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As a general note, it's usually easier to "pull" files (in your case to initiate the transfer from the Mac). It's also safer, because you only have to enable "read" access on the system from which you're getting the files (the Windows PC). I used the following procedure to transfer files from my Windows 7 laptop (which I was getting ready to retire) to my ...


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Thanks for the comments. I found the problem in a totally unexpected place. First the answer: The culprit is Google Drive syncing through my router. When I shut down Google Drive or bypass my router my bandwidth returns. The rest of this answer contains more details; you may want to skip but some like to hear them: [Sidebar puzzle: I do not ...


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Start by checking your firewall rules,, and see if you have ICMP filtering rules on - that does affect pings. Next, check your router - it might have diagnostic tools which can have the router itself ping sites and such. See if there are such tools and then use the tools to try and replicate the problem. If they are replicated at the router itself, check ...


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If you're working through the GUI in Windows 8.x: set the Scope of the Local IP address to "Any IP address" set the Remote IP address to "These IP addresses" select "Internet" under the list of "Predefined set of computers" Make sure to check the correct profile that is assigned to the network card that you want this rule to work on. Lastly: check that ...


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No, it won't work. Ethernet over coax (10base5 or 10base2) involves a Manchester-coded 10 MHz signal (which looks more like 20 MHz when busy). So the frequency spectrum varies tremendously depending on the traffic. An antenna resonant at 10 MHz will be rather large; one that works efficiently from 10 to 20 MHz will be very difficult to build. Also, carrier ...


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You could conceivably make this work, but you might also be breaking the law by broadcasting radio signals on frequencies you're not licensed to use. Modern Ethernet to coax adapter technologies, such as MoCA, work by sending data modulated on radio frequency carriers over a wide range of frequencies, usually picked not to conflict with cable TV channels. ...


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Most of the adapters do offer encryption, please check the model you are looking at before you purchase it. Also, the signal does fade even over a house distance, you may be able to pick the signal up at the street, but I wouldn't suspect you would be able to go much further than that.


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The solution is to create a bridge in the IPS in this screnario. I connected to the IPS and created a bridge # ifconfig bridge create bridge0 As shown above bridge0 was created. Now connect the NIC's together. In my example vr0 is the NIC to the router and rl0 and rl1 are the one being connected to the Personal Computer's. # ifconfig bridge0 addm rl0 up ...


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As others have mentioned. the server in your design is acting as a gateway(router). and it requires two nic to function (1 to modem, 1 to switch). you will have to configure network services such as DHCP, DNS, firewall, NAT...etc on the server OS. As for the wireless router, you may have one of its LAN port connected to the switch, and disable all routing ...


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If the SSID settings are the same you should be able to roam between your Linksys devices. However I wouldn't be surprised if roaming between the Linksys and D-Link boxes was problematic - manufacturers don't necessarily play nice when it comes to interoperability :)


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Based on the link you posted, they are giving instructions to route 8.8.8.8 to nowhere which apparently forces the Roku to use whatever DHCP servers are in the DHCP scope. Based on what your ISP will allow you to do, here are your options. If your ISP can configure the DSL modem as a bridge instead of a NAT/Router, you can use your own router instead. ...


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"Cascading" is a non-standard term, so if you find few questions with that in them, it's not a surprise. Using multiple routers (per below, most being used as APs, one as router and AP ), is dirt common. Very likley you have interference between the Access Points (for the sake of my sanity, if not yours, let's call the "part that provides WiFi" the Access ...


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A Skype call is mostly hosted by one user in the call (Most of the times, this is the person who started the call). If the person who started the call is on your network, then traffic does not have to pass through the router as the router knows the destination of the traffic as a device in it's own LAN network. Your user will however be disconnected from the ...



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