Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

I have used MacDrive in the past, but I recently stumbled upon this free method (assuming you have a Mac OS X install disc). Looks good, but I haven't had a chance to test it. Note: The free method uses the Boot Camp driver in the OS X install disk.  It seems to be read-only and for the Intel processor only (i.e., it doesn't work with an AMD-based ...


7

The differences came from different reasons: different ways of counting, different tools, compression and what looks like a bug. The first difference in size you see seems to be a bug in the Finder. The file sizes shown by the Finder are somehow calculated in real time and cached in .DS_Store files. For some reason, while duplicating a big ...


5

MacDrive or HFS for Windows, TransMac are all good options, there is also HFSExplorer - it is free, but only provides read access.


5

Other free utilities you can try are: DiskDigger DiskDigger can recover files from any type of media that your computer can read. This includes USB flash drives, memory cards (SD, CompactFlash, Memory Stick, etc), and of course your hard drive. The types of files that it recovers include photos, videos, music, documents, and many other ...


5

You will need a piece of windows specific software that is smart enough to do a NTFS scan / recovery of the drive. I would ask to have this moved to SuperUser - the expertise there would be most helpful in getting you better options. Above all - eject and disconnect the drive and keep it powered off until you have better advice. In the mean time, perhaps ...


5

bindfs is the answer. It will take an already mounted file system and provide a view of it with whichever uid you'd like: sudo apt-get install bindfs mkdir ~/myUIDdiskFoo sudo bindfs -u $(id -u) -g $(id -g) /media/diskFoo ~/myUIDdiskFoo Edit: Also, reading the doc I realized that the map option (1.10 and later) might fit better: sudo bindfs --map ...


3

Well, first of all, you also have the choice to use FAT 32 too. Yeah, it's not that great, but you have first-class read and write support from both OSes. Then, maybe give exFAT a spin. It's natively supported in both OS X and Windows. Linux might be more tricky though. And finally, if you want to spend money, the choice is really yours. I'd try and check ...


3

This question is a bit old but I came across it while trying to mount an HFS+ partition in the same circumstances, and found the solution. I'm not quite sure how it is related to kernel version, mine is 3.13 (3.13.7-1 x86_64, Debian). Short answer Provide the size of the partition as well as its offset. Long answer First get the partition's information ...


2

The stability issues of HFS+ (non journaled) were mainly about accessing drives > 2TB. This limit was removed at the end of June 2011. Open bugs can be tracked at bugzilla.kernel.org. Discussions and patches for HFS+ on Linux are submitted to the linux-fsdevel list. Changes to the HFS+ source code can be tracked at git.kernel.org. There is still no Journal ...


2

It's worth noting that Microsoft now has ReFS (resilient file system) on Windows 2012+ and Windows 8.1, which does check integrity. Furthermore, if you run ReFS on a mirrored storage space, it can automatically correct those errors by using bits from the other side of the mirror. ReFS doesn't support all the features of NTFS, so you'll have to decide if ...


2

As we found out in the comments, there are two possible problems at hand here: You are trying to run the copy as a regular user. This may cause reading the source files to fail because you don't have read permissions to them. This is easily corrected by running the copying through sudo just like you did the mount. You get cp: omitting directory Documents/ ...


2

If you are running Lion, man fsck_hfs and look at the -B option which says it will print files given a list of block numbers. Note: I had to include -n -f on the command to force a check, otherwise it just reported *** NO MATCH *** for all the blocks in my list. Also, before attempting to overwrite a block, I'd want to develop and run some test to verify ...


2

Linux has losetup which you can use to attach a file to the system as a block device. E.g. losetup /dev/loop0 macfoo.dmg


2

I believe what is happening is that the drive was partitioned with some other software, the ubuntu/OSX dual boot loader probably is confusing the situation... Now this will be a completely destructive wipe of the drive... Go into disk utility Highlight the drive (not partition) that you want to wipe... (Down at the status bar, it should the Type (eg. ...


2

XP? Sorry, but you can't get there from here. Intel based Macs boot from GPT partitioned hard drives, and Windows XP can't read GPT discs at all without a third party driver, if one exists. If you create the partition on your Mac, Vista and 7 should see it, I would think, unless Apple is doing something wrong with the partition table.


2

I believe what you're looking for is Palimpsest Disk Utility (though it's usually only called Disk Utility). You should already have it installed; if not, try installing gnome-disk-utility. (This screenshot lifted from Ubuntu 12.04. Yours will be a bit more green...)


2

Have you considered UDF, as POSIX compliant and supported by almost every device around? There's also plenty of help around e.g. Using UDF on a USB flash drive. Alternatively you could have a look at ZFS, as there are kernel modules, with RW support, for both OS X and Linux?


2

Yes, the issue is that there is no native support in Windows for Apple's formatting (HFS/HFS+). So you have a few options: You could buy (or use a trial) for MacDrive in Windows (works well in my experience) You could boot into a Linux Live Disc, install the HFS Utils and open it there. (Ubuntu is a simple go-to for this). sudo apt-get install ...


2

GetDataBackNTFS is your answer. It can help you recover from deleted files, partition remappings, and even complete format, wipe and reloads of Windows. It has saved my quite a few times, but is not free to use. The same company also offers a program for FAT32 formatted partitions, if needed


2

They are hidden files created & used by Mac OS 6 to 9 (so pre-Mac OS X, if I understand correctly). See Apple's KB and your favourite search engine for more info.


2

In the Accounts Preference Pane, right click (control click seems to work better for some reason) on the user whose home folder you want to move and select Advanced Options… From there you can choose a new location for the home folder that will take effect upon reboot.


2

It does not really matter. See here for more on the subject (though not a lot more).


2

I wasn't able to figure out how to ignore the permissions, but I ended up changing the UID on my Ubuntu account to match my OSX account: sudo useradd -d /home/tempuser -m -s /bin/bash -G admin tempuser sudo passwd tempuser Enter new password. Log out, log in as "other" with username "tempuser" and the password you chose earlier. Open a terminal and type: ...


2

I tried various other search terms and found that this question is actually a duplicate of this one: OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard no longer mounting an external USB drive. Here's what I did to fix: Download and install GPT fdisk Run gdisk and select problem drive: ~% sudo gdisk GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 0.8.1 Type device filename, or press <Enter> to ...


1

Add /rsrc to the end of the file name to access the resource fork. I have no I idea where that's documented if anywhere. Edit: Just to clarify I was referring to command-line usage for example cp somefile/rsrc destfile will copy the resouce fork of somefile a file called destfile. All command-line functions work this way. I haven't tested it with anything ...


1

Use Disk Utility to save, on the NTFS volume, an image of either: the HFS Plus volume that includes Backups.backupdb; or the folder that contains Backups.backupdb . Sparse bundle disk image may be ideal. It's the type of image preferred by Time Machine.


1

In the end, I created a linux user with the same UID of my mac os x user, but it can't browse every directory in my home on mac hfs+ volume because a lot of files were owned by mac user "unknown", UID 99 (see http://googlemac.blogspot.com/2007/03/user-99-unknown.html). It seems that they did so to let you mount and read your volume when you connect it to a ...


1

Paragon's HFS solution appears to be the optimal solution in this case; it's free and provides the most features at no cost. Here is a direct link: https://www.paragon-software.com/home/hfs-windows-free/ Most of the other options cost around 20 USD...


1

There are other products for accessing HFS+ under Windows, although most are commercial : jhfsplus (free, based on MacDrive) Paragon HFS+ for Windows ($19.95, 10-day trial) MacDrive ($49.99, 5-day trial) You could at least use the trial of Paragon to see if it improves the detection of HFS+ volumes, as Paragon makes good products.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible