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NEVER try to install Windows into a non-boot partition, or onto a non-default drive. Recipe for disaster. Either temporarily disconnect SATA1 or else change the BIOS boot order so the empty disk is the first in line. (Better disconnecting as you know that will stop access to the wrong disk) Most computers will boot from USB, but if you cannot, then an ...


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Assuming you are not required to load special drivers for your disk, when you're done with your disk test (which you may as well finish), note that your question implies you may have an unclean partition layout. A format doesn't wipe partition layouts, which Windows will care about but SeaTools should not). This is just one idea so all the advice is the ...


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Your root file system is mounted read-only. This likely happened on a reboot. There are a few options: Configure the system to fix errors during reboot. On Ubuntu this is controlled by the FSCKFIX option in the file /etc/default/rcS. Reboot in recovery mode and run fsck -f /dev/disk/by-uuid/e45e30eb-efa4-4cd9-aaf9-c6cbe46aa41c and reboot again. Boot ...


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I figured it out!! The hard drive casing can be pulled forward about an inch, and then released with pressure down and to the left. Now I have the box pulled out. NOTE: In the image above, I already removed a screw in the metal face just above the case. You see the hole in the top center of image.


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How about a 2.5 inch hard drive instead of a 3.5 drive? Cables with 90 degree connectors would work for power and data. Vent holes along the bay could be used for mounting screws, or just cobble something up for mounting if you're inventive.


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put it under DVD driver, you can find holder for your HDD in computer store i have the same case, or you can remove it and rotate


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As USB 3.0 should be able to transfer around 400 MB/s [1], it should be faster to connect both drives to the USB3. You won't exceed 2x200 MB/s with the harddrives, I am quite sure. For even coming close to this, you would have to copy one very big file to the other harddrive. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB#USB_3.0


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Thanks for every ones suggestions. Finally I did it I used Active File Recovery Professional. It can recover data much as possible. I tried dozen of software some of them are top recovery tools and everything fail. Using Active recovery I manage to create image of failed disk and mount it and recover the data but the problem with that is naming. All file ...


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Ah, in the end, I don't have any problem since both machines are the same model and both are OEM. Apparently, Windows activated itself automatically. If there were a discrepancy with the keys, the "Change Product Key" link would be there. Here is an answer from TechNet: The OEM ( Dell in your case) uses the same key ( may be different between machine ...


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The seemingly missing space can be occupied by many sources. The three most common candidates are: Other partitions (including hidden ones) Hidden/system folders System Restore files


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I would use the PST repair tool that is built into Outlook, here is a KB article from Microsoft on how to do this https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/272227 Okay next to that there must be real damage to the PST structure. Maybe trying a 3rd party tool that will try to reconstruct the file and drop off what is damaged. At this point you are at disaster ...


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Check where is your data location (normally is /var/lib/owncloud/data) and after creating partition and filesystem mount the new filesystem there. Do not forget to copy existing files to new filesystem. In config.php you have line like 'datadirectory' => '/var/lib/owncloud/data', which point to the data directory


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It will almost certainly work. You are replacing one SATA storage device with another SATA storage device. The only tricky parts could be: Does it actually use SATA internally (almost certain, but not mentioned on the page you linked to). Assuming it does use SATA: Does it physically fit?E.g. do I need something to hold the 2½ SSD in place if I ...


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You can't run subst as admin, but as a regular user instead, or your "new" drive won't be recognized. Once I ran the "regular" command prompt it worked. Reference: Windows Explorer not recognizing subst'd drives


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Update: The main point to watch out for is that recent 'advanced format' disks use 4k clusters instead of 512 bytes. Some data transfer methods may leave you with misaligned cluster boundaries, and that will make your system very slow. When partitioning, use a 4k-cluster aware app. Windows 7's diskmgmt.msc is suitable, XP's is not. Knoppix 7's gparted is a ...


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It's about economy of scale. The external hard drive can be used by a much larger class of machines than the internal one.


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having less than 50 reps, I can't make comments I'm confident TestDisk from CG Security will help you get your data easily. It's free. Donload it from this page: http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk_Download After selecting the type of the disk (intel PC) then select analyze once it has finished you will be presented with the list of all found ...


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If by LBA you mean the logical sectors: Convert them to filesystem clusters (e.g. my system has 8 sectors per cluster): C:\>fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo c: ... Bytes Per Sector : 512 Bytes Per Cluster : 4096 ... C:\>set/a 13091568 / (4096 / 512) 1636446 Use fsutil volume querycluster: C:\>fsutil volume querycluster c: 1636446 ...


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Checking the obvious... Was the file being modified (still downloading) during the SSD checksums? If not, it sounds like a faulty SSD. Check the S.M.A.R.T. data.


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This information is accessible through the Defrag API. Third-party defragment tools might expose it. On recent Windows systems (8.1 works, 7 not tested) you can use fsutil to query it: C:\>fsutil file queryextents example.txt VCN: 0x0 Clusters: 0x2 LCN: 0x18f85e There is also another subcommand that dumps all information for all data ...


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Does partitioning affect performance? Absolutely! Will things get slower as the drive fills up and gets used? Yes! BUT will this performance be noticeable in real world, perceivable performance? Probably only a small amount to not noticeable at all on a drive like you mentioned given today's circumstances. Partitioning a drive down for the OS and ...


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Remember, Dropbox is sync service not a backup service. If you want, you can manually upload the contents on the EHD to a folder (archive) that you have unchecked in selective sync. Anything you send to that folder will then not sync with that computer.


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It's a shame how some people use their own definitions based on their experience rather then the standard industry definition: New Pull means it was an item that has been pulled or torn down from a machine that never been used (whether it was a printer/pc/server ...etc). Pull can be either new or refurbished (used). If the machine had been used, then the ...


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Partioining your hard drive will generate two (or more) virtual drives. This will isolate the two - all bad things like fragmentation or viruses etc. will be contained inside the partition, hence you can control them separately. Also, if you partition your system disk in 2 parts (one for the system itself, and one for, say, data backup) you will be able to ...


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I had good results from otherwise unreadable disks with this software. http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk This next one is a solid recovery tool as well. It can get files even if your file table is broken or if they were deleted. It's a damn good forensics tool. It dumps things in a really unorganized way, but you can get all of the data moved. ...


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It will return an error. Mainly because Mac runs a custom "BIOS". But secondly because the hardware doesn't match, so most likely half of OSX will be broken or refuse to boot and the Windows 10 will refuse to boot. To actually run windows on your Macbook, you have to use bootcamp.


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You zeroed the whole disk, it's gone. dd at its finest has rendered your data safe. Despite some conjectures otherwise, that's all it takes anymore.


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Formatting a disk does not erase the data on the disk, only the data on the address tables. So, retrieve formatted data is realistic. If you accidentally reformat a disk that contains useful files, easeus data recovery wizard can help you recover most of the information on the hard drive. More details about how to recover files from formatted hard drive: ...


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Does it sound like screeching metal? If so, likely the ball bearings in the disk spinning mechanism has lost some lubrication; the resulting friction makes those noises, just like any other daily mechanical device you'd use that grinds/rolls surface to surface. Obviously you cannot pry open the mechanism to spray some WD-40 on it. Best case is the friction ...


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I think your problem is completely IdImager related. It's catalogs must be storing the volume label and you need to update them, which shouldn't be a difficult process using IdImager. From: http://forum.idimager.com/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=14164 Go to Catalog Folders, select the top level folder (that can be the drive ID), right click and select ...


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EDIT No, there is not a good chance to recover from a hard drive that is zeroed out. There is chance, but it is very low. and if the formation has done random passes etc. the chance gets lower and nearly zero. http://askubuntu.com/a/21511/364910


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After my initial bootrec.exe attempt didn't detect any Windows installation, I dug further into Microsoft's documentation. I booted into RE again and went to the command line to load diskpart: > diskpart Selected the disk: DISKPART> list disk DISKPART> select disk 0 Selected the partition called "SYSTEM_DRV" (FAT32 filesystem) and assigned it ...


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For recovering data from dying or formatted drive I would recommend use of R-Studio http://www.r-studio.com/Data_Recovery_Download.shtml The best thing about this program is that it is capable of restoring files even when Partitioning data is damaged. But this tool is not for free. The basic version which should be enough for you costs $80


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The HDD does what you are describing automatically when it discovers a bad sector (until it runs out of spares). If you want to force it to scan for (and handle), bad sectors rather than wait for them to be discovered, chkdsk /r will do that. After you run chkdsk /r, additional bad sectors should be extremely rare on a drive that is not in the process of ...


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A long time ago hard drives did not have spare sectors or advanced firmware that did much more than read/write the disk. This was around the time that hard drives were "full-height" (the height of 2 CD-ROMs) and came with a "defect table" sticker which identified bad sectors on the disk from the factory. So filesystem support for identifying bad sectors ...


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If data preservation is your aim, get a new disk as soon as possible. You will, of course, already have at least 2 separate backups of the data anyway! There is software that is aimed at preserving data on drives with problems. Unfortunately, the majority of it is not free. Spinrite from grc.com will do very thorough scans of your drive resetting data ...


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They will be left alone since they have been marked as bad by the hard disk controller firmware. There is software that will reset bad sectors (Spinrite for example) if it can. But the standard drive handling simply assumes that a problem seen once may indicate worse problems ahead - a not unreasonable assumption. If you are seeing bad sectors appear on a ...


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The reason why it doesn't allow you to shrink more than 800MB is because on Windows you have mandatory file lock. I.e. you can't move/delete a file on the disk when it's opened. So if any of the system files (which are loaded when Windows runs) happens to be at the end of your partition, it will prevent shrinking beyond that part because Windows will be ...


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If @Ramhounds approach does not work, you could use Linux for this. A tool to use would be the Gparted live CD (it can also be used as a usb stick). Please be aware that you should reboot Windows twice after resizing. PS: all these operations can damage your data, which should be backed up before


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Windows maps disk letter to concrete disk and stores this information in registry under HKLM\System\MountedDevices. So if you've earlier connected your new disk as non-system, it already has letter F: assigned. If it allows you to run Regedit.exe as Administrator, then simply delete value \DosDevices\C: and then rename \DosDevices\F: to it and restart. You ...


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Will A PCIe Sata Controller help me circumvent AHCI woes? It might. I does not need to. I should though. Now a bit more verbose: AHCI needs to be supported and enabled on the device and its support. This includes the BIOS. Several older chipsets (ICH7 era) did have AHCI capability but not the necessary support in the BIOS to actually use it. Using a ...


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Instead of attaching new disks you can always increase your current volume sizes. You just need to snapshot your current disk, create a new volume with more space and then attach back to your instance using the same mount point used before. In any case: both expanding disks or allocating new ones. Amazon has a pretty clear documentation with step-by-step ...


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having less than 50 reps, I can't make comments In most cases your SATA HDD only needs to be checked using "chkdsk". To do so: Click on Start button type in: cmd right click on it (in the results) and click on "Run as an administrator" let's say your your SATA HDD partition letter is D: So in the command prompt type: chkdsk d: /f /r This may take ...


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Hard drives are designed to safely park their heads on power failure, but recently written data may be lost. Modern hard drives are designed to use the rotational energy in the spindle to quickly park the heads on a power failure. This is rougher than a graceful shutdown as you can typically hear the hard drive click relatively hard on a hard shutdown. As ...


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The read/write heads of a mechanical hard drive float on a cushion of air only nanometers above the surface of the platters. In modern drives there is one head for each magnetic platter surface on the spindle, mounted on a common arm. An actuator arm moves the heads on an arc (roughly radially) across the platters as they spin, allowing each head to access ...


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Hard drives today are very robust. Removing power from them should not result in damaged hard drives. However, it is very possible that if data isnt flushed from the OS or hard drive buffers, that data can be lost.


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HD Sentinel is the best free diagnostic that I've seen. Just run the trial version For benchmarking, ATTO and Crystal Disk Mark. Some References: Free Hard Disk Drive Benchmark/Diagnostic Utility 10 Free Tools to Measure Hard Drive and SSD Performance Advanced Disk Test - Hard drive benchmark


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This entirely depends on your RAID controller, which you havent mentioned. From my experience RAID controllers are very forgiving when it comes to non matching drives. However, there are some that will complain, or wont even work drive if a drive is different enough. Low end RAID controllers that are found on motherboards tend to be the former, so you ...


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The answer of your neighbor is wrong. Creating a second partition makes sense to have data separated from the Windows partition. If you reinstall Windows and format drive C:, the data on the second partition are not being overridden. But a full backup is still recommend before installing Windows again.


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To answer your question, YES, Chocolatey can install *.exe programs locally, but you still need a Chocolatey package pointing to those local native installers (*.exe files). Chocolatey will have the ability to install directly from a native installer, but does not currently have this ability. This is more of a v2 kind of feature. Right now you still need ...



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