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12

You can have Linux boot by default and, when you want Windows, arrange for it to boot the next time only. For Grub 1, there is an example under “Booting once-only” in the manual. Make menu.lst look like: default saved title Linux root (hd0,0) kernel /vmlinuz root=/dev/sda1 ro title Windows root (hd0,1) chainloader +1 savedefault 0 The savedefault 0 ...


8

You can use pam_gnome_keyring.so to start and unlock the daemon. GDM already does this; for login, you must configure it manually. Add these lines to /etc/pam.d/login: auth optional pam_gnome_keyring.so session optional pam_gnome_keyring.so auto_start If you log in without a password (SSH with Kerberos or public keys), this may work: (I haven't ...


7

You should take a look at this wikipedia entry. I've used rtorrent and i liked it.


7

You should look at deluge. It is cross-platform, and is excellent as a headless app. Deluge is a full-featured BitTorrent client for Linux, OS X, Unix and Windows. It uses libtorrent in it's backend and features multiple user-interfaces including: GTK+, web and console. It has been designed using the client server model with a daemon ...


6

You can't. The passphrase is here precisely to make it impossible.


6

The appeal of a headless machine is that you can keep it always on, reasonably locked down, and reachable from the internet. You can put up a personal wiki, a sup MUA, a project tracker. Taking advantage of the fact that the machine is local, you can use it as a file server (NFSv4 is nice) and a media center. And you can move the computation towards the ...


6

There should be an option in the BIOS to disable a stop on keyboard error. I don't have a link for you, but that's where I would start.


5

Synopsis The requisite jobs of installing svn with keyring support and installing the Collabnet keyring_tool application are already performed for our Linux servers. 1) Configure SVN client to use keyring: 1.1) Edit ~/.subversion/config [auth] password-stores = gnome-keyring 1.2) Edit ~/.subversion/servers [global] store-passwords = yes ...


5

For Unix-based systems you can use rTorrent.


5

Headless mode just means that you won't see a window for it on your host. Use this if you are just intending to run a server and don't really care to see what is happening. You can always still RDP into it if you need to.


5

I found a couple answers elsewhere. Quoting from my first source: You may or may not want to add the location of vmrun to your default path. I chose not to as I will mostly be interacting with vmrun through shell scripts. To Launch the virtual machine named VA-LAMP.vmx which is located in the standard virtual machine directory enter the ...


5

You want to change the default runlevel, on ubuntu the way to do that is in the grub configuration. Plagiarizing heavily from this askubuntu answer (go on, upvote it...): For Ubuntu 11.10 and higher Edit /etc/default/grub with your favorite editor, sudo nano /etc/default/grub Find out this line: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" Change it ...


4

You can do so by installing an SSH server into your initramfs. One easy possibility is to use early-ssh. It installs a Dropbear SSH server right into your initramfs. With that server running you can log into your server before the root fs mount and enter the LUKS password.


4

You shouldn't have your OS to boot on an encrypted partion. Just encrypt /home, /var/www or whatever else. Make sure you can login as root if you've encrypted /home. To easily mount your partition but only after boot, add "noauto" to its fstab line in the options column, eg. /dev/sda2 /home ext3 defaults,noauto 1 1 Alternatively, if you want to whole ...


4

I'm running both an Ubuntu server and a FreeBSD server headless. The FreeBSD one sits here in a cabinet, the Ubuntu one in a co-lo facility. The difference is negligible, both are easy enough to administer via ssh if you know what you're doing. At the end of the day it boils down to what you're most familiar with because being able to come up with an ...


4

Usually administrators use SSH to access servers remotely. Install on Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install ssh It will install the OpenSSH daemon. Then use any SSH client (just ssh on Linux/Mac, PuTTY on Windows) to connect to your remote machine over the network. It will also provide SFTP/SCP for file transfers. Just make sure your network is configured properly ...


4

I don't know any way to run wine totally headless but I can point you to xvfb. It can create a virtual display to which X server can redirect its output. No need to have a physical display connected. We use it to run selenium tests in browsers on a headless Jenkins cluster. Does that meet the requirements or are you bent on running wine absolutely headless? ...


3

vino-server provides remote access to a console Gnome session, and it doesn't start until the Gnome session starts (meaning after you log into the GUI login window). There's some indication on the Ubuntu forums that you can fool it into running without a monitor by configuring GDM to autologin instead of showing the login screen; and configuring an ...


3

The VirtualBox user manual talks about headless mode on page 32 under "1.12 Alternative front-ends" VBoxHeadless is yet another front-end that produces no visible output on the host at all, but merely acts as a VRDP server. Now, even though the other graphical front-ends (VirtualBox and VBoxSDL) also have VRDP support builtin and can act as a VRDP ...


3

Host a Version Control Server to track software development If you have ever done any serious software development, you have probably used a version control system. The benefit of version control systems is, they allow multiple users to access/modify files concurrently. To host a software repository you'll usually need a server daemon. Here's a list of ...


3

I think the easiest way is to take the ard disk out of you lap top, install it on an other PC (or external hard disk case), then install linux on it an reput it into your laptop. Then you may access it with ssh.


3

It took some searching, but according to this blog at Oracle: Simply hold down Shift when launching the VM from the Manager. It's that easy. And that seems to work for me. Now they just need to document it in the manual.


2

Simple things first. Is it possible that the alsa mixer is muted by default? Try: amixer set Master 100% unmute amixer set PCM 100% unmute Anything? Questions: How did you install 9.04? Did you start from the Alternate iso? The Server edition? Is the server running X? What's starting when the machine starts? or are you intending to have some user ...


2

Ignacio is right: You should use Xvnc. That way Xvnc will start instead of a "real" X11 Display with the difference, that you can connect to it via VNC. I found this howto. But i haven't tried it on my machine but i tried a similar setup on my 9.04 box a year ago. My solution was to tell gdm to launch X11vnc instead of registering it with xinetd service. ...


2

Install a HTTP server and host your own websites and webapplications This is probably the obvious answer since that's how every webserver on the internet works. Install Apache and/or similar LAMP stack and you'll be able to host your own: Website Wiki Blog Forum I usually use my personal webserver to host a testing server to write and test my own ...


2

I believe that vnc is not the same as windows remote desktop - it is for screen sharing so if you are not logged in the vnc service won't be running. The solutions would be to set your home server to log in automatically or run an xserver on your remote computer and connect using ssh/putty. I used to use cygwin and always connected to my ubuntu box with ssh ...


2

VNC and remote desktop operate on different principles. The basic operating model for remote desktop is that it gives you access to the remote machine's actual, physical display; it doesn't give you a remote connection to the machine independently of what the local user is doing. The basic operating model for VNC is that it provides a virtual display that ...


2

You can use dd to make a copy of the raw disc image. dd if=/dev/dvd of=/srv/storage/sometitle.iso bs=32M


2

Take the hard drive out, attach it to another machine (probably via a USB adapter) and install the operating system you want on it. Make sure you have network stuff set-up to work properly by default. Put it back in the original machine. Connect to it using the network.


2

Based on what I've found, there isn't already a tool like top or conky for GPU load, but for ATI cards, you can get a decent amount of information from aticonfig, and you can also add checks of that information to a conky config. I found information that will probably be useful here. A help page for aticonfig can be found here.



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