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18

CentOS7 is using grub2 and the generated /boot/grub2/grub.cfg rather than the old grub.conf format, which is why you can't find it. The new grub.cfg file is not intended for direct editing, instead you need to modify the source files that are used to generate it. The files in question are /etc/default/grub and the scripts in /etc/grub.d/. In particular, ...


10

Open up /etc/default/grub with root privledges and add GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="resume=/dev/sdXY" Where XY is the swap partition location, which can be found by sudo fdisk -l. It looks like you are using UUID instead and that's fine. /etc/default/grub only affects the current operating system so don't worry about every linux OS using grub to start using that swap....


9

After googled, I still can't found a way to scroll up the output of grub2 shell. However, there's a way to pause output (like the behaviour of more command) - the pager environment variable. 13.1.24 pager If set to ‘1’, pause output after each screenful and wait for keyboard input. The default is not to pause output. So, issue set pager=1 command ...


6

To answer my own question. This grub2 entry worked. menuentry 'Xen 4 with Linux 2.6.32.45-xen' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os --class xen { recordfail insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,1)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set 75475e50-82e2-4f74-b860-6cf92c91b42e multiboot /xen.gz placeholder ...


6

Since I figured this out yesterday I may as well point the answer. To go from GRUB2 to another MBR you need to do the following menuentry "Other Disk" { insmod part_msdos set root='(hd1)' drivemap -s hd0 hd1 chainloader (hd1)+1 } That is booting my GRUB2 into GRUB managed by OpenSUSE. hd1 could be swapped for any other drive or partition....


6

You can see whether GRUB (1 or 2) is installed on the MBR with dd: dd if=/dev/sda bs=512 count=1 2> /dev/null | grep -q GRUB && echo "GRUB found" If GRUB signature was found you can then run: file -s /dev/sda If the output is something like: /dev/sda: x86 boot sector; GRand Unified Bootloader, stage1 version 0x3........... then you ...


6

My goodness, this is just a mess. Here are just some of the problems that stand out: "0xEE partition doesn't start on sector 1" You don't have a type 0xEE partition on those discs, now. If, as this message indicates, you did have it, then at one point your discs were partitioned with a very different partition table mechanism, which your "repairs" ...


5

Try editing your regular boot entry in grub (e shortcut and appending init=/bin/sh to end of the line beginning with linux .... After you will boot it (Ctrl-x), you will get a root shell immediately.


5

Run Xubuntu from LiveCD or LiveUSB and install Boot-Repair. To install Boot-Repair, open up a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and type the following commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair && sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair After installation, Boot-Repair will automatically launch. ...


5

I know you want to find a simple solution for your simple question, but I'm afraid that there is no easy solution for you, because almost all live cds are boot with isolinux, i.e., not grub, so there is no way you can edit grub when booting from the live cd. You can re-create the live cd to boot with grub if you want. Ref: Booting CD with grub Or your can ...


4

I followed the guidelines from this post (on the 6 section) GRUB 2 will find and create a menuentry for the Windows (Vista) Recovery partition. At least in Vista, the menu name is the same as the normal Vista operating partition, the only difference being the parttion designation. To remove the Recovery partition entry from the menu: ...


4

You mean removing the grub boot sector so that it won't boot from it? It is just the first sector in your drive or partition. Backup, be very cautious! $ dd if=/dev/sda1 bs=512 count=1 of=sda1.bootsector.backup $ dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda1 bs=512 count=1


4

The Web page linked to in the original post includes the following feature specification: Patented DualBIOS with Hybrid EFI technology for 3TB HDD support The Hybrid EFI is a very buggy EFI implementation that's built as a layer atop a traditional BIOS. I've got a computer with this setup myself, and the firmware implementation is pretty awful. It is ...


4

You need to boot using the Fedora install CD and from there install GRUB to the widows drive. This will delete the windows bootloader but you will still be able to load windows through grub. When you've booted into the Fedora live session, you will have to mount your local drives and set up a chroot environment. There is a very good answer on how to use ...


3

On systems with such a recovery partition, usually the active partition is the recovery partition. The recovery partition displays the "Press F11" message, and if not pressed, forwards over to the main OS partition. The MBR is essentially dumb; all it does is choose one of the partitions, and forwards over to that partition's VBR. If you wanted a linux/...


3

According to the Grub2 wiki, if you set/add the GRUB_TIMEOUT directive and change the value to -1, you will cause GRUB2 to pause until you make a decision, which seems to be what you're looking for.


3

Assuming you're willing to boot an ISO image, I managed to find this blog post. In brief: Create some sort of Linux partition on the USB disk. ext2 should do, if you don't want the journal to take up excess space. Mount the partition. Run this command: grub-install --force --no-floppy --root-directory=MOUNT /dev/sdX. This will install GRUB2 under the ...


3

Luckily the Fedora Wiki covers this topic! Seems you can just reinstall GRUB very easily, just using a live CD. Boot the system from an installation boot medium. (live CD/USB) Type linux rescue at the installation boot prompt to enter the rescue environment. Type chroot /mnt/sysimage to mount the root partition. Type /sbin/grub-install bootpart to ...


3

If you install Linux, during the process of installation - GRUB boot loader will be installed to your system. This boot loader will allow you to dual boot between Windows and Linux


2

Mount /boot with ext2tools or whatever and modify the boot order


2

Would this do the trick? http://www.ubuntugeek.com/how-to-read-ext3ext4-linux-partition-from-windows-7.html It will also run under XP


2

You could try installing grub-pc tools to automatically detect all available operating systems sudo aptitude install grub-pc and then update grub2 for your next restart sudo update-grub2 if Windows is correctly installed it should now be added to grub.cfg


2

found it. in the file /etc/grub.d/40_custom add the line set timeout=0 and the menu won't appear any more.


2

This ended up working: sudo update-grub Though, it killed my Win7 raid, at least at first. After a couple reboots into linux (which could still somehow access the raid, even though it was clearly broken in the raid boot menu), the raid was functional again, and I could boot into Win7 from grub2.


2

Boot up an Ubuntu 10.10 Live CD and open a terminal. Then type this: sudo mkdir /mnt/sda5 sudo mount /dev/sda5 /mnt/sda5 sudo grub-install --root-directory=/mnt/sda5 /dev/sda (hd0,4) in GRUB 1 corresponds to (hd0,5) in GRUB 2, which Maverick uses, and both correspond to the first logical partition of your first drive, which is /dev/sda5 in normal (non-...


2

A LiveCD will have a directory structure like this: |-- autorun.inf |-- boot | |-- grub | | |-- desktops | | |-- extended | | |-- grldr | | |-- iso9660_stage1_5 | | |-- menu.lst <--- GRUB Menu Listing | | |-- message | | `-- stage2 | |-- initrd-nx08.gz | |-- pxelinux.0 | |-- pxelinux.cfg | | |-- default | | `-- ...


2

To show the results of init scripts, remove the quiet option like this : GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="splash" To correct the forever wait, try to edit the file in /etc/grub.d/00_header and replace if [ ${recordfail} = 1 ]; then set timeout=-1 else set timeout=${GRUB_TIMEOUT} fi with set timeout=${GRUB_TIMEOUT} then launch sudo update-grub


2

Go download one of the Windows 7 ISO images and burn it to DVD. http://www.mydigitallife.info/download-windows-7-iso-official-32-bit-and-64-bit-direct-download-links/ Then you need to boot to the recovery console, and use the BCDEdit Command: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc709667(WS.10).aspx http://support.microsoft.com/kb/919529 (not ...


2

I'll assume you did this using a live CD or a live USB. You can simply run the Live CD/USB again and using the instructions below: 1.Mount your Ubuntu Partition as in this picture: 2.Now you need to verify and copy one thing; run mount | tail -1 in a terminal You should see output similar to this: /dev/sda2 on /media/0d104aff-ec8c-44c8-b811-...


2

Interesting problem. Someone on this forum posted adding insmod vbe to their grub config did the trick for them. The Ubuntu community documentation for Grub2 (which is the version of grub that comes with Ubuntu 11.04) should also help. The section here suggests that you can probe available resolutions from the grub prompt by pressing 'c' from the main grub ...



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