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43

I have an i7 2600K and P8Z68-V LE. It should be similar in your computer. The hardware virtualization setting is located in Advanced mode->Advanced tab->CPU Configuration-> Intel Virtualization Technology According to this page, your i7 2600 will support VT-x and VT-d. My "K" (unlocked version) only supports VT-X (so Intel can still sell Xeons) so yours may ...


19

Self Answer: In the BIOS (In my machine, hold F1 during boot-up.) I enabled CPU > Intel Virtualization Technology. Then it worked.


18

You should go back to your virtualbox "new machine wizard" (it's the thing that opens when you hit "new") then when selecting your OS Type, select "Ubuntu" and switch the Version to "Ubuntu (64 bit)". This makes sure it enables the 64bit processor extensions for your machine.


9

After some more Googling last night I got a lead that it might be a limitation of Windows 8 Client Hyper-V. Here's a guy having issues with two OS's reporting different VT-x values. This SuperUser question put me on to the idea that Client Hyper-V has some hard limitations. This morning I've uninstalled Hyper-V from the "Turn Windows features on or off" ...


8

From this LinuxQuestions post: Linux does not put arbitrary limits on the number of hard disks. Also, from this post in the Debian mailing list: That's easy. After /dev/sdz comes /dev/sdaa. And, I've just tested it by making and logging into 800 ISCSI targets on my laptop, after /dev/sdzz comes /dev/sdaaa. :) and this blog post: For SATA and ...


5

No. Intel VT technology is only useful when running programs that are compatible with it, and actually use it. AFAIK, the only useful tools that can do this are sandboxes and virtual machines. Even then, enabling this technology can be a security risk in some cases. Often, virtualization technology is not required to emulate x86 or x86-64 instructions, ...


5

If one were to read the installation instructions one would find: If performance issues are seen on Windows 8 it is recommended to disable Hyper-V. If one were to read anecdotes on the Internet, then one would find that HAXM and Hyper-V are mutually exclusive. Hyper-V on Windows 8 prevents the installation, execution of many other virtualization ...


4

While what Wikipedia has listed as "No" is hardware virtualization (referring to Intel's VT-d technology), your motherboard's manual (which does not mention hardware virtualization, but only "Virtualization Technology") actually refers to enabling/disabling processor virtualization (Intel's VT-x technology). The two are fundamentally different, so to avoid ...


4

I think it's because 90% of their customers expect a new PC to behave like their old one only faster. Turning on "Execute Disable", for example, can break legacy software so they don't enable it because the average Joe won't understand what's happened. Turning on the TPM by default will cause Windows to load the drivers and prompt the user to set it up. ...


4

There's actually a pretty good answer to "Are there any benchmarks for virtual machines with and without VT-x? over on Server Fault. Even though the answer is about a year and half old it is still reasonable. The takeaway regarding performance is "it depends" in general AMD-V and Intel VTx do increase stability and ease development of virtual machines. As ...


4

Call up MSFT and tell them, they'll help you along the (re)activation.


4

I believe it is for security reasons. A rogue hypervisor can install itself and then run the main OS, the main OS can't tell that it's running under a hypervisor (sometimes considered ring -1). It could potentially be the ultimate virus. So you have to enable explicitly if you know you want to run a hypervisor.


4

Do you have a win XP license? If you have one, I suggest you to use Virtual Box which can be highly customized at this point. If not, it may be possible to set the vm's process two more than one core using the task manager.


4

IOMMU/VT-D is available in pretty much all AMD CPUs. The gotcha is if it is implemented on the motherboard. edit: Note the Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IOMMU I/O virtualization is not performed by the CPU, but instead by the chipset.


3

while it is true you should not enable VT unless you really use it, there is no more risk if the feature is on or not. you need to protect your system the best you can, whether it is for virtualization or not. VT makes nothing possible that was not possible before! http://x86vmm.blogspot.com/2006/08/blue-pill-is-quasi-illiterate.html


3

Both your motherboard and CPU should support hardware virtualization, so it is definitely worth a shot to upgrade the BIOS to latest version.


3

Hyper-v takes exclusive control of the vt-x feature. To disable it, you need to either remove hyper-v or disable hyper-v using vt-x (which renders hyper-v unusable until you revert the setting) For 2), bcdedit /set hypervisorlaunchtype off to undo bcdedit /set hypervisorlaunchtype on or bcdedit /set hypervisorlaunchtype auto


3

Unfortunately, hardware virtualization is a CPU feature that isn't on the T5800 (source), so there's no way to enable it with software.


2

My experience (i don't remember the numbers exactly) Windows XP (host) Windows XP (guest) I did a windows benchmark in both (host and guest) Windows XP (host) CPU 100% Graphics100% Math 100% Disk 100% Windows XP (Guest VMWARE Virtualization ON) : CPU :80% Graphics 80% Math 80% Disk : 120% Windows XP (Guest VirtualPC Virtualization ON) : CPU :70% ...


2

The E5200 does not support hardware virtualization. It does support DEP though. You'll need to install Windows 7 x64 if you want to be able to use 64-bit software.


2

Both VMware ESXi and Microsoft Hyper-V allow pass-through disks, where the VMs can directly access drives as though they were physically connected. They also both can be run from USB flash drives and they are both free as well. I don't know much about Xen and KVM. Hyper-V is quite a lot easier to use, but VMware ESXi has more advanced features. If you ...


2

This might be possible using OpenNode. It comes as an ISO with a softraid setup, but I don't know if it will meet your needs. OpenNode will give you either OpenVZ or KVM virtualization. Hardware Intel-VT or AMD-V virtualization support is required for full KVM virtualization. Only 64-bit server hardware is supported. At least 4 GB of RAM is needed (8 GB ...


2

The Asus Bios Utility said VT-x was supported but I couldn't find the setting to Enable Virtualization. After an hour of head banging I noticed the scroll bars - little thin things, am sure the designer thought he was very clever.


2

Blue pill can be a proof for this action. It can be used by malware and create malware which completely invisible to OS.


2

Have you checked that virtualization is enabled in BIOS? Typically it is located under "Advanced BIOS features" as "Virtualization Technology". See this page for more instructions: http://www.sysprobs.com/disable-enable-virtualization-technology-bios For dell-specific instructions on enabling virtualization, see "How to Enable VT on a Dell for VMware"


2

This article should provide a lot of information along the lines you are looking for. However, it is specific to VMware. The general case is that it really depends on a number of things: Is VT-x / AMD-V in use? Is EPT in use? Is VT-d or some type of IOV in use? The above questions are hardware instruction usage questions. Depending on which AMD/Intel ...


2

Your CPU does not support VT-x.


1

There is, in fact, a limit on the number of drives exposed by Linux's abstract SCSI subsystem, which includes SATA and USB drives. This is because device files are marked by major/minor device number pairs, and the scheme allocated for the SCSI subsystem has this implicit limit. https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/devices.txt The following major ...


1

A PC with two network interfaces, each connected to a distinct LAN, should be able to communicate with both LANs without need for virtualisation and without needing any special configuration.


1

Current versions of VMware and VirtualBox will both take advantage of AMD-V. The Getting Started with VMware Player 4.0 document indicates the host CPU requirements. Your particular CPU may not be supported (as documentation indicates 1.3 GHz clock or greater), but that may be a documentation artifact. There's more history about early revisions of AMD's ...



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