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Since your display supports HDMI 1.4 and, according to Wikipedia, 2560×1600p75 is supported since HDMI 1.3, you’ll face no problems when using HDMI. For your intent, it is absolutely equal to DisplayPort. HDMI cables are no longer “versioned”. Instead, they are separated into “Standard” and “High Speed”, with the latter being capable of 4K etc. So your ...


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Displayport is the way to go, because it was meant exactly for this. HDMI has a lower bandwidth and some videocards will natively have DisplayPort as extra channel, but limit the use of HDMI+DVI. For example, if you have an ATI card, you can have 2 DVI ports, or a DVI and HDMI port, but not 2 DVI and HDMI port. However, next to 2 of these, you can have a ...


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Go with the DisplayPort. Although the high speed HDMI cable offers true 4k (4096 x 2160) and the DisplayPort only offers 4k formatted for 16:9 i believe (3840 x 2160), the DisplayPort offers a refresh rate of up to 60hz, while the HDMI is limited to 24hz, and both surpass your resolution needs. You can find more info here: ...


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In your case, DisplayPort is probably going to be the better option. The newest DisplayPort standard (1.2) supports 21.6 Gbit/s bandwidth, while the newest HDMI (2.0) standard only supports a bandwidth of 18 Gbits/s. Your RF-G1167 can't be any higher than 1.2, and, as such, won't support Ultra-HD resolutions (according to the page on the BestBuy website). I ...


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HDMI and DVI are actually exactly the same digital signal output, just names for the different type of connector. You're not really converting the signal but rather the adapter. VGA is an analog output. As long as you use the HDMI/DVI ports from your PC to your monitor you'll have the best signal possible. Avoid VGA since that's analog and not ideal for your ...


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If this is the same as windows 7 then unfortunately microsoft doesn't have an option to give users control over this. So with that, granted this is going to sound unorthodox, it's the fix many use in windows 7. Just cut a thin strip of electrical tape and cover pin 19 on your tv's hdmi cable. This is the pin that tells the computer the display is off. If ...


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HDMI is a digital protocol, and VGA is analog. You can't use a straightforward cable to plug an HDMI source into a VGA port, you also need a box that will convert the signal from digital to analog. Alternatively, some of the HP 14s have VGA outputs, so a VGA to VGA would work if the port is present.


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What you descibe sounds most like the adapter is doing the best it can for what it is. There are "sync" settings in (only) some VGA monitors that could compensate completly for a sloppy conversion. The digital to analog converters and VGA monitors can also generally run best at specific resolutions, or aspect ratios. As you discovered they can still ...


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Could be the automatic overscan compensation. Unfortunately I don't have a Windows notebook anymore, so I can't tell you where exactly to find the setting. It's in the Intel Graphics Control Panel. Of course, this all applies only if you're actually able to set the correct resolution in Windows.


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I figured it out, there's a custom resolution option in the Intel graphics control panel. I just added a 1280x800 resolution with 59Hz refresh rate and now when I choose that resolution, there's also 59Hz option alongside 60Hz.


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If i understand correctly you want to expand your desktop over screen 1 and 2 and then duplicate either of them onto the HDTV. I know you say that you are used to the Catalyst Control Center, but I would suggest for these simple things to use the built in windows "Screen Resolution" control panel. To duplicate a desktop onto your HDTV do the following: ...


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VGA is compatible with DVI. That was part of the design of DVI, after all. You should avoid using the VGA port if at all possible because it's analog and lossy. You'll likely notice ghosting and other artifacts. HDMI may be compatible with DVI, depending on your hardware. For example, AMD graphics cards ship with DVI-to-HDMI adapters. This only works ...


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Yes, you can use any adapter cable between HDMI to DVI. Then you use a cable to connect the display to the adapter cable. To connect a DVI monitor to a VGA port on a laptop you will need a VGA-DVI converter. For more information about how to connect a DVI monitor to a VGA port on a laptop look at this question: How can I connect a DVI monitor to the VGA ...


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FYI, I had tried the pin 19 trick but it presented more issues because the computer's video card can't detect the connected monitor if this pin was blocked. It must be due to the on-board video card that I use. After some research, I bit the bullet and bought an adapter called "Monitor Detect Killer device". No more issues when shutting off the monitors ...


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The webcamd software is a port of the Linux USB device drivers for webcams and DVB devices into userspace on FreeBSD. There is a good chance you'd be able to grab video with that. Not sure if those would support hardware encoding, though.


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HDMI is generally designed to work with standard TV resolution : 720×480, 720×576, 1280×720, 1920×1080. VGA (640×480) should also be supported everywhere. Even though there should not be any problem with using other resolutions, your VGA-HDMI (which is an active digital to analog converted, therefore it has his own chipset and firmware with hardcoded values) ...


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According to page of that HDMI Switch that you are planning to buy, the HDMI version 1.4 is supported. The maximum speed of the data transfer over HDMI is given here, as 8.16 Gb/s. Notice that the speed is measured as Gigabits per second. Now, what you want to render is 2560x1440 at 120hz. Calculating the bandwidth required: 2560 x 1440 x 120 x 24 = ...


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There is no penalty to convert from DVI on your video card to HDMI on your monitor; The DVI ports on your graphics card simultaneously output a DVI-D, DVI-A, HDMI, and VGA signal over each DVI port. The DVI -> HDMI and DVI -> VGA "adapters" you find are really just selecting which signal to use. Note, this is true only for the DVI ports you find on ...


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This sounds like it could be a graphics card issue. As far as I know, the HDMI and LCD display are separate systems. Try doing a clean install of your graphics card drivers (uninstall, restart, reinstall, restart). If that doesn't resolve your issue then it sounds to me like your gpu is going bad. ...


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If you get the similar flickering while using any output (built-in LCD, HDMI, VGA, etc), then perhaps the issue is with your video adapter rather than the LCD.


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This fixed it for me. Newest version of Catalyst Control Center as of today. 6-24-2014 Preferences - Advanced View Left side column - Open My VGA Displays - Click on properties (VGA Display) Uncheck EDID Set display size and frequency. I recommend 60 hz unless you know for sure it can handle other frequencies as this is default for any monitor.



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