New answers tagged

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The Windows "Disk Management" tool diskmgmt.msc can shrink and grow partitions, although I'm not sure if it can grow the "system" partition specifically. (Also, it cannot move partitions, only extend them into free space "to the right".) You can download GParted Live or Ubuntu (which comes with GParted), boot it off a CD or USB, and use it to move and/or ...


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EaseUS Partition Master Free can do this, and is a reliable free tool which can resize partitions on-the-fly, while running Windows, without any need to reboot. It can resize "basic" volumes and it doesn't matter if the disk space is on the "left" or "right" side of the partition.


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I had the same problem. Same configuration (but other hard disk), same behaviour. My soulution was to avoid the standby mode for the hard disk.


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As myself and SuperSoph_WD have said, there really is not much you can do at this point. Certain third party tools like Recuva or MiniTool Partition Wizard could help, but there are a few catches. The drive could be unreadable in its current state, and as such, you would likely be wasting your time trying. SuperSoph_WD said it; you will likely do more ...


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The name you see on Google Drive web version is not the actual file name. It's stored on the server with a different filename which is unique. If you download a folder from Google Drive as ZIP which has multiple files with the same name, when you open the ZIP archive, you'll see the individual files numbered like this: SomeFile SomeFile(2) SomeFile(3) ... ...


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With Write Caching, the OS buffers write requests as it wants, without you knowing, and will do them at its leisure at any time later - could be milliseconds, could be minutes later. So when you write a file to this disk, some or all pieces might not be written, and some or all pieces of the directory and the file allocation tables might not be written ...


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Yes for 1 and 2. Keep in mind , booting off of 256GB 4*Drive PCIe x16 M.2 Solid State Drive Card is very fast but takes up four of your PCIe lanes. so you need to consider other cards that need PCIe lanes and the number of lanes your Mobo and processor support.


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will my RAID array work on the new mainboard without any formatting? It depends on how the RAID was setup and on the motherboards. In you case I an assuming that you used Intel fake RAID (IRST)and the motherboards have the same technology. So yes, in this case it should just work. This is not always the case. E.g. if you had an old hardware RAID card then ...


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RAID information for RAID arrays made with on-board desktop MB controllers is kept in the HDDs themselves, so the answer is YES, the RAID will be detected on another MB, given some conditions are met: RAID mode is enabled in the BIOS, boot mode is the same (i.e. not switched to EFI) and there is no known incompatibility between RAID controllers (this should ...


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Yes you should. I'd actually suggest avoiding using the disk further except to back up. Modern disks are really good at handling small amounts of damage - reallocated sectors tend to mean "a sector was bad but we've managed to get the data elsewhere" That said "it depends", A 320gb disk is usually older, and well, you're hitting the point where preventive ...


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It could well be your Windows 10 upgrade. Even though you probably declined the upgrade, Microsoft will download it anyway ('so you have it when you want it'). The already recommended procedures will help you to identify the files' location. There is little sense in simply deleting them though, as Windows will just download them again for you (how nice of ...


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Grab something like WinDirStat. Anything taking up 16 GB as a single file or as a folder should stand out fairly readily.


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It says you had a 100 sector reallocation which is replacing 100 bad sectors with spare sectors. This is a hardware problem, and can not be repaired. The drive is getting old, and will die soon than later. The slow down means your hard drive is probably doing at lot of error correcting, and is a bad sign. You might be able to take some temporary measure, ...


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I would recommend to split the SSD into two pieces, one of it large enough for only the OS and whatever must go on C:. [I have about 15 GB used there, so making it 40 GB is probably a good size, with some spare]. This way you can fully use the remainder for other things. For the non-SSD, I would see no need to partition in any way - except if you want to ...


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No, you shouldn't split the SSD, nor the HDD. (It doesnt really matter) If you install Windows 10 on the SSD, the remaining data of the SSD will be still available. You can use the HDD for the rest of your programs and data. That's what I would do. If you want to resize the partition I don't think there will be any major problem. Just keep in mind that ...


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Can't comment, so have to provide an answer. I have a similar situation on a Lenovo laptop. I replaced the optical drive with an SSD. The computer boots fine with a single a drive plugged into either cable location, but if two non-optical drives are plugged in at the same time it ends up in a boot loop. In Lenovo's case it's a known limitation of their BIOS....


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I know you specifically mentioned doing this through UEFI, but it's worth at least mentioning that this can also be done by taking the disk offline in Windows or removing the letter from the partition, since the OP mentioned having it not display in My PC. Both are done by running the Computer Management program, and selecting Disk Management. To remove a ...


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Keep in mind that different implementations such as on your "IBM Server" may act differently. Without knowing the exact model of your server there's no guarantee the controller will work exactly like this. As a rule you want to keep the same size and model of disk within a RAID 5 array. Your controller should allow a 1TB drive to be added, but it's only ...


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On windows, you can use smartmontools, which for years can see smart attributes and run tests on individual drives, even if they are members of intel fake-raid. The easiest installer is at http://www.netpower.fr/smartmontools-win which lets you setup email warnings, pop-ups, etc.


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If the BIOS can't see the drive at all, you probably have a bad drive or a bad connection. Try disconnecting your current boot drive (SSD), both power and data cables, without disconnecting the cables on the motherboard/power supply side (obviously, do this with the computer shut down and the power disconnected). Then, try connecting the new drive using the ...


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As LawrenceC mentioned, BIOS usually has a disable button for HDDs. On the other hand, if you are looking to hide specific Disk Drives, you can do so through the following. Windows KeyR → regedit → Hit OK. Make a backup through File → Export. Goto HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE → Software → Microsoft → Windows → CurrentVersion → ...


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Most BIOS/UEFI menus have something buried in there to disable/enable individual hard drives or SATA controllers. The OS cannot see this hardware when it's hidden in this way. What this option is called (and whether it exists) varies by manufacturer and BIOS/UEFI vendor, so it's probably best just to carefully look at all the menu options and look for a ...


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I got it to work with two options enabled: -icds and -k1. For some reason, Clonezilla gave me the same error with only -icds enabled.


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This hard drive seems like it was somewhat corrupted, but you might want to gather more evidence that it is "dead." You are getting a PXE-E61 error because your computer is booting to PXE/network boot. Make sure that network boot is disabled. If it is already at the bottom of the boot order, this shows that the hard drive is not bootable. The Diskpart ...


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I also have an ASUS M51AC PC, and I have done exactly what you were asking, which is to clone additional drives as backups, so that you can plug one in, at a moment's notice, in case of drive failure. In fact, I have done it many times over the past two years and always have a fresh install hard drive and an updated hard drive (with all programs installed, ...


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Since you're having similar issues with another hard disk, I think it's safe to assume that the problem is something else. If you changed any BIOS setting, it might be a good idea to reset BIOS settings to their defaults to see if it solves your problem. Otherwise you'll need to figure out which other hardware component is failing, causing this ...


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That is most certannly possible to do, and on that board also. You have 6 SATA ports, plus the express ports (shared with M2). It is also common—and somewhat smart to form—2 seperate arrays when doing (for example) 4 hard disks, because copying from/to utilizes 2 seperate sets of hardware storage, instead of doing “I-While-O” doing input and output from the ...


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Remove Main Partition (C:) and make other Parition (D:) the main Now I want to keep windows 10 and remove 8 (on C:) but I can't delete the partition because there are boot files and paging on (C:). Use the below instructions with gparted to set the Window 10 partition as the active boot partition, confirm that it reboots properly as you would expect,...


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You can use the free dd utility present in pretty much every Unixoid system (eg. All Macs, Unixes, Linuxes, ...). I'd suggest booting a live image like Ubuntu and procceed like this: Then enter a terminal and obtain root privileges if you're not already root: sudo -s. List all devices connected to the system using lsblk. The output will show you a list ...


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What you are hearing is the hard drive's head moving. Some drives are louder than others, however it could also be a sign of mechanical failure. I would replace the drive just to be safe but if you choose to take the risk then make sure you backup what you'd hate to lose forever. If the head breaks then your data is going to be near impossible to retrieve ...


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Tool for writing zeroes to HDD that ignores write errors Does anybody know of a open-source or free windows tool that explicitly offers the option of ignoring write errors? SDELETE Use SDELETE and use the applicable syntax (one example below) to suffice for your need; the -q switch is for quiet mode and suppresses errors. SDELETE -p 1 -s -q D:\ ...


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I played with various options. I cut out a piece of the plastic (from the plastic dummy drive) but it wouldn't fit. I evaluated Techie007's response but don't have the tools required. So I ended up with a very low level solution which is to place a small screw between the caddy and the metal frame of the bay: This seems to provide sufficient resistance ...


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There is no difference between these two folders. Both are same. Thanks


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…HDDs consume ~6 times less power when not spinning… That’s one of those “truthy” facts. Even if your ideas could even be implemented on a practical level, how much power would be used to get the non-spinning hard drive up and spinning again? This is along the same lines as people who put systems to sleep at night versus people who power down machines at ...


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While your second drive may not be showing obviously problems, it may still be what's causing your disk problems, by polluting the bus. Try leaving the 2nd drive unhooked, and see if things behave. :)


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It sounds like one of the bearings in something is a bit off. If that's a Mac, you should have them take a look at it as I believe they're supposed to have SSD drives in them. More than likely it's one of the fans or something.


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The sound is normal (it the read/write head assembly movement) though typically not that audible in modern drives. This sound was common in earlier drives (circa 20th century) and of course non-existent in SSD drives which have no moving parts.


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Fluctuations of a few MB would be consistent with temp files / caches and should generally be nothing to worry about. Do you have Windows auto update itself? Downloading the update will take space. When if you have it configured to manually trigger the update it may be downloading those files in the background Do you use a web browser on that computer. If ...


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Both of the previous answers (by Hennes and Moses) get some parts right and some parts wrong. Here's the correct set of answers: To elaborate on what Hennes wrote, MBR is limited to partitions of 2^32 - 1 (that is, 4,294,967,295) sectors that start no later than the same value (counting starting from 0). Given a sector size of 512 bytes, this works out to ...


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I propose a quick workaround: to move a whole directory with a lot of data from the jammed partition to the empty one, then to create a link to that directory in place of the original one. In your case, let's suppose you have a big storage data DirWith40GB and its subdirectory. From the shell you can mv /home/user/DirWith40GB /mnt/vbd/Dir2 cd /home/user ...


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Ok, so I found out that the computer had a virus and destroyed most of the data therefore not worth backing up. I reinstalled the OS and it did work.


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If you can boot a Linux system from (USB/CD) I would use the comands fdisk, dd and ntfresize to do the job manually: use fdisk to create a new partition of the unallocated space use dd to copy the windows partion into the new one again fdisk to remove the old windows and the new partion, and re-create the new one with the same number of the old windows ...


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So turns out the SSD was faulty, I borrowed another SSD and installed to that with no problems at all, same capacity just a Crucial instead of Kingston. The Kingston has been returned and refunded and I kept the Crucial instead. I wish I knew a way to have checked this during installation but I'm guessing it's something to do with the firmware on the unit ...


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Today, I was looking at this question and it's comments. I found out that removing ntfs-3g from a live USB of Ubuntu 16.4 allowed me to access my 500gb Windows drive which was not working before with gparted while it was installed. I don't know what fixed it, but it's now working fine. Sorry if I missed anything, this is my first post here.


1

I think you should re-evaluate what it is your trying to achieve. Because I can assure you, that the solution does not involve a second "hidden" hard drive. If your determined to go this route, and I don't see why you would be... I'd look into IDE ribbon cable switches. Make it a physical switch in the back of the desktop case. Look up IDE cable select, ...


2

Drill a small small hole in the caddy near where lock screw hole on the chassis is, then tap it with a tap and die set to add threads (match the hole/thread size to a small, flat-headed screw you have). Then use a thin piece of metal (or plastic) and screw one end into the existing lock hole, and the other end to the hole you just made in the caddy.


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The operating system may have made backup copies of this file in a number of different places. You may delete a file, but older versions of it may still be stored on disk as part of your operating system’s previous versions feature or other caches, or subsystems specially designed for recovery like volume shadow. SSD's only default instant reaction to a ...


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If you're just testing for cases with filled file systems, maybe fallocate is good enough. And faster too! e.g. fallocate -l 150G


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Moving the entire user profile is one option. This is most easily done by changing the default profile location in the registry and then creating a new user for day-to-day use (you can even delete the old one afterward, if you want). You can move an established user profile, instead, but it's a mess; you have to find every reference in the registry to your ...


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If you would like a graphical interface. Gparted partedmagic They will both allow you to resize and copy your partition from the old hard drive to the new ssd.



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