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9

It used to be possible by reading the residual magnetism left by the previous bit. This isn't so much of an issue now that the tracks and bits that hard drives write are so small. It is almost impossible to recover any meaningful data off of a zeroed drive with modern disks. EDIT: This next section is only true for XP. Psycogeek pointed out that Vista and ...


8

First, lots of Seagate 7200.11 drives were affected by a firmware problem, which results in drive being inaccessible. This specific problem can be solved by a firmware flash, which can be done using a special cable & adapter, but it is not for the faint of heart. If you have this specific problem, you might try fixing it yourself, or maybe RMA disk to ...


7

Sounds like you've been bitten by the BSY bug (the drive event log location has been set to an invalid location by an off by one error in the firmware). This contains a reference to your model being affected. At one time, you could send the drive into Seagate and they'd revive it by updating the firmware, you'd end up paying only for shipping. Hopefully ...


7

Call a professional data recovery company and follow their instructions exactly. The more you mess with it, the more likely it becomes that you will damage any remaining data. This is not something an amateur can do. Also, check with your insurance company to see if the data recovery will be covered.


6

I observed that using the -n (no-split) option together with "-r 1" (retry once) and setting "-c" (cluster size) to a smaller value can help. My impression is that the splitting step is very slow as ddrescue splits and splits again the damaged areas. This takes a lot of time because ddrescue tries to restore very small portions of data. So, I prefer to use "...


5

what do you value most 50-100EUR/USD or your data? backup often. and for primary storage anyway use something you have a little bit of trust. disk get broken - it's a question of when, not if. bad sectors are indication that end of life is soon.


5

I just got this figured out. Under Recovery Options, select Command Prompt. Type DISKPART and press Enter. Type LIST DISK to make sure the disk is available, then select it. Type LIST PARTITION or LIST VOLUME to make sure there aren't any volumes/partitions on the drive. If there are, SELECT PARTITION # and press Enter, DELETE PARTITION/VOLUME, Enter. Then ...


5

Try testdisk. Great utility to recover your partition table and partitions.


5

To mount disks: diskutil list see your drive and note id#, then: diskutil mountDisk /dev/diskn where n is the # you id'ed in diskutil list


5

Technically ( for example for security companies with special tools), it's maybe possible to recover data. But for a normal user: No, it's not possible. Don't worry. Normal users aren't able to recover the data.


5

"Knowing the drive as I do" You don't. an I/O error is typically PRETTY bad. Just for the heck of it, I'd suggest reseating or replacing your cable. That's about the only thing short of gradual drive failure that would do this. Also take a look at the event logs to see if there's any errors there. As ramhound pointed out, smart isn't infallible It only ...


4

I have used Spinrite to save drives others have thrown out due to "bad sectors", they are still running today. Thanks for all the free drives guys. I guess it comes down to the definition of "bad sector" A sector can get marked as bad when it just cannot be read reliably anymore, spinrite fixes these issues, and they are far more common than actual bad ...


4

I know sounds bizarre, but apparently placing the drive in a freezer and cooling it down (sometimes) fixes it for long enough to pull the data off it, until it warms up at least. Consider this a last resort might work if it's a platter related issue, not if its a faulty component Seal the drive well enough to avoid moisture getting inside grab some ice-...


4

Its very complicated. Check this out. I don't know why you'd want to go through all the trouble though...


4

If your aim is to obtain the bulk of the data intact, then you could speed up its extraction. But if you really want to rescue as much data as possible, then letting ddrecue nibble at each and every is the route to take.


3

You really should re-install and just use your clone of the old drive to read of what old data that you can. There is likely to be corrupt data in the cloned image, as a result of a block not being reliably readable when you took the clone, that could be in significant OS and program files and key filesystem structures. There may be nothing of significance ...


3

Sometimes dead drives will still show up as the devices, since the connectors are still fine and the board is still fine, but one of the other physical components is broken. You could try placing the platters in another disk or paying for professional recovery, but these are probably both overkill. What was on the drive if you don't mind me asking?


3

It almost sounds to me like logical block addressing (LBA) isn't working. Back in the late Pentium era, 8GB was the limit for disk size unless the disk and BIOS supported LBA or INT 13H. I suppose if the controller is damaged the disk might failsafe to CHS mode still. Sectors are still 512 bytes, after all (unless you've got a very new drive using ...


3

Viewing the MBR, even editing it, is a very cool idea.. I don't know how you'd go about that. I may have viewed a HDD MBR before with Roadkil's sector editor but I didn't do anything with it. And I don't know of documentation on it. If somebody provides that and knows what they're talking about then that's impressive! But if you want to fix it like a mere ...


3

Actually, if the chip is hot enough for you to say it’s “hot”, and not just “warm” when you touch it, and if the platter is not even spinning, then (for all intents and purposes) it is indeed most likely dead. Maybe the circuit board has short-circuited or burned out or something, and now the platters won’t spin; that would also explain why the system cannot ...


3

I haven't done this in several years, but it used to just be finding the same model # and swapping the PCBs. It was a great trick for recovering data for users when doing hardware support. I imagine you could run into issues if the FW/PN change modified motor manipulation with respect to the platters or using different internals, but I bet that is the edge ...


3

You can try something like this: mount /dev/disk1s10 And replace disk1s10 with the identifier of your drive.


3

If your device is not being recognized by the system, that might indicate a bad controller. That's good, because it means your data is likely still safe on the disks themselves. But it's also bad, because you'll need to use a data recovery firm that can replace the controller in a clean room environment. But at least there is a relatively high chance of ...


3

This sounds a lot like you have a damaged hard drive, which is probably what caused the corruption in the first place. When a program tries to read a bad sector on a disk, it will fail, causing the disk to attempt to read it again. If the application is not designed to time out the reads and move on, they can get stuck forever. Because very few programs, ...


3

It's worth noting that this could be a problem with the computer itself, or the cable you're using, or even the power connection. Try swapping all those things around and see if you can get this to work on another system with differing configuration. If it's not detected at all after all that, there's almost certainly something wrong with the controller ...


3

This is expected behaviour of ddrescue. It slows down to read smaller chunks in damaged areas of the disk. Given that your drive is in the freezer, I assume it's in trouble and you're trying to salvage information. Ddrescue is the tool I'd use in that situation. From the manual The algorithm of ddrescue is as follows (the user may interrupt the ...


3

It could be (assuming the drive isn't physically damaged) the partition table is corrupt. You can use TestDisk to fix this, as well as recover partitions and files. Documentation examples: Step by step Data recovery examples Explanation of program options


3

Windows dosen't really have the fun disk imaging tools - I'd boot into a linux livecd (I prefer ubuntu), install the gnu ddrescue (not to be confused with the other sort), and use that to image the drive. ddrescue should handle any errors it comes across, recover as much as it can on a first pass, and then try again for the stuff it missed. This is a ...


3

The hibernated data has dependencies upon the hardware installed at the time the hibernation occurred - there's no getting around that.


3

The old system probably has a very small hard drive, so why not make a copy of the entire drive as virtual drive image, and then run that system on another modern machine as a virtual PC? You can do it this way: Attach the old drive to some modern machine that has the same drive connection (EIDE? maybe not so easy to find). Use Microsoft SystemInternals ...



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