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46

I see a range of problems in the answers and comments here (even in some highly-voted answers that provide otherwise very good information) that span from minor deficiencies that need explanation to some serious inaccuracies, so I think that some clarification is needed. The question is specifically: What is the difference between 1080p and 1080i? so I will ...


40

These are how the image is 'painted' onto the screen. The "i" in resolutions represents 'Interlaced'. Basically meaning every other (horizontal) line is drawn in one frame, and then the opposite lines are drawn in the next frame, leaving it up to your eyes/brain to put the two frames into one complete one. The "p" means 'Progressive', which means all the ...


21

Edit: since quite a lot has changed in the drivers (version 2011.0419 as of this writing) since I initially wrote this post, I decided to update it. The procedure is now drastically simplified: right click on the desktop and choose AMD VISION Engine Control Center from the left side of the window go to My Digital Flat-Panels and choose Scaling Options ...


17

1080p represents 1920 pixels displayed across a screen horizontally and 1080 pixels down a screen vertically. However, unlike 1080i all pixel rows or lines are displayed progressively, providing the most detailed high definition video image that is currently available to consumers. 1080i represents 1920 pixels displayed across a screen horizontally and 1080 ...


8

The i is for interlaced (each frame only updates half the lines each frame, as is the case with pure-HD television. The p is for progressive, which updates the whole screen. 1080i60 means that you're getting 60 half frames (alternating lines) per second, so only 30 complete frames per second. Sometimes an interlaced signal will be a progressive signal ...


7

This is normal - the SD version is for the iPod/iPhone (smaller file size). AFAIK there is no option to prevent download of the SD version.


6

Just press the option key while you're in Displays in System Preferences. You'll get a Detect displays button (bottom right).


6

I solved it! You need to unplug the HDMI cable before you do this because the driver doesn't show up in the list if you don't. If you locate the driver in "Properties", right click the speaker down by the clock on your desktop toolbar. Select "Playback Devices". There you should have the "Digital audio (HDMI)" icon. Click it and select "Properties" at ...


5

Monitor configuration is stored in /Library/Preferences/com.apple.windowserver.plist. You should be able to delete that file entirely to return to default settings. EDIT: Found some more. Also remove every file named ~/Library/Preferences/ByHost/com.apple.windowserver.(gobbledegook).plist.


5

The problem is likely due to "overscan." It's normal for HDTVs, by default, to throw away a few percent from each side of the image. The reasons are historical; lots of TV broadcasts use the edges of the picture to encode data, and it can be distracting if it's visible. The best solution is to disable overscan on the TV; check its settings or manual, or ...


5

Televisions and monitors have different characteristics, such as brightness, reflectivity, resolution, price, etc. Typical 32" LCD has 1366 x 766 resolution, and wouldn't be comfortable for daily work. Casual online gaming should be ok though.


4

This problem seems to affect many people (as per search engines) with the most suspected/mentioned cause being insufficient drivers from ATI (NVIDIA apparently has updated its drivers for related issues successfully, while ATI tried that too, but some users still seem to have the same issue afterwards). Consequently you might try to find updated drivers for ...


4

There is no definitive max length specified in the HDMI specification. I'm using a 5m cable myself to transmit 720p without issue. There's usually not any difference in quality between cheap and expensive cables. I would go for the cheapest cable I can find at the length you want.


4

I was able to do this using a custom EDID in the screen, either by adding this to xorg.conf screen section: Option "CustomEDID" "DFP-0:/path/to/file/custom_edid.bin" Or by generating a config: sudo nvidia-xconfig --custom-edit="CRT-0:/my/monitor.bin" Now the big question, How to produce an acceptable EDID .bin? On Windows XP, I had to install two ...


3

This Mini DisplayPort to HDMI adapter is available from Apple. You will also need an HDMI cable. Apple offers this one (as well as several others).


3

3D technology is evolving rapidly, with several competing approaches under development, so the HDMI 1.4 specification establishes protocols for a number of popular 3D display methods, including: Frame, line, or field alternative methods Side by side methods (full and half) 2D plus depth methods A complete list of the supported 3D formats can be found in ...


3

Both ATI and Nvidia have Linux drivers available. They're usually closed source, but they will work. Any new graphics card will have HDMI or DVI. DVI is 100% compatible with HDMI, they're the same connection but a different plug. You can get converter cables, and some graphics cards even come with converter dongles. The larger concern is going to be power. ...


3

Just send the output to JUST the HDTV, then you can use the TV's native resolution. So, if you have a 1080P television, it will send out to 1080P, assuming your graphics card supports it and you use a DVI or HDMI cable (will VGA output 1080p?)


3

the t200 has maximum video resolution 2048 x 1152, 32-bit so it can the t100 has maximum video resolution 1280 x 1024 (standard screen); 1440 x 900 (widescreen) 32bit so it cannot


3

Did you have the HDMI plugged into the same port on the TV? Some TVs have one HDMI port set to "PC Mode" which has no overscan. Your manual should tell you which. I had this problem with my WXGA capable 32" Philips TV. Any HDMI port other than HDMI1 and it would overscan like that.


3

Yes, it is possible for a cheap HDMI cable to produce a poor image, as you are seeing. Effectively, your cable is "dodgy", and is distorting the "digital" signal so much that it is corrupting the bits on the way through. This is much like a "marginal" signal for digital TV - you still get a picture, but it freezes and is quite blocky because parts of the ...


3

I recall a study where cable quality only matter when the length is insane, like 50m+. Sadly, I can't find the study/review right now. If I were you I wouldn't be worried and I'd run right over to monoprice.com


3

According to these Gizmodo articles (The truth about Monster cable, Part I, Part II & Part III), for a short 2m run practically any cable will do, but for 10m runs to 1080p you might run into problems with lower quality cables. They suggest trying a cheap cable to start with and if you have problems look for a certified HDMI 1.3a "Highspeed" cable. The ...


3

The TV should not be affected by you using iTunes in fullscreen Coverflow mode. The worst thing that could happen to your TV in such a case would be if you get burn-in (the same static image, such as the fullscreen iTunes controls, become burned into the image, creating a sort of ghost of the static image). Other than that, I can't really see a clear ...


3

Looks like the EDID is the problem. When you turn your TV off, the EDID of your computer video source is lost (since it is in memory in the TV). According to wikipedia: Extended display identification data (EDID) is a data structure provided by a computer display to describe its capabilities to a graphics card. It is what enables a modern personal ...


3

If you're certain that the TV supports the resolution, Try SwitchResX: http://www.madrau.com/SRX3/html/SRX/DL.shtml However, I've noticed a lot of HDTVs that incorrectly report their resolutions via the VGA hookup (even some pretty nice Bravias). A better long term solution is to grab a mini display port to HDMI adaptor, which will give you a pure digital ...


3

Sure. Current HDTV's are essentially large monitors with TV tuners built in. There are differences, mainly pixel density (or PPI).. The highest resolution TV you will get is 1920x1080, and it might be 50 inches. I have a 1920x1080 computer monitor and it's only 22 inches - meaning those 1920 pixels are smaller and closer together, thus the image will be ...


2

As long as you use an LCD with a square pixel aspect, sure - no problem at all. If the PC is already an HTPC why not have it connected directly to such a device? It might lack some features or sharpness (or do way too much post-processing) for it to be comfortable for professional use but for playing games, watching videos and some surfing - definitely ...


2

As Dani said, "Typical 32" LCD has 1366 x 766 resolution". The problem is that few video cards support this resolution. The nearest is probably 1360x768 and you can end up with aliasing that makes text look terrible. If you use a DVI to HDMI cable you may find your PC will offer 1:1 pixel mapping to something like 1360x768 with blank strips at the edges of ...



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