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17

Interesting project. You need to nail down your requirements and your budget, and that will help you nail down what hardware you need for your design. Step back from the "1TB drive" decision for the moment; a year or two from now that will seem rather limited. Also consider how badly you want the ability to use 20 drives in this system -- that's a lot of ...


13

Well this is a LITTLE bigger than what you want, but the design/architecture, on the hardware side would be close to what you need. Finding a 20 drive, or even a 15 drive case is gonna be tricky though


11

Lifehacker has a set of night classes that cover most of the topics in question. This is from my own experiences, and memory, however and may differ from that. Toolswise, get a good, comfy medium sized cross head screwdriver - I tend to favour one i got from ikea with a rubber handle. You will use this a LOT (unless you have a tool-less case) so get a comfy ...


10

It is usually easiest to install the motherboard first (already having installed the processor and fan) and if there are any of those little white protectors that fit between the case and the board, install them. Connect the power cables. After that, I install things like the drives, optical and hard drives. Then install any PCI(x) cards. Then install the ...


10

To begin with, to use that amount of memory, you need to have a 64-bit Operating system. Next, I would check the chipset of your laptop's motherboard (can usually be seen at startup, usually one letter and two numbers. Then look up the specification. I can't comment for certain, but a lot of laptops of Core 2 age don't support more than 4GB of memory. edit ...


9

What you are referring to is related to DDR3 memory standardization. DDR3 or PC3 is the Standard Voltage memory module that operates at 1.50V (JEDEC compliant) DDR3L or PC3L is the Low Voltage memory module that operates at 1.35V (JEDEC compliant) DDR3U or PC3U is the Ultra Low Voltage memory module that operates at 1.25V (still not JEDEC compliant) ...


8

LPC stand for Low Pin Count - it is the chip used to connect all of the "legacy" PC components on motherboards. For example it will control the PS/2, floppy, parallel and serial ports. Before the LPC all of these devices were in the ISA bus and once boards stopped including them ISA slots, they switched to LPC because it was a simplifier interface for the ...


7

Googling on 17R dock leads me to Dell's website and from there to the page with the Dell USB 3.0 superspeeds dual video docking station. Since is it USB there is not dedicated docking connector. It also lacks some features. E.g. you need to open the laptop, press the power button and then you can close the laptops lid again and start working from the ...


7

What is meant by "OC" (Overclocked) varies depending on what exactly the vendor means. Yes it is ambiguous, and the only way to know for sure is to contact the manufacturer or vendor and obtain clarification. There is no "standard" way for it to mean one specific thing all of the time. It could mean: This chip has been tested to support (under certain ...


7

There's no "technical" limitation to this as Windows will ask which card is the primary one and will use that for all intents and purposes unless you tell it otherwise through Nvidia's control panel. However, I don't see the point of keeping an old card that will just contribute to heat and power draw of your system. Dust can be reduced by covering the hole ...


6

From supermicro's page for that model For Single CPU: Memory must be populated in CPU1 DIMMs only For Dual CPUs: Recommended that memory be populated equally in adjacent memory banks I do believe modern processors have their memory controllers on die, so this makes a lot of sense. Even if it didn't, it would be a lot more complicated to ...


6

I would say, without a doubt, yes. SATA-III has a maximum throughput of 6.0 Gb/s, while SATA-II has a maximum throughput of 3.0 Gb/s. If we take into account the fact that both use 8b/10b encoding, both buses max out at a reasonable 600 MB/s and 300 MB/s. I personally have the 120 GB model of the OCZ Agility 3, and it is running on my motherboard's native ...


5

Dell are notorious for having cases and motherboards that go together. Although you have a mini tower, it's a dell mini tower, so a standard layout motherboard won't fit. It's even dodgy whether a motherboard from a different Optiplex would fit your case. For safety I'd get the exact same model motherboard as the one you have.


5

It supports 64-bit Windows 7. All Merom processors are 64-bit capable.


5

There are several Adaptec, 3Ware and Areca RAID controllers with 24 SATA ports available. Keep in mind that agreggating 20 drives mean you're having 20 times more chance of a catastrophic failure, so RAID-5 or RAID-6 really is mandatory. You can also add drives to a RAID array with those professional RAID controllers. So my advice is to start with one of ...


5

If they're both the exact same model, then yes, very likely. If they're different models, but from the same series, then it might be doable, but depends on the exact models. For instance, the motherboards of certain ThinkPad T60 and T61 models are identical, and swapping in a T61 motherboard is a popular modification for the T60. If they're from different ...


5

This depends on the air flow in your case and on the ambient temperature. And on the drives themselves. If you live in the tropics, no air flows over the drives and they get hot (e.g. being multi-platter old 7200+ RPM drives). Then yes, worry. Measure the temperature (software wise), add a fan if needed. If you live someplace cool and/or have some air flow ...


5

On modern PCs, the memory controller is part of the CPU. So the CPU can impose limits on the memory speed. If you use a Sandy Bridge processor with DDR3-1600 memory, it will run at DDR3-1333 speeds (though with improved latency) unless you overclock the memory controller.


4

Including the assumptions from the other answers, you really just want to replace the broken LCD screen by taking it from the non-responding laptop. The other way around, transferring the motherboard of the working_MB/bad_LCD to the nonworking_MB/good_LCD is about 4 times as much effort/time.


4

I hate to dig up such an old question, but these answers need help. There are a number of different 2U cases that feature 12x3.5" hot swap bays (3 vertically x 4 horizontally -- See Supermicro's SC826), , and even some that also have an internal bay or two (http://www.servaris.com/servers_m2100.php). It's dense, but not impossible. If you want to get a ...


4

I would get CPU-Z and make sure it lists the CPU as supporting "EM64T" (which is what Intel calls the AMD64 extension). It will be listed on the first tab under Instructions.


4

Assemble your computer on a table or wooden floor; don't assemble in on a carpet since that might cause static electricity which might cause failure of some devices. Connect the hardware in this order: Power supply Motherboard - Attach it properly with all the screws Attach the hard drives, DVD, Blu-Ray reader...... Use all the screws needed Attach the ...


4

It depends on what you want to measure with the meter... If measuring the total power consumed, then place it between the wall and the UPS (which will also cover everything plugged into the UPS). If measuring only the power consumed by your computer, then place it between the UPS and your computer (the device you're measuring). A note about measuring ...


4

Here's a wiki on memory interleaving, but to directly answer your question; yes, mixing memory types/speeds/etc will result in slower memory timing speeds (lowest common denominator) and certain functions being disabled if memory sizes are mixed. The reason for this is that memory interleaving is a sort of 'computer math trick' that allows the RAM to have ...


4

My low tech way to doing this is to nearly always visit Crucial.com and see if they list the pc/motherboard I'm looking to buy memory for. They do list your motherboard. Quite often I buy from Crucial but even if I don't I use their info to compare specifications with other vendors.


4

Combining different independent computers is possible. The supercomputer Titan, e.g., is composed of 18,688 different nodes; each node has its own CPU, GPU and RAM. The problem lies in the specific details of le wild magic. You need a distributed operating system (Titan uses UNICOS) and – as far as I know – there are no desktop versions. But ...


4

I think he'd be fine without one. The biggest problem is making sure that hot air generated by the CPU and GPU can easily get out of the case. But that's a pretty large case, the video card does a good job exhausting heat from the case, and the power supply draws its inlet air from near the CPU. Though it's not essential, I would add an additional rear fan. ...


3

Wireless cards are pretty generic and hp uses a few different manufacturers. There's actually a good chance that would be interchangeable with other brands. Intel or atheros and ralink are all standard in one or another model g6. As to the graphics card it's probably built into the motherboard on a g6



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