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You can take a look at the Link Speed under the Intel 5 Series Chipset section. SATA levels are named after a number (1, 2, 3) and also for their speeds. SATA 1.0 is known as SATA 1.5Gb/s SATA 2.0 is known as SATA 3.0Gb/s === You're computer supports SATA 2.0 SATA 3.0 is known as SATA 6.0Gb/s "Link speeds are the theoretical maximum speed at which data ...


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Download Gparted or Aomei. Move your G, F and E partitions across your unallocated space. Now your unallocated space will be next to your C partition. After this you may be able to extend C partition either by the downloaded 3rd party or your disk manager.


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What happens if you try the following: mkdir /mnt/md1 mount /dev/md1 /mnt/md1 mkdir /mnt/md2 mount /dev/md2 /mnt/md2 ? This will create empty folders to use as mount points and try to mount the raid filesystems if it can cleanly mount them (if it has any issues trying to mount them, then it will report the error and leave the drives untouched). If ...


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The issue with cloning between solid state and mechanical drives is that they don't exactly store data in the same manner. If you want to clone the drive properly, you'll need a tool such as CloneZilla or Paragon. Other things to think about: When the clone is complete, remove the SSD and plug the HDD into it's sata socket. You may need a copy of ...


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You probably have partitioning problems due to the way that HDDs and SSDs store data. I've seen cloning tools mess up when you use two different types of disks. I suggest you first compare partition tables of your disks using Diskpart. Attach both disks to your computer and boot from the one that works. If this is not possible you can attach the other one ...


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Use CloneZilla LiveCD and a large USB hard disk. CloneZilla is capable of copying using various methods for different filesystems. If you are unsure then you can use CloneZilla to "dd" to make a bit-by-bit copy of your entire hard disk (including boot sectors). Note: "dd" is not part of CloneZilla but it uses it as a "last attempt" method of backing up a ...


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Use either mhdd or buy a copy of Spinrite. You will not have to clone anything it will scan and repair the surface as is. Spinrite is the better product, but it cost money.


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There has been a lot of disambiguation about running things like CCleaner and Defrag on an SSD. Running constant sequential writes can in theory shorten the life expectancy of an SSD. However you're only loosing days off of an life expectancy of years. The drive will outlast your use of it for sure. The thing about Defrag is it won't speed up your drive in ...


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One precaution you should take is to backup as normal Alex. That is not to say SSDs are unreliable. Far from it. I've personally deployed and supported lots of PCs and laptops for many years and I have to say that SSDs are a joy to work with in comparison to the traditional spinning hard disks. I've yet to see an SSD fail. Speaking to several laptop ...


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If you care about your SSD life time then you need to be aware that due to limited write/erase cycles number per sector the device may start dying after a few years of serious usage. From this perspective it is recommended to put the most rewritable data on the HDD. OS will run much faster being placed on SSD, of course, but OS itself has files that are ...


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If the device is not listed in the BIOS interface error has probably occurred. The interface board attached to the HD has possibly failed and will not initialize when the Disk Controller starts polling for hardware. I am assuming from your post that there is another drive present and can be seen so the channel that drive is assigned (physically of by round ...


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Maybe you could use HJSplit to transfer your files to several floppies. I also would recommend using Borland C 3.1 compiler, fairly easy to use (I assume you are not doing anything too fancy on DOS), just google for it, it is in lots of places as bc31.rar


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Fedora 13 was released on 2010-05-25 - more than 4 years ago. If you replaced hardware (motherboard, CPU, memory) without upgrading OS, most likely old kernel 2.6.33 cannot properly support new hardware - SATA chip, NIC, etc that are present in your new computer. In other words, you should really install more recent version of Linux (Fedora 20 or Ubuntu ...


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It sounds like some sort of corruption. First try accessing it from cmd: dir e:\ If this doesn't do anything meaningful, check for error messages during boot-up. If booting is error-free, right-click on My Computer, then select Manage and in the box that comes up Disk Management. If the E: partition shows as healthy, right-click on it, select ...


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It really supports any SATA version I, II, or III. The SATA drives and are backwards compatible. If the drive is SATA III and your MB Pro is SATA II, the dive will perform at the theoretical levels of a SATA II drive. Same for SATA I.



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