Essentially your only cost is the traces and connectors, so it's a 'free' feature you can design in - unlike older designs. Interestingly, many of the Sandy and Ivy Bridge-era Intel chipsets outside the Z series made you pick one or ...


16

Connecting a GPU by Ethernet is like connecting your PS3 controller to the PS/2 keyboard port: sounds like it's trying to fix a problem but the solution turns out to be completely outlandish and impractical. (Granted, if you can pull it off, you'll gain more popularity as that one crazy guy.) That said, I advise you not to try to do this because the ...


13

Do I need a separate OpenGL installation/upgrade or has it to be included into my graphic card driver? Where can I get it? OpenGL can't be "upgraded", and it must be included with your graphics driver. OpenGL exposes GPU hardware capabilities to the operating system. If your GPU hardware were more capable, it could support later revisions of OpenGL on ...


9

Sort of. If you have VT-D support, and have your video card passed through, you can Puget systems has an example build here and while there's much too much to include in my answer, here's the salient points. Your motherboard and processor matter. I've heard reports that regular mainstream boards may have vt-d disabled, and K series processors may not. ...


9

Probably not at commodity pricing for another few years. The current offerings are all high-end, using 10/40 Gbps connections and Nvidia Tesla cards. Even then, it's not directly usable for gaming or graphics, but more for CUDA processing. e.g. http://www.chelsio.com/gpudirect-rdma/


9

There are few wrong assumptions and they led you to wrong conclusions: Many motherboards marketed as "gaming" has an integrated Intel graphic cards. The graphic card is on CPU. Intel made this decision, not motherboard maker. When buying Intel, GPU cannot be avoided. I understand that putting in an integrated graphics into a motherboard ...


7

I had the same problem. Also tried reinstalling my drivers, did not work. This is what worked for me: Right click "Start" and select "Control Panel" (Open classic Control Panel) In the right corner -> View by: "Small Icons" Display Change Display Settings Now you will see the traditional display configuration screen. Select ("black/gray") extended ...


6

Try changing scrolling speed setting to -. "scroll_speed": 0,


6

Not with ethernet, but with PCIe and Thunderbolt. This article breaks down the external GPU (eGPU) landscape well. A number of companies sell PCIe/Thunderbolt enclosures. Some are limited by Thunderbolt's power, some have their own power. MSI GUS II using Thunderbolt and limited to 150W. Akitio Thunder2 PCIe Box using Thunderbolt 2, but only provides 25W. ...


5

The other answer is incorrect regarding VID. VID has nothing to do with the voltage on the card. VID usage is tied to the built-in hardware H.264 encoder found on GTX6xx and higher cards. (I am not sure if AMD cards have a hardware encoder on-die) A way to show this is by setting the video format under "Video Capture" in Afterburner to NVENC (Nvidia ...


5

The limit of six USB-connected monitors is imposed by the USB Adapters you're using. How many USB monitors can be supported by a single PC? Up to 6 USB displays are supported on a PC, and up to 4 displays on a Mac. Under Windows Multipoint Server, up to 14 USB clients are supported. http://www.displaylink.com/for-business/common_questions.php


5

This is an old card from 2003 build around the RV280 GPU.Searching on this GPU we find that it supports OpenGL 1.4. That means no hardware support for OpenGL 2.1. You either need a new card, or you need to emulate this in software. Emulating can work but will be very slow, making it a poor choice for gaming.


5

Don't be fooled by VirtualBox telling you that you have the latest version when using the Check for Updates... menu item, as that only reports minor updates. As Ramhound commented, there is a v5 line out that fixes the issue of installing Windows 10. You can see the latest major version as explained by JakeGould here. Download the latest VirtualBox and ...


5

Modern GPUs will run a hybrid mode where the drivers/GPU start streaming texture data from system RAM over the PCIe bus to make up for the "missing" RAM. Since system RAM is 3-5X slower than GDDR5 with much higher latency, running out of "VRAM" would translate into a slower application and significant FPS loss. However, the performance will be limited by ...


5

If you're willing to risk breaking the card entirely (beyond any reasonable hope of repair), you can try certain things that may or may not help. Your success or failure with these remedies depends on certain things: Whether or not the remedy you're attempting is able to fix the specific problem you're having The degree to which you execute the procedure ...


5

There's a few things to look at. The average "recommended power requirement" is a safe bet with a typical system though as always, your mileage may vary. I might choose to be nutty enough and somehow jam in a top of the line video card on a 5W processor and an emmc, or have a system with 6 hard disk drives or dual processors. The recommended power ...


5

The PSU must be capable of more than YYY watts, but that's far from being the whole story. First, the fact that a PSU has YYY watts written on it, does not mean that it is capable of really delivering YYY watts continuously. Most PSUs will fall short of this maximum, sometimes even by as much as 10%, depending on their quality. Second, the card is not ...


5

With a bit of reasoning and the help of some users in the comment section of my question I quickly came to the conclusion that my ghraphics card just died of old age. Installed in March 2011, it lasted around 5 years, and that's no surprise since that I used to use it quite a lot to play computer games etc. The red lines and random colored pixels make me ...


5

Not by Ethernet, but PC Mag ran a story last Sept on using a gaming card with a laptop connected via PCIe adapter card, Express Card, or Thunderbolt for Macbooks. http://www.pcworld.com/article/2984716/laptop-computers/how-to-transform-your-laptop-into-a-gaming-powerhouse-with-an-external-graphics-card.html The author uses a 2011 Thinkpad and under $200 ...


5

The closest you can come to what you want is, if you're gaming via Steam, to use the in home streaming option to use your network to route the display from the a gaming desktop to your laptop and user input from the laptop to the desktop running the game. This would require a full desktop somewhere in your home instead of just a laptop + external GPU; but ...


5

Could you please explain what it can be used for (I'm guessing the intentional use, but any other possible uses too) given that for a gaming PC one is most likely to utilize an external GPU? There are two uses I can think of for integrated video in enthusiast hardware: It can drive an additional monitor. Have one or two monitors driven by the ...


4

Go with the 750 watt power supply. It will be able to handle your system. I had a 500 watt power supply before and had issues with the computer shutting down due to high load from the graphics card when I upgraded to an i7 CPU and 970GTX graphics card.


4

Given that the server is not located near your computer, the answer is always going to be no. When you connect to the server over the internet, it will take time for a package to go from your pc, to your ISP, to the ISP of the server to the server, and then back again to your pc following that same route. This can mean that for each packet, it can take ...


4

CPUs are SISD, GPUs are SIMD. SISD is an acronym for Single Instruction, Single Data. CPUs are good in performing sequential operations: take this, do that, move it there, take another one, add them both together, write to a device, read response, and so on. They execute mostly simple operations that take one or two values and return one value. SIMD is ...


4

A virtual machine does not have access to physical device in your computer & hence you cannot install native drivers in the guest machine. All the devices are emulated by the virtual machine (Hypervisor if we are to say it more accurately) You should start with adding virtual guest additions & refer to learn how to emulate 2D/3D acceleration in ...


4

How do I identify which of a series my AMD graphics card is? AMD (neƩ ATI) seem to be a bit reticent to make the information readily available. However, they have a page on identifying which model of graphics card you might have: Provided that the graphics drivers are correctly installed and functioning, the model of the graphics card may be found using ...


4

The number of lanes available to a PCIe slot only determines the maximum amount of bandwidth available between the video card and the motherboard and has nothing to do with the maximum resolution a video card can display. Resolution is determined by the amount of memory the card has and the connection type to the screen (VGA, DVI, etc.) An x16 slot can ...


3

You're experiencing problems due to more than just latency. In the default configuration Remote Desktop does a poor job of handling graphics, making even the fastest server or Internet connection seem slow. But if you're running games based on Flash, Silverlight or DirectX, you can make these graphics-intense games playable over RDP with RemoteFX. ...


3

A modern graphics processor is a highly complex device and can have thousands of processing cores. The Nvidia GTX 970 for example has 1664 cores. These cores are grouped into batches that work together. For an Nvidia card the cores are grouped together in batches of 16 or 32 depending on the underlying architecture (Kepler or Fermi) and each core in that ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible