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As it is hard to understand exactly what is the cause of your problem, I will take a guess. I guess, you are using GPT partition scheme, as your hard drive is pretty large and it used to be UEFI based. Check this out. And a quote from the link: While GPT support on BIOS systems is theoretically possible it sometimes isn't practical and other times ...


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SD cards are NORMALLY addressed as /dev/mmcblkXY for ex. /dev/mmcblkp1 Other than that the usual grub install /update commands work fine


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That's normal, Windows has wrote on the MBR of your disk and now, at boot time, the bios goes straight to its boot loader. To recover your installation, all you have to do is to boot on a Linux live system, chroot on your mint, and re run grub-install. You can for example use this walkthrough : ...


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I've seen that before... The Windows installers won't load correctly unless they're on their own dedicated install drive, which is why windows refuses to complete setup. simply because YUMI can't properly emulate the drive


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The problem was that grub would automatically boot using the default configuration. This default config would mess something up with the display settings. When this happened, I would hold the power button to cycle the machine. The next time it booted up, it noticed that there wasn't a clean shutdown so I got presented with the grub menu. Selecting the ...


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This isn't going to be terribly helpful in your friend's case (unless there's a way I'm unaware of to get plop on the device in the first place -- maybe a usb cd-rom, or usb floppy drive?), but this is a terrific little application, which has helped me rig a number of old machines to boot off of usbs when their bios wouldn't allow it. Plop Boot Manager


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My solution was to install rEFInd -- this way it is possible to boot my linux partition directly, skipping grub, and works without the VGA plugged. Now I have a headless server de fato.


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Problem solved. I found on a website that I had to add reboot=bios to my GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT field in my /etc/default/burg file, like this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash vga=791 reboot=bios" Here is my reference (that problem also happens with GRUB): https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Grub2#Fixing_reboot.2Fshutdown_freezes


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try grub-install "UUID=700C663F-4183-4A8D-BAC2-EE34E5518B9C" /dev/sda0 UUID is "/" partition sda0 is "/" device Source is grub2 manual /dev/disk/by-uuid/ does not work because this directory does not exist until is booted it is preferred to use partuuid as this dos not change with reformatting- uuid changes with formatting


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Have you tested the hard drive to see if there are errors? Check your SMART logs and run something like Spinrite or Drive Fitness Test. To me that sounds like read errors (bad sectors) causing the error correction rate to be too high where the hard drive gives up.


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All windows installers (at least the ones that I've used from 3.1 to Win 7) install their own bootloader if one is not found (and of course, it does not recognize Grub or Lilo). What you need to do is reinstall grub, by booting up linux somehow (live CD, the install image, or a USB install. It doesn't matter, really), and run this command: grub-install ...


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Some of your problems, such as installers not accepting the mount points you specify, are clearly distribution-specific and should be addressed as individual questions relating to them, possibly on distribution-specific forums. To the overall question of how to configure a boot manager for your complex multi-OS setup, I will first advise you to not create ...



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