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0

I found the problem myself. The problem is in the display. I tried another display and the problem went away. Thank you @AndrewMorton for your help!


0

Here is a really proper answer. Due to Surface Pro 2 have an i5-4300U CPU which have integrated Intel HD4400 GPU, it natively supports three displays over a single Mini DisplayPort. The feature is called Multi-Stream technology and you will need either a Multi-Stream Transport hub (MST hub — just like familiar USB hub, but for displays) or compatible ...


3

This looks like a power supply "problem". It seems your old card - the Nvidia GT 620 - has a power draw of up to 49W. Few PCs have a power draw of significantly more than 100W, without GPU. A standard 200W power supply covers this easily. I can't manage to find the exact spec for your new card, the AMD R7 260x, but from what I can find it clearly has a much ...


1

You can indeed build your own laptop. It might be slightly more complicated than building a desktop, but not horribly more difficult. It probably won't be much cheaper than buying a pre-built laptop, and you won't have the wide range of hardware options and customization options you'd get with a desktop, because there aren't a lot of people who want to build ...


0

VGA is analog. Dvi-d can receive digital signal only. Dvi-a can accept a VGA cable with adapter, but these are less common now. It was only an intermediary technology as we were transitioning from VGA to newer technology such as Dvi and later hdmi. Dvi-I can accept both analog and digital, but your monitor doesn't support that. You can see the different ...


0

Remember that you cannot put a VGA monitor (analog) into a DVI-D (digital Only Port). nothing will work I presume. I think it should if it was a dvi-I port which is digital and analog or just dvi-a which is analog only.


3

From http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/CROSSHAIR_V_FORMULAZ/ : AMD® 990FX Chipset is designed to support up to 5.2GT/s HyperTransport™ 3.0 (HT 3.0) interface speed and dual PCI Express™ 2.0 x16 graphics. It is optimized with AMD® latest AM3+ and multi-core CPUs to provide excellent system performance and overclocking capabilities. Your board ...


0

Put the 2 monitors on Duplicate or Mirror. you can do this by going into the software or Press the windows key + P key and go to duplicate.


1

This can happen on Dells in particular if you have an add-on video card installed in a PCIe slot, but you're hooking the monitor up to the onboard video port, OR you are connecting the monitor using a DisplayPort -> VGA adapter. The first scenario is most likely what you're running into. If that's the case, you have a couple options: Hook the screen up ...


0

The textures applied to 3D objects are held in the graphics cards memory. By reducing the memory, you reduce the amount and/or size of the the textures that can be loaded at one time. With lower memory, you may have to wait for a texture to load and be rendered. Also, lowering the graphics memory can reduce the amount of onscreen objects that can be ...


0

Have you checked at what the core clocks are running at while in idle? Maybe the ultra low power state (ulps) registry settings is corrupted.


0

Your desktop screen configuration could play into the high temperature. I had one screen in landscape and the other in portrait with slightly different resolutions. This caused my resting temp to be about 85C. Once I set them both to the same settings my temp dropped 25 degrees to a resting 60C. It's a bit counter-intuitive that having dual monitors with ...


0

It appears your action of upgrading your graphics driver has caused your graphics adapter to set a default resolution far too high for your monitor to handle - hence it going into power saving mode. Ubuntu has probably booted in the background, but your monitor can't use the signal it is being supplied by your graphics card... Ubuntu is extremely resilient. ...


0

The difference between DVI-I and DVI-D is that the DVI-D only outputs a digital signal. Your monitor may be analog so it is not compatible. It may also be that you've disabled the auto-select source option on your monitor and it is stuck on analog now. Look for a way to select the digital source on your monitor. If this isn't available then I'd guess that ...


0

PCI Express x16 means that there are 16 communication channels in the interface between the motherboard and video card. If your motherboard has a PCIx x16 slot, then you can get a PCIx x16 card (best) or any number of channels down to PCIx x1. If your motherboard only has a PCIX x8 slot, a PCIx x16 card will not fit in it.


-1

Could be literally* a million things If theres very little dust and your computer is sandwiched between the desk and the wall, and otherwise in a space that you yourself would not be comfortable in = then you have bad cooling and mmmmaybe your GPU is dead, if not more. If theres dust: It overheated and died (probably) If theres no dust, coolings fine: But ...


0

Your GPU is at fault. The fact you see artifacts in the BIOS indicates this isn't a driver issue, and you further confirmed the problem is caused by your GPU by switching to your integrated graphics and observing the problem went away. Before counting the GPU as a loss, examine it for excessive dust or a non- or poorly-operating fan. It could be ...


1

update your drivers and also check if your PC is having an adequate power supply to power your graphics card. If you overclock, make sure you don't mess with the PCI-E bus frequency.


0

The PSUs power is enough and it also is a decent one. I compared benchmarks results of your CPU and mine (i5 3570K) and your CPU is consuming ~50 Watt (full load) more than mine. Seen here. My GPU on the other hand is more power hungry than yours and I run my CPU overclocked with a 450 W PSU. For me there are two possibilities what might cause this. Your ...


0

This problem can be caused by different things. Please make sure the following things are in order Install the latest drivers for your graphics card and motherboard. Download the latest versions from the manufacturers website. Make sure all the power cables are connected well enough (24 pin motherboard, 4/8 pin CPU, PCI-E power connectors for you graphics ...


0

A lot of laptop manufacturers [HP included] restrict your graphics drivers to updates provided only by the laptop manufacturer, not the Graphics chip manufacturer. Unfortunately, this can mean that when they stop providing updated drivers, you're stuck. Depending on what graphics card is in the machine, try either... http://support.amd.com/en-us for ...


1

The only speed "guaranteed" to not damage your card is the factory speed. If going faster would never damage the card or cause problems, they would have sold it that way (usually). Overclocking is at your own risk. The process of overclocking is generally to increase the overclock slowly, making sure it is stable at those settings before continuing. Once it ...


1

problem solved. get rid of cinnamon, install xfce. $ inxi -Gxz Graphics: Card-1: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] Kaveri [Radeon R7 200 Series] bus-ID: 00:01.0 Card-2: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] Barts PRO [Radeon HD 6850] bus-ID: 01:00.0 X.Org: 1.15.1 driver: fglrx Resolution: 5760x2160 GLX Renderer: AMD Radeon HD 6800 ...


0

I had the same problem and resolve it by changing the thermal paste both from the CPU and GPU. My laptop is like brand new !


0

So here's how I solved it: I opened up the RAM bay and removed the RAMs. Then, using a nitrogen tank (using anything other than compressed air or an inert gas without dust particles can cause the hardware to be damaged with static electricity) with very low pressure, I blew the dust from the RAM bay to the fan. A lot of dust, along with some hair, flew out ...


1

Interestingly, this shouldn't have happened by accident. Lets tear this down 1) You had multi GPU support turned on (amusingly - this is a prerequisite for lucid logix virtu). Adding an discrete card should have disabled your onboard adaptor otherwise, unless that's changed post Ivy Bridge. 2) You had your monitor plugged into the motherboard as you found ...


0

I'm guessing you're faced with an MXM module, which is kinda sort of the standard for replaceable laptop graphics cards. There are adaptors between MXM III and PCIe but they seem expensive enough that buying a new GPU looks like a better option.


4

I'm an idiot and not plugging things into the graphics card does indeed mean it's not being used. Solution: go buy another HDMI cable. UPDATE: Bought an HDMI to DVI cable and graphics card is now under load when playing games, and can run Mirror's Edge at max settings with no noticeable frame issues. Not much of a claim to fame but it's the only thing I ...


0

On a Dell Inspiron 15 (3537), I had the same problem with Debian Wheezy, and it appears that it is too old to properly deal with Intel Haswell kit. I couldn't find a way to make it work. Upgrading to Jessie (testing, but on the verge of release) solves the problem and all the laptop hardware works perfectly.


1

Looking at the specifications for each card on Newegg its worth pointing out the price delta isn't as large as one might expect coming only to around $1,000 USD. So one of the features that historically non-scientific graphic cards did not support were some of the following. One of the major CUDA features seems to be Hyper-Q and Dynamic Parallelism were ...


0

I had the same issue when turning on my machine today. It was booting fine except that I had no video (I heard the startup sound and it would shut down fine). I could boot into safe mode but not VGA mode. I found that after disabling the display adapter my machine would boot normally. My machine is running Win 7 Pro with an ATI video card. The only change ...


0

This issue is one of two things: Since you've already tried plugging it into the different outputs and ruled that out, the only thing left is that Windows is possibly not detecting the native resolution of the display properly and is using a resolution that is too high for the monitor to display. Do an F8 boot of Windows, but do not choose safe mode. ...


0

Sounds like the Asus card you were given is faulty, so you need to confirm/refute that. To that end do some troubleshooting; specifically, try it in another computer and see how it acts.


0

You could try disabling the OpenGL option under video settings. I don't recall this being a requirement for higher end texture packs. Also, I've always found Optifine to be useful with higher end texture packs. https://optifine.net/home Improves framerate and allows for more tweaks to the video settings.


1

iGPU stands for Integrated Graphics Processing Unit. Integrated: An integrated graphics processing unit (GPU) doesn't use its own RAM; it utilizes the system's memory instead. Dedicated: A dedicated, or discrete, GPU has its own independent source of video memory, leaving the RAM your system uses untouched. According to the asus sabertooth z97 mark ...


4

Are you sure that your system goes haywire at GPU's temperature going over 65°C? Because in my opinion, 65°C is not hot. Hot is when GPU reaches 80-90°C. Even then it works. I believe the problem is somewhere else. Just to be sure, blow any dirt off of the heat sink. If you feel comfortable you could remove the heat sink and replace the thermal paste. Then ...


0

Reset your graphics card settings It is common problem that when you overclock or change some of the settings of the GPU, video games or other media apps start to shutter. Also, your graphics card is 4 years old. Maybe your PC is not well ventilated? Sources: https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/483211/9500-gt-stuttering/?offset=2 ...


0

Most likely your card suffered some form of damage and lags or stutters when that part is accessed. It does not always have to result in a crash of your computer when your video card accesses bad parts of its hardware. I suggest trying a new video card. I imagine the problems will disappear.


0

Well I would suggest adding up the power requirements of all the hardware components you have. To include but not limited to: CPU Motherboard Video Card(s) RAM Hard Drives Optical Drives Fans and anything else drawing power If the total power needed is lower than what the power supply puts out then you should be fine. If not or if it is close then I ...


1

Even if you could I don't suggest you to add another graphics card with a PSU of 350 Watts.


1

A Mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort should always work where a straight display port would work as far as I understand, since its the same signalling, just a different connector. Likewise an active display port to DVI/HDMI/VGA should always work where a plain display port would have. Regarding multiple displays with AMD cards, Id take a look at: How do I ...


1

Yes. To be more exact, you have 2 ports for either DVI's or HDMI or any combination, and additionally you can have displayports connected. So you cannot have 2 DVI and HDMI, but you can have 1 DVI and 1 HDMI or 2 DVI. The amount of displayports can be any. The total displayports depends on the graphicscard, but is not limited by the DVI or HDMI ports ...


4

It could be that software changes (additions of background programs that use lots of RAM or CPU; new drivers with performance regressions; etc) could be part of the reason. However, because this is such a vague question with so little information, it's impossible for us to guess at any specific reason why it might be so. However, I can immediately point out ...


0

we deployed these at work, every single one has the issue you describe. get a DP++ to DVI cable (or whatever your monitor supports). the plug for this is right next to VGA port on the left side of your laptop. this should fix your issue.


0

The PSU should be protected against overload. The worst (practical) thing that can happen is that you blow a fuse on the PSU. The worst theoretical thing is that your PC can catch fire, or blow a fuse in your house's electical system. Most likely the PSU will just switch off when it detects an overload, but it depends on the model. However, the PSU might ...


1

It's worth noting that the GPU on a laptop is usually connected (either internally on the GPU or an external chip) to a LVDS which is what sends the signal to the LCDs controller in order to render images on the screen, it may be possible to connect something up inside as LVDS controllers can be picked up easily online, however you might have trouble finding ...


0

For the benefit of anybody arriving here. It can be done: http://www.techradar.com/news/computing-components/graphics-cards/how-to-make-an-external-laptop-graphics-adaptor-915616 I am not sure how you would connect it to the Laptop's panel however. That said, I get good use from an old Laptop that had the dreaded Nvidia bug by installing Windows and ...


3

With older systems, the 'onboard' graphics was a distinct chip on the motherboard. With modern intel systems, from sandy bridge onwards, its part of the CPU. The chipset that the video adaptor was part of has been merged into the CPU proper. The mainstream processors the z97 is designed for have GPUs built in. The server chips do not, and the onboard ...


1

You don't need a display card for this. The motherboard in question has a GPU, and it has VGA, HDMI and DVI outputs directly on the board. The technician you talked to obviously had no idea, or was trying to upsell you the display card. Don't expect to be gaming from this setup, but desktop work and videos should work just fine. You can always add a ...


0

Change your Power Plan settings The power plan is limiting the resources for the graphics card to function properly. Change all the settings to the Maximum Performance. How I fixed the problem: Install the latest drivers from the official AMD website (Catalyst 14.0+). Change you Power Plan to High Performance (in battery and plugged-in). Go to Control ...



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