New answers tagged

1

Thanks for advise. It was ASUS Xonar Audio Center :))) I have turned off it and removed from autoload and circle was gone. I use ASUS Xonar DX audio card. This is strange but it seems that asus do "great" software for their audio cards :)))


-1

solution — update the onboard Intel HD Graphics 4600 driver. (the problem was I've updated only the Nvidia driver)


0

Go to "Switchable Graphic Application Setting" (bottom of your screenshot) Then change the setting of the apps that you want to use dedicate graphic to "High Performance" Hit Apply It should be running on dedicate graphic now.


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Try downgrading the driver from version: 364.72 - while somewhat alarmist - this article suggests that that specific release is buggy. I believe I had 361 earlier and it was fine. I'm personally not having issues with 364 either, but my guess would be the previous version should be fine for now.


3

Are you using BatteryBoost? NVIDIA BatteryBoost extends battery life by limiting the maximum frame rate. This reduces the load on the GPU and therefore power consumption. You should be able to adjust or disable this feature in GeForce Experience.


3

Did you try just switching to a different "console", with CTRL+ALT+F1 through F8? Those usually switch screen size/graphics modes and could throw a "reset" like command to the monitor. Sometimes CTRL+ALT+BACKSPACE is set to kill or restart the window manager too, it may cause a "reset" also. PS. Doing a pull-the-plug power off is terrible for most ...


1

I can see where you're coming from - why spend good money just to see if something works. Unfortunately, the only way to test if your graphics cards work (and, not only that, but if they work reliably under stress and over time) is to install them into a properly configured, compatible PC. That includes using a compatible and compliant power supply. If you ...


0

I would think you'd be pushing it with that PSU. This link shows a test system with this card drawing 375 watts. Test system setup: CPU Intel Core i7-3960X Sandy Bridge-E Motherboard ASUS P9X79 Deluxe Memory Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 16GB Hard Drive OCZ Agility 4 256GB SSD Sound Card On-board ...


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Ok, this PC has almost reached it's EOL (end of life). For a very casual gaming rig it might work, but you should invest a maximum of 100 $, and not a penny more! Being a BTX-case, upgrading the graphics card already qualifies as a separate topic. Anyways, here is my suggestion: Core2Duo E6700 (don't confuse it with DualCore E6700, which won't work!), e.g. ...


1

I use a piece of software called DisplayFusion to manage multiple monitor profiles. It can save and restore preset configurations, including spanning and even virtual sub-monitor splits. It also has window management features that I find very useful. I am in no way affiliated with the publisher, Binary Fortress, other than being a customer.


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It sounds like you're encountering the error when Windows tries to switch from the integrated Intel GPU to the dedicated nVidia GPU. The issue may have originally been caused by an automatic Windows 10 update to either graphics card driver (you can check this in Start > Settings > Update and Security > Advanced Options > View Update History). The first step ...


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You may want to try an online tool like https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/ to find that for yourself. :)


1

Not sure if this is a laptop or a desktop, but if it's a desktop then check if you have other ports to connect your monitor to to confirm it's not the monitor. Hooking up the monitor to another computer works too. You can also try re-installing the drivers and see if the green pixels return or not. Something else you could try to help debug this is to load ...


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We eventually resolved the issue by updating vorpX to the latest version and changing a setting in the vorpX ingame menu which is called Direct Mode Show Original


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Low wattage from a power supply would more likely shutdown the entire computer and not just the Graphics Card, as it would create a power deficiency for all systems, and BIOSes are not smart enough to make the call of shutting down one service if the power received is too low. While I would recommend upgrading your Power Supply Unit, this should not be the ...


0

So does that mean? Would it support something like the ZOTAC GeForce GT 730? Out of the box the card you mention will not be compatible. There are passive adapters that you can purchase which would be required to make it work with the HP Pavilion Desktop - 550-a114. The Wikipedia article on PCI Express explains the differences between Mini PCI-E and ...


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x16 and so on isthe number of channels. It should not normally be less than 1. You typically cannot 'easily' put a video card into a mini PCIe slot - there's boards that break out mini pcie to a full pcie connector with its own power supply (this google search should get you started), but your mini PCIe connection would be a bottleneck even if it was 1x for ...


0

Its a laptop. Your options for a video card upgrade are fairly limited. There's a laptop specific series of 'removable' video cards called MXM. Sadly they're only remotely standardised, and you can't put an arbitrary MXM card into an arbitrary system. I didn't have much luck working out if this is an MXM card. However, if the motherboards are the same, ...


0

I think the CPU sends video data to GPU through the bus and then GPU displays it. So faster GPU can handle more data from the CPU. In this way some of the processing of cpuoffload to GPU. Therefore you get faster speed in games. It's kind of like the RAM where CPU stores stuff so it can load and process quickly. Both make games faster. Or sound card or ...


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Use the Projector applet by holding the Windowskey and pressing P to cycle until it says Extend, then release Windows. edit: re-read your question, adding more upon comment replies


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The downsides would be: The lack of dedicated RAM on the graphics card, and you would have more active silicon on your CPU+GPU die, meaning the CPU might get hotter. The upsides are bigger though: The card is older, the on die GPU's are more modern. They use a lot less power, which means less heat, less cooling and a lower electricity bill. You gain a ...


1

What would be the downsides of doing so apart from the decreased RAM available to system? Aside from the RAM as you have already said, there would be no downsides, given the age of the video card you currently have. Is there a way to combine the graphics processing power of both the GPUs and output it through the NVIDIA card? No, there isn't. The ...


2

I've seen this before on external monitors, but never on a laptop panel. Basically your green color channel has become disconnected somehow. With an external monitor connected via an analog VGA cable, you can reproduce this effect by pulling one side of the connector out slightly so it's crooked. If the internal panel is connected with VGA, that would ...


0

If we are talking about an "older" PC, the first thing I would check is the temperatures. There is a feature called thermal throttling when your CPUs performance is lowered to sustain an ideal temperature. Open resource monitor (start - run - resmon), in the CPU tab, you can see Maximum Frequency. Make sure is 100% even when the CPU is under pressure. You ...


1

Issue resolved. The problem was with the charger, it was not giving the rated output. Learning If drivers and a hard reset do not fix the problem, temperatures are normal, clock speed is not limited but utilization is less, power supply could be a problem.


0

Yeah, you should be able to. They're all PCIe. Whether the older card will be better is debatable. Quadros are apparently better at double precision mathematics. Tesla's are 'pure' GPGPUs so they would have the same advantages as a tesla. I'd say test it, benchmark it and see ;)


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According to Dell's spec sheet for this model, you can have up to 3 PCI-Express x16 cards in this system with up to 675 watt power draw, so adding a GTX 480 should not be difficult. Personally, I would remove any existing video card prior to installing a new one. THe GTX 480 is a rather old card for gaming, you should look into a more recent model, it is ...


1

The 770 GTX has a TDP of around 230 Watts which means it pulls around 19 A on a +12 V rail. If you have two 770 GTXs then you need more then 38 A in a SLI configuration on the +12 V rail. Your Sharkoon WPM (700W) while it does provide, 54 A on the 12 V rail, that likely isn't enough if you consider the other components. What you want is a PSU which has ...


3

Short answer: No, it's not possible to have one monitor use integrated and the other monitor to use discrete on a laptop setup. Longer answer: Your best bet is to put both monitors on the GeForce card. You can configure your laptop to only use the GeForce card all the time, but it will use more power (and hence, drain the battery faster when on battery) in ...


-1

Check to make sure that you are using the actual monitor driver for your monitor, rather than a generic Windows VGA monitor.


0

SOLUTION: The GTX-465 card was indeed bad. Anything more precise than "bad" in our economy of disposable products would be impossible to determine. Removing said card from the computer solved the problem.


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After reading more about these types of symptoms online, I presumed that the graphics card had a problem with higher resolution modes. I ended up buying another GeForce GT 730 and replacing the non-functioning one with it and now I'm back to three working displays. So that was the problem.


1

The 8-pin PCIe power connectors can handle higher power demands than the 6-pin. The two additional pins in the 8-pin are simply 2 more ground wires. The video adapter needs 2x 6-pin to run, but can accept an 8-pin plug as well (for compatibility sake). So, from the video card's point of view, it doesn't matter if you use a 6-pin or an 8-pin PCIe from the ...


1

Probably not. No matter how large your card is it should entirely be supported by the screws at the PCIe slot openings at the rear and the PCI slot itself. There's nothing to screw a standoff to at all to anything in a standard case and these would not be used at all. and it might actually be potentially damaging to the card, placing lateral stresses ...


0

Single beep typically means System Memory Issues (check http://brebru.com/beepcodes.html or google 'single beep computer dead'). Either your memory is not good or not fast enough (or too fast) or the socket is broken or the chip is not correctly in the socket or something like that.


0

Nope. It's a sign that web sites have become more and more GPU intensive over time.


-2

If you have Windows 8 just right click go to graphics properties and turn everything to the minimum contrast,hue,saturation,brightness and it will become greyscale my 4 year old brother did that and gave us all a heartattack but we fixed it now haha


0

So, the card got replaced under warranty due to an unspecified "hardware fault". To summarize, if: you have problems like the in the question (intermittent card poweroff without a temperature spike), you've confirmed that your PSU is not underpowered w.r.t. your graphics card. Then simply arrange to check whether the fault occurs when the card is ...


0

Is the whole build new (Every component)? I'm making a lot of assumptions here just based on likeliness so anything you can clarify would help. (parts, OS etc.). I've had that issue while a Power Supply Unit was dying and unable to power the card. Another possibility is the seating of the card but guessing by your level of understanding you likely have ...


1

A good reason would be to use multiple monitors. Most of today's graphic cards have 2-3 physical monitor connectors (althou some could provide the image for more). But also many mainboards have grapic cards (or use the cpu for that) and have their own minitor connectors. So, it depends on how many monitors you want to connect. Another reason would be to use ...


0

I simply bought a new HDMI 2.0 compatible cable and everything works as intended now. Wondering what kind of HDMI feature my other cable didn't support.


0

Given that the x16 graphics card and the x1 card (in my experience, usually a serial/modem or multu-IO, though I've seen SSDs for x1) are used for different functions and the cards usually installed in x1 slots are typically for much less time-critical functions, both can work at full capacity (if the motherboard is well designed). The CPU will talk to the ...


1

How does PCI-e work with insufficient CPU lanes? Let me answer that in three parts: It is possible to use a chip to multiplex PCI-e lanes. Sort of an electronic Y-splitter. This is done on a few expensive motherboards. Or they can switch the number of used lanes. E.g. from x16/x0 to x8/x8. Or they add other sources of PCI-e lanes. PCI-e direct from ...


0

The second one is the closest, but depends on the manufacturer of the motherboard. Third one is plain wrong. First could happen, also depends on manufacturer. You should take a look at the motherboard spec sheet to see if your x1 slot is from the chipset or CPU. There are many configs possible; the x1 slots could be tied to SATA slots so that only one of ...



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