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78

No, hard drives are in sealed enclosures and these images are marketing shots to give you an idea of the engineering inside.


26

@Paul is absolutely correct. Hard drives need to be enclosed (I'd say sealed, except they are not quite sealed - but the tiny area which is not sealed is behind a heavy filter). It makes sense that drives need to be sealed when you realise how they work. The drive head floats very slightly above the platter to read the information. The thing is that that ...


23

Comparing the TigerDirect page for a Seagate ST2000DM001 to the Amazon page for the ST2000DM001, we see that the TigerDirect page includes a few more pictures for that exact model number. One of the pictures shows the drive with the case on. This suggests that the other 3 stores you checked just decided, for whatever reason, not to show the product as ...


13

It's marketing. A hard drive cover is boring; the internals look impressive. This isn't a new concept, for example this Intel processor doesn't actually have a semi-translucent heat spreader:


9

For display purposes only. The read-write heads move across the disk, flying on a thin film of air about 3-7 millionths of an inch thick. Finger prints and the finest dust will bridge this, causing a head crash. A human hair is a mountain in size in comparison at about 0.5-6 thousandths of an inch Most drives available have a sealed container with a ...


5

As fixer1234 said in his comment, you can use any hard drive from any manufacturer. However, there are a few things to consider: You must get a SATA disk, this will ensure your computer has the right plug and interface for connecting it You need to get a 3.5" hard disk, this will ensure the hard disk fits inside your computer case without the need for ...


5

Simply removing the HDD to remove the data shouldn't void the warranty. Get a HDD to USB adaptor, they're worth their weight in gold.


3

You can safely buy any other hard drive assuming that it uses the same connection type (SATA is the most common these days) has the same platter size or less (you can fit a 2.5" SSD where a 3.5" HDD used to be, but you're going to need a mount for it) has the same outside dimensions (mostly just an issue for SSDs which may be smaller than the 2.5" drives ...


3

Yes, it might be the reason for a slow response on your computer. By default the page file resides on the C: drive and since the free space is less it imposes certain restrictions on the storage location of new files. Hence the computer becomes slow. There is an impending danger of losing your hard disk if you do not keep ample free space. I had a similar ...


2

There may be a partition alignment problem with your hard drive. Your WD6400AARS is an Advanced Media Format drive that uses 4K sector sizes. If your OS partition is not properly aligned on this 4K boundary it will lead to much slower than expected disk drive performance due to a process of translation the drive must perform. Western Digital offers for ...


2

I think you'll be fine to delete the 100 MB partition on your Hard disk, which holds the K: drive. However, in order to make sure, I would go about it this way: Shut down the PC. Unplug the power cable after it shuts down Open the case, and then unplug your HDD, which holds the K: drive so that only your SSD is connected to the system Reconnect power ...


2

Hard disks are assembled in a clean room environment - one that is entirely dust free. This is because any small particles floating around inside the container can cause damage. It is unlikely that you would be able to create a clean enough environment in a domestic or office environment. This effectively eliminates any useful DIY remedies. Your options ...


2

On another machine, make a bootable CD/DVD or a bootable USB drive and boot with it. Try these guides: Knoppix Ubuntu USB Stick


1

I had the same problem, and I did everything that the others suggested to fix it, but nothing worked. Finally, my hard disk stopped spinning at 100% after I changed the power options and turned off the hard disk after more than 3 hours. Depending on how long your computer stays idle, you could try to make it 60 minutes. My simple thought was that the ...


1

If the laptop only provides SATA II with 3Gb/s, the values you see in AS SSD Benchmark are fine. You can't improve this.


1

After hours of continuing to dig through forums, I finally found the culprit. For some reason, my SSD caching was causing the problem. I have no idea why this would be, and why the problem would occur only sporadically, but disabling SSD caching appears to have had an immediate and dramatic effect.


1

The hard drive is failing. The SMART report values are out of norms for a healthy hard drive. I recommend replacing the hard drive immediately. A hard drive with read / write problems can make any operating system very sluggish.


1

Your #197 attribute of 19 pending sectors indicates that the drive has a hardware problem that is has been unable to resolve. The standard HDAT2 Read and repair bad sectors should fix that. However any number >2 is grim. These unhandled errors are usually disk surface related. I suggest that Ubuntu is OK because it is in a clear (healthy) area of the disk. ...


1

Wikipedia's list of known SMART attributes lists 0xB8 as End-to-End error / IOEDC described as: This attribute is a part of Hewlett-Packard's SMART IV technology, as well as part of other vendors' IO Error Detection and Correction schemas, and it contains a count of parity errors which occur in the data path to the media via the drive's cache RAM. (I ...


1

if it was one bad sector do I need to replace it, and do this mean that the rest of the hard drive will be corrupted? Michael Kjörling's answer on this SU question covers this very well, so I'll just snag his text as it directly applies: Bad sectors (especially when you see more and more of them quickly) are a very good sign that your computer's hard ...


1

Since you have no system restore points and it is recommended by Nvidia to do a "system restore" then run the windows restore located on your restoration partition. Moving the drives from one slot to another won't make any difference since during the reinstall, it will ask you to select the appropriate drive anyways. When it does ask, make sure you pick ...


1

It's not the boot-loader: you need to change the disc order in the BIOS. Depending on how you did your install you may have to make the new disc bootable, either through the install disc, or one of the many boot utilities available.


1

That's because harddisks use "zone density recording". In plain words: there is more data on one rotation on the outside of the disk than on the inside. With a constant speed, a disk gives you more data on the outside (left side of your graph) than on the inside. See this excellent link. I quote: An interesting added benefit from zoned bit recording is ...


1

You might want to try defragmenting system files like the page file and MFT at boot time. Defraggler offers this option; it will run when you reboot your computer, on a text-mode screen before the Windows lock screen comes up. You can access this functionality under Boot Time Defrag in the Settings menu. I've done this before and it successfully defragmented ...



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