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5

Try editing your regular boot entry in grub (e shortcut and appending init=/bin/sh to end of the line beginning with linux .... After you will boot it (Ctrl-x), you will get a root shell immediately.


5

Open up /etc/default/grub with root privledges and add GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="resume=/dev/sdXY" Where XY is the swap partition location, which can be found by sudo fdisk -l. It looks like you are using UUID instead and that's fine. /etc/default/grub only affects the current operating system so don't worry about every linux OS using grub to start using that ...


5

Run Xubuntu from LiveCD or LiveUSB and install Boot-Repair. To install Boot-Repair, open up a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and type the following commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair && sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair After installation, Boot-Repair will automatically ...


5

You can see whether GRUB (1 or 2) is installed on the MBR with dd: dd if=/dev/sda bs=512 count=1 2> /dev/null | grep -q GRUB && echo "GRUB found" If GRUB signature was found you can then run: file -s /dev/sda If the output is something like: /dev/sda: x86 boot sector; GRand Unified Bootloader, stage1 version 0x3........... then you ...


4

You need to boot using the Fedora install CD and from there install GRUB to the widows drive. This will delete the windows bootloader but you will still be able to load windows through grub. When you've booted into the Fedora live session, you will have to mount your local drives and set up a chroot environment. There is a very good answer on how to use ...


4

You mean removing the grub boot sector so that it won't boot from it? It is just the first sector in your drive or partition. Backup, be very cautious! $ dd if=/dev/sda1 bs=512 count=1 of=sda1.bootsector.backup $ dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda1 bs=512 count=1


4

I followed the guidelines from this post (on the 6 section) GRUB 2 will find and create a menuentry for the Windows (Vista) Recovery partition. At least in Vista, the menu name is the same as the normal Vista operating partition, the only difference being the parttion designation. To remove the Recovery partition entry from the menu: ...


4

To answer my own question. This grub2 entry worked. menuentry 'Xen 4 with Linux 2.6.32.45-xen' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os --class xen { recordfail insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,1)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set 75475e50-82e2-4f74-b860-6cf92c91b42e multiboot /xen.gz placeholder ...


3

According to the Grub2 wiki, if you set/add the GRUB_TIMEOUT directive and change the value to -1, you will cause GRUB2 to pause until you make a decision, which seems to be what you're looking for.


3

Since I figured this out yesterday I may as well point the answer. To go from GRUB2 to another MBR you need to do the following menuentry "Other Disk" { insmod part_msdos set root='(hd1)' drivemap -s hd0 hd1 chainloader (hd1)+1 } That is booting my GRUB2 into GRUB managed by OpenSUSE. hd1 could be swapped for any other drive or ...


3

Luckily the Fedora Wiki covers this topic! Seems you can just reinstall GRUB very easily, just using a live CD. Boot the system from an installation boot medium. (live CD/USB) Type linux rescue at the installation boot prompt to enter the rescue environment. Type chroot /mnt/sysimage to mount the root partition. Type /sbin/grub-install bootpart to ...


3

The Web page linked to in the original post includes the following feature specification: Patented DualBIOS with Hybrid EFI technology for 3TB HDD support The Hybrid EFI is a very buggy EFI implementation that's built as a layer atop a traditional BIOS. I've got a computer with this setup myself, and the firmware implementation is pretty awful. It is ...


2

I know you want to find a simple solution for your simple question, but I'm afraid that there is no easy solution for you, because almost all live cds are boot with isolinux, i.e., not grub, so there is no way you can edit grub when booting from the live cd. You can re-create the live cd to boot with grub if you want. Ref: Booting CD with grub Or your can ...


2

I don't see a reason why you should need to start over, but there are two things you definitely need: a kernel to boot from and the grub configuration folder in /boot. I've not installed Arch for at least 279 days (the current uptime on my home fileserver), and I know things have changed since then so I'm a bit rusty on specifics.... But what you need to do ...


2

You have two main choices (assuming you want to use grub and not the windows one as your bootloader). Tell Mint not to install a bootloader. That way, your Ubuntu grub will remain untouched. The first time you reboot after installing Mint, you won't see an entry for it, you will have to boot into Ubuntu, run update-grub2 to detect it and then reboot ...


2

You should be fine, as there are many ways to do this and you don't need the original installation disc. Have a quick look at this article: http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-safely-uninstall-ubuntu-in-windows-dual-boot-environment/


2

I don't know of any GRUB variant which doesn't require some sort of on-disk configuration, but you might want to look into alternatives. I personally use Chameleon ( http://chameleon.osx86.hu/ ), since it is capable of booting OS X, chainloading to the Windows boot manager and multiple linux distributions. It auto-detects on boot. However, a better fit for ...


2

No, the windows 7 bootloader is not able to boot a windows 8 parition. The windows 8 boot loader is a new version ( UEFI ) that allows a secure boot option, different from windows 7, and is required to be able to boot Windows 8. Once you have windos 8 installed, you can modify the boot menu to describe both win8/win7 partitions.


2

The second Windows installation should have been detected automatically. I am surprised that you don't see the Windows boot manager on each boot. Anyway, yes, you can do this with GRUB but using the Windows bootloader is much easier. GRUB needs to chainload Windows and configuring it is harder than for Linux systems. Plus, you will probably have to boot ...


2

If you're not using Linux, just create a bootable USB stick with EasyBCD and add an entry for each Windows installation to it. It'll do exactly what you want, and should be a net total of 3 point and click operations.


2

After googled, I still can't found a way to scroll up the output of grub2 shell. However, there's a way to pause output (like the behaviour of more command) - the pager environment variable. 13.1.24 pager If set to ‘1’, pause output after each screenful and wait for keyboard input. The default is not to pause output. So, issue set pager=1 command ...


2

Solved. The GRUB menu entry for Windows 8.1 had this line: drivemap -s (hd0) ${root} After commenting it, Windows now boots correctly from GRUB. I don't know why update-grub included it, though (hd0 is the first HD drive, where Mint is, while Windows is in hd1, the second drive). EDIT: the file I am talking about is /boot/grub/grub.cfg. Entries of ...


2

My goodness, this is just a mess. Here are just some of the problems that stand out: "0xEE partition doesn't start on sector 1" You don't have a type 0xEE partition on those discs, now. If, as this message indicates, you did have it, then at one point your discs were partitioned with a very different partition table mechanism, which your "repairs" ...


2

There are ways of adding ISO's to grub2 configurations. It is easier to use other options, however. Download memtest86+-4.20.bin (Latest as of 11/2011) Place it in your /boot partition. (Just like your Linux kernels) Add the following to /etc/grub.d/40_custom (It should be on three lines, like this) menuentry "Memtest 86+" { linux16 /memtest86+.bin } ...


2

Go download one of the Windows 7 ISO images and burn it to DVD. http://www.mydigitallife.info/download-windows-7-iso-official-32-bit-and-64-bit-direct-download-links/ Then you need to boot to the recovery console, and use the BCDEdit Command: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc709667(WS.10).aspx http://support.microsoft.com/kb/919529 (not ...


2

Assuming you're willing to boot an ISO image, I managed to find this blog post. In brief: Create some sort of Linux partition on the USB disk. ext2 should do, if you don't want the journal to take up excess space. Mount the partition. Run this command: grub-install --force --no-floppy --root-directory=MOUNT /dev/sdX. This will install GRUB2 under the ...


2

You don't have to boot from exact Ubuntu version, you can run grub-install with --root-directory option (if your required partition is mounted to /mnt): grub-install --root-directory=/mnt /dev/sda It's a good idea to have a separate /boot partition.


2

The only easy way to do this is with the Lenovo recovery DVDs (and you'd be looking a complete reimage then so it's largely impractical). If you didn't burn these when you got the system you'd be looking at purchasing them from Lenovo, which last I checked was about US$50. I have no idea how difficult it is to get that partition booting with any OTHER ...


2

Lenovo uses a custom MBR so that the thinkvantage button works properly, as Shinrai stated one way to get it working again is a reimage of the hard drive using the Lenovo recovery discs. Some brands like HP, you can mark the recovery partition as "active" and reboot, this will allow it to boot directly into the recovery partition and load recovery, this is ...


2

First step, install Vista, Windows 8 and Linux as usual. Windows 8 will install it's boot manager on the Vista partition, thus destroying the Vista bootloader. Second step, copy the C:\Boot\ directory from the Vista to the Windows 8 partition, so the Windows 8 boot loader is where it belongs. This might need to be done from within Linux or the Windows ...



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