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Remove Main Partition (C:) and make other Parition (D:) the main Now I want to keep windows 10 and remove 8 (on C:) but I can't delete the partition because there are boot files and paging on (C:). Use the below instructions with gparted to set the Window 10 partition as the active boot partition, confirm that it reboots properly as you would expect,...


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…HDDs consume ~6 times less power when not spinning… That’s one of those “truthy” facts. Even if your ideas could even be implemented on a practical level, how much power would be used to get the non-spinning hard drive up and spinning again? This is along the same lines as people who put systems to sleep at night versus people who power down machines at ...


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Grab something like WinDirStat. Anything taking up 16 GB as a single file or as a folder should stand out fairly readily.


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With Write Caching, the OS buffers write requests as it wants, without you knowing, and will do them at its leisure at any time later - could be milliseconds, could be minutes later. So when you write a file to this disk, some or all pieces might not be written, and some or all pieces of the directory and the file allocation tables might not be written ...


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Yes you should. I'd actually suggest avoiding using the disk further except to back up. Modern disks are really good at handling small amounts of damage - reallocated sectors tend to mean "a sector was bad but we've managed to get the data elsewhere" That said "it depends", A 320gb disk is usually older, and well, you're hitting the point where preventive ...


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That is most certannly possible to do, and on that board also. You have 6 SATA ports, plus the express ports (shared with M2). It is also common—and somewhat smart to form—2 seperate arrays when doing (for example) 4 hard disks, because copying from/to utilizes 2 seperate sets of hardware storage, instead of doing “I-While-O” doing input and output from the ...


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As myself and SuperSoph_WD have said, there really is not much you can do at this point. Certain third party tools like Recuva or MiniTool Partition Wizard could help, but there are a few catches. The drive could be unreadable in its current state, and as such, you would likely be wasting your time trying. SuperSoph_WD said it; you will likely do more ...


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If the BIOS can't see the drive at all, you probably have a bad drive or a bad connection. Try disconnecting your current boot drive (SSD), both power and data cables, without disconnecting the cables on the motherboard/power supply side (obviously, do this with the computer shut down and the power disconnected). Then, try connecting the new drive using the ...


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Most BIOS/UEFI menus have something buried in there to disable/enable individual hard drives or SATA controllers. The OS cannot see this hardware when it's hidden in this way. What this option is called (and whether it exists) varies by manufacturer and BIOS/UEFI vendor, so it's probably best just to carefully look at all the menu options and look for a ...


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I played with various options. I cut out a piece of the plastic (from the plastic dummy drive) but it wouldn't fit. I evaluated Techie007's response but don't have the tools required. So I ended up with a very low level solution which is to place a small screw between the caddy and the metal frame of the bay: This seems to provide sufficient resistance ...


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While your second drive may not be showing obviously problems, it may still be what's causing your disk problems, by polluting the bus. Try leaving the 2nd drive unhooked, and see if things behave. :)



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