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31

Option 1: Bluetooth audio. Option 2: 3.5mm TRS analog audio connector (wired). Facts about Bluetooth: Bluetooth audio protocol is lossy, meaning that some of the data is lost. However, it is digital, meaning that the audio reproduction in the headset is bit-exact the same data that was transmitted. The data is encoded to a digital format that is ...


17

The Solution See if you can buy a TRRS to TRS connector. Don't push the plug all the way in (as I already mentioned above). Read on for a bit of explanation... TRS and TRRS Jacks I'm afraid you won't be able to fix the problem by software. There are two types of jacks: Those headsets have a three-way jack, with a tip, two rings and a sleeve (left, ...


16

The interesting part of a USB headset is the fact that you're going to have to go from digital to analog audio at some point during the transition. The problem is, good D/A converters are not cheap - last I checked, the majority of USB headsets were made of very cheap components that do not account for high fidelity listening. This can create sound coloring ...


13

Like the other two posters said, the Noise Canceling headphones only work on constant noise. When I got mine, I thought they were defective, because I could still hear the TV. It wasn't until I took them off that I realized that they completely blocked the sound of the clothes dryer that was running. I love them on a plane as they block out 90% of the ...


12

I've just found this post on Ethiopian Review which lists the pros and cons of both. It lists these as the negatives for USB: The main negative of USB headphones is that they can be finicky in regards to being bumped or unplugged. If you unplug a standard audio jack headset, it can be plugged back in and immediately be receiving sound. However, due to ...


9

I've had the very same problem - chopping off the end of the cable, stripping the cover burning the ends of the wires with a VERY hot flame to remove the coating on them, and soldiering them to a new connector should do the trick. Geek's Law of electronics holds here - If the headphones look like you can beat someone with it, and they'll be more hurt than ...


8

You could always buy a headphone splitter for a few $$ or ££ or €€


8

You need to disable "Front panel jack detection". This will make the front and rear jacks play the same stream. Source: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/243915-49-realtek-audio-manager-sound-signal-simultaneously-front-rear


7

Yes, the iPhone can now stream music over Bluetooth as long as: Your iPhone has OS 3.0 or newer installed Your iPhone is 3G or newer Your Bluetooth headset supports the Advanced Audio Distribution Profile (A2DP), often referred to as Stereo Bluetooth More info in this Apple Tech Support article: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1664


7

The Realtek "bloatware" you speak of isn't really (solely) bloatware. It is a driver needed to detect and use the front panel sockets - it also has a UI program that displays the status of the sockets and allows you to set a few other options. The program is low on resources. You should install the driver, then if you do not want the UI, simply use ...


6

In general, there's no reason for a USB device to have better or worse quality than one plugged into a sound card. It all depends on the details of the specific item.


6

The basic functionality of a speaker (your headphones are small speakers) is this: An electromagnet has a varying current applied to it. The varying current creates a change in the magnetic field and causes a reactive material to fluctuate (deform in proportion to the change in magnetic field). The fluctuation causes changes that are detected by your ...


6

I just accidentally found a lame and hacky but working way to solve the issue - plug the headphones halfway, instead of fully, to the port :)


6

3.5mm Jack can be a bit strange. If you noticed, some of them have different numbers of black stripes on them. 1 stripe for Mono-Audio, 2 stripes for Stereo-Audio, 3 stripes for Video + Stereo-Audio (rare, and usually usable only for specific devices). I had one with 3 stripes for my D90, which enables direct playing of Video / Images from the camera ...


5

You should be able to find an adapter that has two plugs for your computer. Here's one I found by googling, but I can't vouch for the site myself: http://www.showmecables.com/viewItem.asp?idProduct=8183#


5

There are speaker boxes inside most notebook machines which are far more powerful than those within earbuds or cell phones. Many people put additional speakers around their machine to have better (or at least louder) sound output. The rumours that you could destroy floppies when you accidentally put them onto your speaker boxes seem to linger still. ;-) ...


5

Hard drives themselves have some of the more powerful magnets available to control the read-write head and are completely impervious to anything you could set on them. See this article from PCWorld busting PC myths: http://www.pcworld.com/article/116572/busting_the_biggest_pc_myths.html The only magnets powerful enough to scrub data from a drive ...


5

This is really interesting; I had the same problem also (with a Trust "USB Headset for Mac", which obviously works well with Windows and other OS:es also...). It was really frustrating, only level 1 and 2 was at all usable with the headset. This posting solved the issue for me: ...


5

That cable—or, to be more precise, its junction with the connector—is broken. This happens quite a lot with cheap headphones, but also expensive headphones might suffer from this — it all depends on how you use them and how gently you treat the cables. Makers of expensive headphones often design them in such a way that cables can be replaced easily by just ...


5

I own a couple of headsets, USB and non-usb. The USB one I have is the Creative Fatlity ($40). As for regular ones I have Bose Quiet Comfort (i know a stupid impulse buy) and a cheapo $20 altec lansing. To answer your question first, no there's not much difference that I can tell (I am not a sound aficionado by any stretch). Though I feel that the USB ...


5

There's a very simple reason why its not possible - when you plug in a pair of headphones, there's a small physical switch that cuts out main speakers so the system is not actually aware which is plugged in. The 'simplest' solution is probably to use an external sound card, or a extention cord for your headphones (even a short one) - the latter would bypass ...


4

i would be very surprised if there is such an adapter. the main problem stems from the fact that the Digital-Analog-Converter in the headset requires an active power source to function, which you typically won't get over a stereo cable. Also, most likely USB headphones from different manufacturers do not use the same software interface, which would require ...


4

Those headphones use a TRRS (tip, ring, ring, sleeve) connector to carry the stereo AND the mic signal on one cable. Most motherboards' audio jacks are TRS (stereo) jacks, and don't have the hardware to deal with the second ring (which carries the mic signals). You'll need a TRRS female to dual TRS male breakout cable:


4

Well there's your problem! [/Adam Savage] These headphones drop 15dB relative to 1kHz by the time the frequency gets as low as 60Hz and almost another 15 by the time it gets as low as 20Hz. It's that 20 to 60Hz range that really gives modern music it's kick, and it's the 60 to 100Hz range that is the nice listening bass range. Compare that to 2 other ...


4

There is a small utility created by Jonathan Kay named Skype Call Button, which can be used in this purpose. It runs in background, and catches the button press events, and you can configure what it will do: It integrates with Skype (which will ask you if you authorize this program), so that you can answer an incoming call by pressing the button.


4

I solved the problem with different output to the front panel on my ASUS P5P43TD. All you need to do is to go to Onboard Devices Configuration in BIOS settings and change Front Panel Type from HD Audio to AC97 After restarting you have now Tab called HD Audio 2nd output in Realtek Audio Manager (but keep Speakers tab as default output). If you can't see ...


4

I have a similar laptop (studio 17), and it has two headphone jacks also. Currently running Vista, I can stream audio to both headphone jacks/devices. Try updated drivers from Dell, especially the IDT Audio Control Panel Driver...I have no problems, and it didn't require any set up...Is your machine an upgrade from Vista?


4

Try updating your audio drivers; on some laptops it appears to be represented as a single device. What kind of audio hardware is in the laptop? Any device ID or driver version may help locate a fix for your problem. However I would see if newer drivers for Windows 7 for your audio device exist that may correct the problem right away.


4

I found these solutions but they only seem to work with certain media players: http://www.srslabs.com/anniversary/hd_audio.html http://www.fxsound.com/dfx/index.php Honestly, I think this is one of the things that end up worse than before, mainly because laptop speakers are inherently crappy and pumping them will make them sound, well, super-crappy. Just ...


4

What you want is headphones that offer good noise isolation. The best type of headphone for noise isolation are called "in-ear monitors", sometimes called "ear canal headphones." These are basically like earplugs with speakers built in. These go inside your ear canal and seal out sound from outside. Note that this is different than iPod-style headphones ...



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