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1

I found a solution that worked for me. Try using a powered USB hub device, that is, a hub that comes with AC power plug, not simply USB-powered. Problem solved.


12

You may not be able to fit specific other drives, depending on the space available. It's also not impossible that other hard drives may run hotter than the Dell is specced to handle and this may affect the drive's life. But that's a stretch. Really, though, the vendors are either incompetent or are lying to you. The following comment was left by Ben Voigt ...


0

No. Partitions are defined by the partition table, and the partition table is permanently stored on the drive just like any other file. Merging of two partitions indicates a change to the partition table. Possibilities include: Did something change it? Could you have contracted a virus or the like? Any reason to suspect that the drive might be bad? Did you ...


1

The outer tracks are usually faster. Whether or not this corresponds to how partitioning software visualises the table is another matter. Performance benefits depend on use. I would want to move my Windows System partition away from beggining of disk to make space for data volumes from which I stream media in real-time software, because real-time streaming ...


0

Well, I did this on my external hard disk, that is, installed ubuntu. To stay away from all the mess that is going to happen with the grub/bootloader of your current primary hard disk follow these steps: Make your USB flash drive bootable by putting that OS in that USB flash drive (you are familiar with unetbootin) Create separate partition(s) for your new ...


1

Hard drive manufacturers market drives in terms of decimal (base 10) capacity. In decimal notation, one megabyte (MB) is equal to 1,000,000 bytes, one gigabyte (GB) is equal to 1,000,000,000 bytes, and one terabyte (TB) is equal to 1,000,000,000,000 bytes. Programs such as FDISK, system BIOS, Windows, and MacOS use the binary (base 2) numbering system. In ...


1

For the disconnected drive, for those who have SQL Server Management Studio in your pc, just run this query. Exec master.dbo.xp_cmdshell 'net use x: /delete' ** change the 'x' according to the drive name.. ** not sure if it will work with other database.. ** if your xp_cmdshell is not working or inactive, and this error occurs: " SQL Server blocked ...


0

I think that your problem is basically how to turn off journaling without using OSX. This requires the binary editing (hacking) of the disk header, and as a result the disk space taken up by the journal will probably be lost. Here are pointers to two rather similar C programs that claim to do just that : Program 1 Program 2 I cannot guarantee that ...


0

If you did not run WinDirStat as admin, it would only be able to report on space used by files that it is allowed to see. Run it again as administrator, and it should start showing you the total picture of where the space has gone.


-1

This will decrease metadata size. sudo btrfs balance start -v -musage=0 /path


2

I've had this problem in older computers when using the on-board audio, and also know what the movement of the mouse or a file read sounds like. The problem is some sort of electrical noise that leaks into the sound outputs. Newer motherboards have seemed to solve this problem (I assume by using higher quality parts), but rather than replacing your ...


1

I have just successfully dealt with this very same issue with this particular motherboard. In my case this situation was caused by a faulty RAM stick. Υou will need to determine which hardware part is causing the problem in your case but before we get there, let me first explain what's going on. The reason you get no video output is because the POST ...


0

If the old computer is reasonably recent (like, last ten years or so), then this should not be a problem at all. The critical issue is the host interconnect for the hard drive; over the last decade, SATA has virtually all but replaced its predecessor PATA (IDE). If the hard drive from the old system is a SATA drive, then you should just be able to ...


3

So what is taking up all this space? System restore. I was able to determine this by loading the drive through another computer and viewing hidden/system files. In my case System Restore was currently configured to consume 50% of the storage space of the drive, thus this massive System Volume Information folder. To reconfigure, [Right Click]Computer --> ...


2

The most common cause of a buzzing drive is the mounting. Depending on whether this is a laptop or desktop. Certainly this is true of desktops & servers. You can fix this by getting some plastic washers and adding them between the HDD and the mounting. You can also get dedicated drive noise dampening kits. Options are more limited in a laptop and I've ...


2

As per the discussion in the comments above, the suggested solution is to add a drive letter to the drives, and if that doesn't work, to delete all existing partitions, re-partition and reformat the drives as NTFS via Disk Management. Since one of the drives might have a HFS/HFS+ Mac partition, the latter would be required anyway.


2

Something like Acronis Universal Restore might help in this case: Acronis Universal Restore is the unique technology developed in Acronis that allows changing Windows Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL.dll) and device drivers. It is designed to allow a machine to boot its operating system initially after a restoration/deployment of an image to ...


0

Scanning a HDD continuously/ is what some anti-virus programs and even operating systems already do. Additionally also "outside partitions" which is snart as that is one good place for viruses. (as are unused sectors inside partition, MFT tables,etc,etc) Typically this starts after Computer has been idle for a while, for example middle of night, If either ...


0

Scanning a HDD continuously or often reading/writing at bad sectors may cause the bad sectors to propagate./ Or could make the little magnets get better, taking them out of their hysteresis-lock or maybe the write head is getting weak, replacing old good magnets with weak new ones. or maybe the defects just grow by themselves But obviously if the head ...


1

HDD SPARE SECTORS! Seems everyone forgets that HDDs have spare sectors. The HDD replaces bad sectors with these, but only when the bad sector is written to! Also, the HDD itself decides on what sector is "bad", unreadable correctly. That is, sectors have checksums so HDD firmware can detect "bad" sectors. (or more complex error checking mechanisms) ...


0

Try using Robocopy or XCOPY I would suggest for robocopy as it is a bit better than xcopy in certain cases


0

Option 1 (simplest) Delete extended partition using GParted or similar utility from a Linux/Windows LiveCD/USB (such as Hiren's), then install XP into unallocated space and it will create a primary partition and do the rest. Option 2 (a bit harder) XP onwards requires a primary active boot partition, but has no problems being installed to or running from ...


1

Here are the steps you need to take to rescue your files; Download GParted and burn it on a CD or DVD Boot from disk, select default start option and when it asks you which mode you prefer, press 2 for the command-line Type sudo fdisk -l to see a list of your partitions, lets say you have /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 as your primary partitions and /dev/sda5 as ...


3

Let this be a lesson to you. XP (as well as every version of Windows forward of XP) requires a primary partition to install, you tried to install it on a logical/never-going-to-be-bootable partition. either use the primary partition to install XP, or find a way such as a linux live CD to convert the logical partition into a primary partition.


2

As we found out in the comments, there are two possible problems at hand here: You are trying to run the copy as a regular user. This may cause reading the source files to fail because you don't have read permissions to them. This is easily corrected by running the copying through sudo just like you did the mount. You get cp: omitting directory Documents/ ...


0

You could do this in Windows 98, and as long as the machine would boot with the same drivers already installed for the previous hardware, it would run and let you install any drivers needed for the new hardware. Since XP (probably NT 4.0, but I have no direct experience with that version), if Windows detects a "significant" hardware change on startup, it'll ...


0

Yes, you are going to have to reinstall Windows, as it has noticed a change in the motherboard and the Windows 7 license key is tied to the original motherboard.


0

So I flashed the bios by booting from a sd card in the memory card slot. It still doesn't see hard drive in the bios, and I've verified that the hard drive is working properly, so my conclusion is that the hard drive controller, or the internal sata connector are bad. However, ubuntu can be installed on an sd card, so that'll be the solution to keep using ...


0

MS has directions to dismount a HD (windows 7, but also applies to Windows 8): launch the Computer Management CPL applet; on the left, select Storage and Disk Management; right-click the drive to remove and select Change Drive Letter and Paths; finally select Remove. Caveat: Though this will dismount the drive, it depends on the HD firmware to spin down, ...


1

Apparently this has been a problem for more than 3 years. Google Drive gets installed on a FAT32 partition but the folder needs to be only on an NTFS partition. So dumb that the installer doesn't abort or at the very least complain if no NTFS drives are found in the system.


0

I'm guessing your LaCie's SATA to USB/FireWire bridge has a proprietary password protection mechanism. Probably not full disk encryption, but just a password lock that keeps the bridge chip from allowing the drive to be mounted without successful password authentication first. Since LaCie hasn't kept their proprietary software up to date to run on modern ...


0

I decided to share this. Open a cmd prompt window, I typed chkdsk x: /f where x is the letter name assigned to drive, waited for 10 secs and loh, it works! Yippie!


0

I was able to get this to work only after I converted the new disk to GPT and Dynamic. These modes are new to me (i've only been using PCs since '82 ;-)), but they seem to be needed and not implemented automatically by the Restore. Use Diskpart Convert to do this. I think you can check the modes of your old disk to know how to match the new one. You'll ...


1

Between them, AFH and Romeo Ninov basically have the answer, but it needs to be bundled together. Your /boot partition is separate because this is essentially required for use of LVM (which is not a filesystem, but a container for logical volumes, which themselves contain filesystems). An LVM partition can be resized; see here for an outline of what's ...


1

I find the results from gparted and df differ, but not to this extent: I suspect gparted is misinterpreting your lvm2 contents. Your problem is that /boot is mounted on a separate, 0.25GB drive, and this is what is running out of space. I'm not sure how you got into this state, or how to get out of it: perhaps grub doesn't boot very well from lvm2 ...


0

Edit: resize2fs didn't work. Try "resize2fs /dev/sda9" in a terminal. Or you can install and use gparted to edit your partitions. I think This Post is what you are looking for. Gparted is going to be the best tool to use. The Gparted manual should get you started feeling comfortable using it.


1

Because on the screen you see PV (physical volume), not filesystem. And entire pv is assigned to vg. Executing df you will see the status of filesystem


0

Looks like they are checking the size of the HDD, so your can't use it. Either they are creating their own partitions and reject big drives. Or they are just using the first partition and decided users are stupid and it's not worth the trouble to check if the created partition could work.


0

Copy all files from E: to another Disk with the boot CD system, format the partition E: and copy it back to the newly formatted partition. Try to boot to your main OS and it should be fixed. Had the same problem once and this method worked pretty well.


3

Instead of manually trying to figure this out, rely on existing stuff. I use hd-idle on my file server, it works great. I also don’t unmount my drives because there’s really no reason to do so. If I want to access a file, the disks will spin up. Then, after the timeout passes, they’ll spin down again. If you’re super paranoid about data integrity, you can ...


3

I think the problem is not really about computers or hard disks, if it is asked like in the exam question. It is more about basics. If you have 7200 RPM, that means the disk will rotate (7200/60) = 120 times per second Each time the disk does a whole rotation, you are theoretically able to read 1 complete track. That means reading 1 track takes (1/120)s ...


6

It’s a command the host sends to the drive. In your regular PC, power is supplied directly from the PSU. It’s supplied as long as the PC is on, whether or not the drive is in standby. This is necessary because if the drive were to shut down completely, you would not be able to access it again.


0

See here for a table. The take home summary is: Magnetic data and cassette tapes: 10-20 years Nintendo Cartridge: up to 10 years Floppy Disk: 10-20 years CDs and DVDs: 5-10 unrecorded 2-5 recorded Blu-Ray: Not certain, probably over 2-5 recorded M-Disc: 1,000 years (theoretically) Hard Disk: 3-5 years Flash Storage: Depends on write cycles, ...


1

I still use a 13Gb disk from 1999 for storage of stufff that i don't need to access very often, and it works like a charm. I too have it in a USB case. No special considerations to take, just be aware that drives weren't as robust as they are now when it comes to rough handling.


1

Nope. Power it up. It's not like there's a bike chain in there you need to grease. If it doesn't just work you could try the freezer trick. Other than that, unless there's data on there you really need, I'd just toss it if it didn't work the first time. http://lifehacker.com/5515337/save-a-failed-hard-drive-in-your-freezer-redux


2

First, diagnose which component. Method 1: Remove the hard drive. Power on the laptop. Do you hear the sound? Method 2: Use diagnostics software (often provided by the manufacturer) to stress the CPU or HDD, which may trigger the sound. Second, replace the component. Manufacturer's support sites sometimes provide documentation to replace certain ...


0

That was it. Another Evil Seagate drive coughing up blood. Ran fsck on it and 10 min later it was bad again... That's 4 bad Seagate drives in the past year! It would be nice if ExtFS could be a bit more obvious with the error. Instead, it just refuses to mount any of the drives. But at least I know how to fix it... I don't think the problem is related to ...


0

You are forgetting at least one disk access: The directory entry of the file has an access time, so each read, even though the file itself is in the cache, means the directory has to be updated. But, to be honest, this question cannot be answered easily, without knowing a lot of pre-conditions. The 'possible' disk accesses depend on many factors, probably ...


0

@ n0noob, While GPT is highly recommended for ease and "future proofing" your install you can still use MBR. Windows 8/8.1 migration IS NOT Required in either of the following setups.. Gonna make the following assumptions: -- Laptop is at least 4 years old OR newer which means it is EFI capable -- Not all of Drives D:\ and/or E:\ are full ---or are ...


0

The POST beeps are designed to check if things are working before an operating system is loaded. If you're getting no beeps then it's not even getting that far. No beeps are usually caused by one of two things (a dead motherboard or a corrupted BIOS) and 99 times out of 100 the solution is to replace the motherboard itself. As you've already unplugged and ...



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