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The SoC device used on the Pi does not have builtin support for ethernet so the ethernet functionality on the Pi is provided by a USB-ethernet chip, sharing the same USB bus as any other USB peripheral you might have connected to it (including any USB flash drives). This is probably the main reason why you see abysmal performance. Solution? Sadly there is ...


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Based on the details provided in the question, here are some factors that could affect the local transfer rate: The resources on the Raspberry Pi The read speed of the hard drive connected via USB (read speed should typically be high but not sure if drive is faulty) The USB drivers on the Raspberry Pi The USB connecter/external case that connects the hard ...


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Run your three TP-Link routers in "BRIDGE" mode if you can't replace them with switches. This will give you a single NAT domain, and you will only need port forwarding on the edge router (The Motorola)


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Get rid of the routers. From your question, it seems that all the TP-Link routers are used pretty much only to provide additional ports – to act as Ethernet switches – but you don't really have any need for their IP routing functions. If that's the case, replace them with basic switches. Or at least make sure the various high-level functions ...


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You didnt state your ip addressing for your wifi. I think you should use disjoint addressing patterns on both interfaces... Eg if your wifi provides 192.168.1.0/24, configure your LAN interfaces on 10.2.0.0/24...or vice versa... Then as usual, leave the gateway blank for the LAN connections... This should work ok I suppose.


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In many attempts simple configuration of static IPs on 2 PCs will fail for seemingly unknown reasons (if you try it on the same subnet as proposed above or on a different one). You get no ping, and not even valid mac address resolutions shows up on arp -a command. What works best for me (After failing the strait forward static ip approach) is using windows ...


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Opening a TCP port to a host behind a NAT or firewall allows unsolicited connection attempts to be made to that host from the Internet. These connection attempts then have to be handled by the operating system of that host, which either pass on the connection to an application that is bound to that port, or, if none, reject the connection attempt. Should ...


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It is possible that an attacker can use this open port to gain access to your single computer. (Various ways all depending on the attack method). If they gain access to the single computer they then can attack the rest of the network with a broader attack. This is because the information between devices behind the firewall are usually not checked by consumer ...


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First update your antivirus, inspect any exemptions of files or folders and question if you find anything that is exempt from being scanned, then run a full scan. Then you could narrow down things by looking through your firewall rules and see if anything looks out of place. Based on if you identify anything that looks out of place then research to see if ...


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It's not uncommon for networking devices to list the signaling speeds of their ports individually without regard for whether the bandwidth offered by the other ports (or the embedded CPU controlling it all) can successfully sustain data flows at the speeds afforded by the fastest port. It's more an indication that it can interoperate with other devices ...


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Shhhhh...don't tell the masses. My understanding is that this is simply a lie & I wish they couldn't do this. Per some enlightening amazon reviews maybe this is the speed between the two power-line adapter devices (the house/AC wiring), but indeed its crippled coming out of the actual physical interface port. Most people don't care too much since they ...



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