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Thanks for your answers but they weren't it. When i switched the M.2 SSD to the second M.2 slot on the motherboard it worked just fine. The Windows 7 installation process recognized the drive and it installed without a hitch. Thanks anyway for your suggestions. Frank.


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If there's disk usage then there's also quite likely (some) CPU usage. Download and run Process Explorer, double-click the System process, and go to Threads. Then sort the threads by CPU usage. The culprit thread should be among those that are using the CPU. If you're lucky, its Start Address will contain the driver's filename.


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Reminds me of a system which I once came across where it would only boot of optical media if it had time to detect what was in the optical drive. Here's the other thing, just because it receive power and spins up doesn't necessarily mean that all is well with your OS drive. I had the same thing happen to me with some other hardware. The question for me is ...


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Basically the Red drive is designed for RAID and NAS environments and has the necessary build-in features for such usage. You can use it as a stand-alone drive in your computer, but instead I would recommend to take a look at WD Blue if you use your PC for everyday computing, or WD Black, which is a performance drive and will give you faster loading times. ...


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Problem with this is that you will have hard time finding drivers for Windows 98 and on top of that if it's computer that's running Windows 7 it likely has no drivers at all available for Windows 98 and because of that this will not work at all. Now what you can try is that you can try to install the harddrive into the computer as secondary harddrive and ...


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The only way it could be copied to the mapped drive would be if the drive were connected at the time. Otherwise, the transfer request would time out (probably why it seemed to freeze) and cancelled. You should have gotten an error message stating the drive was unavailable. To be sure, when you reconnect to your network at work, go to that drive and see if ...


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Summary: After some research, the reasons seems to be due to the SATA-USB controller inside the enclosure. The oscillating pattern is unusual behavior, but without a technological explanation whether this behavior will hurt the HDDs remains unanswered. I tested with several HDDs using the enclosure and all of them exhibit the oscillating behavior, as such ...


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What is meant by Packing a number of logical records into physical blocks mean here? First you have to understand what a "logical record" is. It can be variable length, such as text in sentences. Of it can be fixed length, such as a data structure. Packing determines how to organize data in the form of these logical records into "physical" ...


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It's actually really simple, yet hard to explain. I think we just need to paraphrase what the author already said. The disk demands that you talk to it in blocks. Assuming the block size is 512 Bytes: If you want to write 400 Bytes to disk, you must add another 112 Bytes to make up 512 Bytes. The extra 112 Bytes may as well be zeros, but they have to be ...


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…I tried to transfer data back and restore my Mac but it’s come up with that case sensitive. This description of the issue confuses me a bit, but I think I understand what has happened. When you took your Mac in for repair and they had to wipe everything and now when you took it back home you found out the system hard drive is now formatted as a case ...


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Never let your hard drive get more than 70% full. If you study queuing theory, under most conditions, the wait time vs service load curve has a knee in the curve that skyrockets to long wait times when the load factor reaches the neighborhood of 70%.


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Another thing you can try is to upgrade your wifi to 5ghz so it doesn't even see the 3.0 interference. I had similar issue and picked up an AC 1750 router and connected to the 5ghz bssid and noticed the issue disappeared. Never gave it a second thought til now. Besides the interference resolution this will also increase your networks speed by a noticible ...


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Can you run an extended test using Data Lifeguard Diagnostics to see if there will be any bad sectors or errors detected and tell me what the results were? Just make a backup of your data before doing so because if the program finds anything on the drive it will try to fix them automatically. You can download it from here: ...


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Have you used gparted before (http://gparted.org)? I highly recommend it and it's free. I would boot into a gparted live CD and resize the partitions from there with a nice, friendly GUI (make sure Windows has shut down cleanly beforehand and isn't in hibernate etc). Your UUID shouldn't change, but after resizing the partitions, you should run sudo blkid ...


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If the hang doesn't go away unless you power cycle, you may need to reflash your BIOS. If the hang is merely an extended wait on the BIOS splash it is possible that there is some kind of issue with your boot sequence. To rule out an issue with any system files related to booting, run sfc /scannow from an administrator command prompt and allow it to ...


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I will answer your second question first for brevity. If the laptop is currently powered AND there are a large number of Read/Write operations happening on a HDD, there is a potential for scratching on the platters. It is also possible that an optical disk drive or fan may sustain damage. It depends on how hard you swing/hit the device. Now, to retrieve ...


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The typical traditional terminology for a "bad sector" is a portion of a hard drive that is physically failing to work right. It's just plain broken. That is why you're getting some people reporting that a BSOD shouldn't cause this. A BSOD may cause invalid data to be written; some advanced RAID cards have been known to be battery powered so that they can ...


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Moving the files from the "Program Files" directory will definitely not work. Most programs such as Office and VS have registry files also associated with them, which will be rendered completely useless if you move files. As you said your drive is just 40GB, I presume you haven't installed many programs on your OS. If you have the time, you could uninstall ...


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Yes, it's safe to delete the old system image.


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I'm new here, with no reputation, so I cannot affect the rating of answers above, but the green checked answer of Nov 13, 2009 at 8:42 is almost completely wrong! The first 2 sentences are completely wrong, comparing apples (raw count of 2163) to oranges (normalized score of 252). Reallocated_Sector_Ct is zero! That means not one sector has been remapped ...


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For the program files, there is always a risk involved: There are LOTS of programs out there, that have C: hardcoded. This sometimes poses a risk also for user profiles. To work around this, I typically use junctions and mount another partition on the corresponding directories.


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The SMART attributes 1 Raw_Read_Error_Rate and 7 Seek_Error_Rate are NOT counters, they are error rates. Their raw values are not meaningful to us, are defined by the manufacturer. The Raw_Read_Error_Rate raw value is not reported for any hard disk except those made by Seagate, so you have a Seagate. The important number for it is the VALUE of 118, which ...


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Clicking is usually but not always bad. It's a recalibration of the head alignment parameters, and if successful stops after a few 'clicks'. If the drive is no longer making unusual noises, is performing satisfactorily, and provides a SMART report as fine as the one above, then it is probably fine. However there may still be damage, as yet undetected, and ...


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You cannot access the disk because linux OSs use the ext filesystem which Windows cannot natively read. Your best bet would be to install another linux OS on you virtualbox then attach the debian disk to the new linux OS. Or if you really want to access it via Winodws then you'll have to install special software to do so.


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A BSOD cannot cause a bad sector. There is nothing that can be done at the interface of a properly-working disk drive that can cause a bad sector. There are no commands that will tell a drive to write anything but proper data; the commands the hard drive accepts are too high-level for anything else. You likely have a failing hard drive. You had one bad ...


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This problem is resolved in my 10 years old HP desktop (4 cores), with drive: 3TB Western Digital Green, but it should be the same with Seagate too. I added the solution to this blog: Post Anything Here. In a nutshell you need 2 things to do: to install the Intel RAID driver (free). to use a good tool for extending the partition to the maximum size, ...


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This problem is resolved in my 10 years old HP desktop (4 cores), with drive: 3TB Western Digital Green. I added the solution to this blog: Post Anything Here. In a nutshell you need 2 things to do: to install the Intel RAID driver (free). to use a good tool for extending the partition to the maximum size, like AOMEI Partition Assistant (freeware). ...


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This problem is resolved in my 10 years old HP desktop (4 cores, Windows 7 - 32 bits), exactly with your kind of drive: 3TB Western Digital Green. I added the solution to this blog: Post Anything Here. In a nutshell you need 2 things to do: to install the Intel RAID driver (free). to use a good tool for extending the partition to the maximum size, like ...


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I succeeded in installing Windows 7, in this way: I have re-installed Windows 10 back into a 30GB partition, formatted it, which created a supplementary reserved 100 MB partition. I have created a new 50 GB partition out o the big 160 GB space and left the rest unpartitioned because I had reached the maximum of 4 primary partitions. I installed Windows 7 ...


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Several possible issues. you were sold a low-quality or fake (additional question: other machines - was it recognized as 3.0?). I see that you said it worked previously, but this is no indication of good drive it doesn't slide into the port completely, thus not making full connection. I actually think it is the problem, since you say it works on other ...


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Instead of thinking about encrypting your full disk, I would recommend you instead look at specific data in a secure way. Meaning—for example—I am using Mac OS X. My main hard drive is not encrypted. I use GPG/PGP for some mail interactions, but it is mostly in the clear. What I do care about and secure I keep stored on encrypted disk images I can create ...


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Assuming it's a proper harddisk password it's not usually secure for spinning hard disks. The password you enter is stored in some non-volatile ram/flash on the drive and the drive rejects data access commands until you send one that matches. Basically it just means you need special hardware (a serial port) to remove the password. ...


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It is both and neither - its the response time the OS believes the hardware is taking, and is governed by the speed of the HD, the SATA transfer speed, the hard drive cache, the disk write-back policy and the filesystem. It is possible to move a file within a filesystem without ever touching the actual file by simply updating the pointers in the file system ...


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It is a best guess by your operating system (whatever you use) as to how rapidly the file is being copied. It is not the HDD write speed or the SATA transfer speed, although if those are improved by an upgrade, files will move faster. Those and multiple other factors come into play in the calculation. A discussion of several methods of calculation may be ...


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Clicking is always bad. The sounds comes from the drive head doing repeated read attempts due to read failure. Pull as much data as possible, and when it stops working, disconnect the drive, power and data, and remove from computer if possible, let it rest for couple hours, and try again. Repeat until it fully dies.


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If it is clicking, you should expect it'll fail in the immediate future. You'll want to back up any data on it and probably replace the drive. There's no guarantee that the drive will fail right away, but you should expect it to. http://harddriveclicking.net/ has some additional information, though most of it isn't good. It does point out that you might ...


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On Linux you can use top to check if you have a process that is keeping the CPU busy. If you are using Windows you have Task Manager also to check the same thing.


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I nearly get what you mean (Although im in agree with the comments) You can use a raw recovery tool which raw means that there is no partition in the hard drive. Try this: http://www.easeus.com/datarecoverywizard/recover-raw-drive.htm


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The most usual reason for that is that the cooling airflow is somehow being impeded, most likely due to dirt / dust in the intake grill and/or air conduit and/or CPU cooler gills. One more common cause is not enough clearance between the air intake grill (usually under the laptop) and the surface below (sometimes a lap), which blocks off the air flow.


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From the article you provided (reading as I write this): The ROM chip that contains the firmware includes a small amount of storage that goes unused. If the ROM chip is 2 megabytes, the firmware might take up just 1.5 megabytes, leaving half a megabyte of unused space that can be employed for hiding data the attackers want to steal. One way to do this, ...


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Bad airflow and a very busy computer. Very hard to say anything else about it without additional information.


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Does it do more than one thing? It does what the author makes it do. The researchers who identified this particular modified firmware have not released what it does exactly. What the reported modified firmware does exactly might never be known without the source code. Or does it only infect the boot sector when activated? It would be activated ...


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To have access to a file/folder through a share, the user must have the appropriate share permissions but also the appropriate NTFS permissions (the most restrictive permissions apply). These concepts are explained in this Microsoft Technet article. The point is your user probably does not have the required NTFS permissions on the folder he needs to access. ...


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After you updated BIOS or cleared CMOS, You have to change the SATA mode to RAID manually before the OS boots. However, If you forgot to change that, you should boot your system with Windows Boot DVD and click the Repair... then you should use the command prompt and run the below command in Windows Drive (for example if your Windows Drive is C: you first run ...


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The reason XP shows the disk as 745 GB has to do with the limits of MBR partitioning (XP does not support GPT partitioning). With MBR partitioning you can only have 2^32 blocks of 512 bytes each; that is about 2 TB, hence the 2 TB limit. Worse: Even before any partition table entries are created, the 3 TB drive's capacity is reported by the drive as ...


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This may have a good chance to work: Use the second drive to boot in correct mode. The one you 'recovered' let it unplugged and after everything starts, reconnect it and re-mirror the second drive onto the first (the altered one).


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If you are sure which files you want to keep and make sure they are on the right partition yes, that will work, but you have to be careful that all the files you need to keep get stored on the important files partition. Many Windows programs are poorly written and assume that you only have one hard drive, that they can store files wherever they want (most ...


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You can easily do this on Linux using mdadm. Note, though, that if you go with RAID5 using your 7 partitions, you would still only be able to survive the loss of a single partition. Lose your 1.5 TB drive, for example, and your array is unrecoverable. If instead, you went with the following: create 2 x 700 GB partitions on 1.5 TB drive create 2 x 700 GB ...


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I would recommend booting into a linux based rescue OS from a USB stick and use linux tools to repartition - they tend to be more reliable than windows tools from my experience. Knoppix is one free example I have used previously: http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html You can then use the included tools fdisk or gparted to repartition drives without ...


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After some time, I can confirm that the raw read error rate value isn't very meaningful nor reliable. I have seen this counter reset to 0 more than once since I posted this question. And although the normalized value has decreased, it is still way above the threshold. The reason why I posted this question was because I started to realize that the HDD was ...



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